The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
Roman Catholic deacon wearing a dalmatic
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Ornately embroidered dalmatic (shown from the back with an appareled amice)
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
A deacon in a dalmatic and a biretta
Choir dress of a cardinal
Bishop wearing a sakkos
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
Dalmatic Roman usage (with its closed sleeves)
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Baroque dalmatic (with slit, flap-like sleeves common for dalmatics worn outside Italy)
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Capa pluvial (cope) and ornately embroidered dalmatic pairs (late 1800s, early 1900s, Our Lady of Manaoag museum, Philippines)
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).

At solemn papal liturgical occasions the Pope is assisted by two cardinal-deacons vested in a dalmatic and wearing a mitra simplex (simple white mitre).

- Dalmatic

When not celebrating Mass but still serving a liturgical function, such as the semiannual Urbi et Orbi papal blessing, some Papal Masses and some events at Ecumenical Councils, cardinal deacons can be recognized by the dalmatics they would don with the simple white mitre (so called mitra simplex).

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)
The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A 6th-century image of Saint Augustine, bishop of Hippo Regius.

Bishop

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Ordained clergy member who is entrusted with a position of authority and oversight in a religious institution.

Ordained clergy member who is entrusted with a position of authority and oversight in a religious institution.

A 6th-century image of Saint Augustine, bishop of Hippo Regius.
Ignatius, bishop of Antioch, student of John the Apostle
A bishop with other officials on an 11th-century grave in Sweden.
Johann Otto von Gemmingen, Prince-Bishop of Augsburg
A mitre is used as a symbol of the bishop's ministry in Western Christianity.
One form for the coat of arms of a Catholic bishop
A bishop administering Confirmation. Rogier van der Weyden, The Seven Sacraments, 15th century.
In the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church the administration of Confirmation is normally reserved to the local bishop.
Danish Lutheran bishops wearing a cope over cassock, surplice, ruff and pectoral cross.
The consecrated bishop is the only minister of Holy Orders. Photo of pre-Vatican II ceremony.
Katharine Jefferts Schori, The 26th presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church (United States)
Mikael Agricola (1510–1557), a Finnish Lutheran clergyman and the Bishop of Turku
United Methodist Episcopal Shield
Francis Asbury's ordination as bishop by Thomas Coke at the 1784 Christmas Conference.
Eastern Rite Catholic bishops celebrating Divine Liturgy in their proper pontifical vestments
An Anglican bishop with a crosier, wearing a rochet under a red chimere and cuffs, a black tippet, and a pectoral cross
An Episcopal bishop immediately before presiding at the Great Vigil of Easter in the narthex of St. Michael's Episcopal Cathedral in Boise, Idaho.
Catholic bishop dressed for the Sacrifice of the Mass. No Pontifical gloves.

The Lord Chancellor of England was almost always a bishop up until the dismissal of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey by Henry VIII.

The Caeremoniale Episcoporum recommends, but does not impose, that in solemn celebrations a bishop should also wear a dalmatic, which can always be white, beneath the chasuble, especially when administering the sacrament of holy orders, blessing an abbot or abbess, and dedicating a church or an altar.

The evolution of the mitre, from the Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)

Mitre

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Type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial headdress of bishops and certain abbots in traditional Christianity.

Type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial headdress of bishops and certain abbots in traditional Christianity.

The evolution of the mitre, from the Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)
Mitre of the Orthodox Metropolitan Saint Chrysostomos of Smyrna, martyred when the Turks captured the city in 1922.
Elaborately embroidered Eastern Orthodox mitre, 1715. The Orthodox mitre, adopted after the fall of Constantinople, is derived from the Byzantine crown.
Bishops of the Armenian Catholic Church in Jerusalem wearing mitres.
A Russian grenadier mitre.
Prussian 1st Garde-Regiment zu Fuss in mitres 1894.
A chess bishop in the standard Staunton pattern.
Mitre simplex traditional style: White damask with its white lappets ending in red fringes.
Benedict XVI wearing a pretiosa: elaborately embroidered mitre.
Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishop's mitre.

Mitres are worn in the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Anglican Communion, some Lutheran churches, for important ceremonies, by the Metropolitan of the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church, and also, in the Catholic Church, all cardinals, whether or not bishops, and some Eastern Orthodox archpriests.

As an item of Imperial regalia, along with other such items as the sakkos (Imperial dalmatic) and epigonation, the mitre came to signify the temporal authority of bishops (especially that of the Patriarch of Constantinople) within the administration of the Rum millet (i.e., the Christian community) of the Ottoman Empire.