The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Saint Mark's Basilica, the Cathedral of the Patriarch of Venice.
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
Saint Peter's Chair, the oldest throne of the diocese of Venice in the co-cathedral of Saint Peter of Castello. It is likely an ancient Muslim gravestone transported from Antioch by merchants.
Choir dress of a cardinal
Saint Mark's Basilica, the main altar: it retains inside the body of the Apostle St. Mark the Evangelist.
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).

In the case of Venice, an additional privilege allows the patriarch, even if he is not a cardinal, the use of the colour red in non-liturgical vestments.

- Patriarch of Venice

(Latin Church patriarchs who become cardinals are cardinal priests, not cardinal bishops: for example Angelo Scola was made Patriarch of Venice in 2002 and cardinal priest of Santi XII Apostoli in 2003.) Those of cardinal patriarch rank continue to hold their patriarchal see and are not assigned any Roman title (suburbicarian see or title or deaconry).

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)
The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).

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Coat of arms of Patriarch José de Almeida Neto, featuring the papal tiara

Patriarch of Lisbon

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Coat of arms of Patriarch José de Almeida Neto, featuring the papal tiara
Portrait of Patriarch Patrício da Silva (r. 1826–1840), featuring the three-tiered patriarchal mitre that is reminscent of the Papal tiara

The Patriarch of Lisbon (Patriarcha Olisiponensis, Patriarca de Lisboa), also called the Cardinal-Patriarch of Lisbon once he has been made cardinal, is the ordinary bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lisbon.

He is one of the few patriarchs in the Latin Church of the Catholic Church, along with the Patriarchs of Venice, the East Indies, and Jerusalem.

Pope John XXIII

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Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 28 October 1958 until his death in 1963.

Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 28 October 1958 until his death in 1963.

The young Roncalli
Roncalli as Patriarch of Venice
Commander of the Legion of Honour received in 1953
Pope John XXIII's coronation on 4 November 1958. He was crowned wearing the 1877 Palatine Tiara.
Monument to Pope John XXIII in Porto Viro (Rovigo)
John XXIII with Prime Minister of Lebanon Sami as-Solh, 1959
John XXIII greets sportsmen for the 1960 Summer Olympics on 28 August 1960.
Pope John XXIII on Time magazine cover of 4 January 1963
The original tomb of John XXIII (until 2000) in the Vatican necropolis.
The body of John XXIII in the altar of Saint Jerome
The canonization ceremony of John XXIII and John Paul II
Statue of John XXIII in Portugal

In a consistory on 12 January 1953 Pope Pius XII made Roncalli a cardinal as the Cardinal-Priest of Santa Prisca in addition to naming him as the Patriarch of Venice.

On 12 January 1953, he was appointed Patriarch of Venice and raised to the rank of Cardinal-Priest of Santa Prisca by Pope Pius XII.

Portrait by Ernest Walter Histed, c. 1914

Pope Pius X

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Head of the Catholic Church from 4 August 1903 to his death in 1914.

Head of the Catholic Church from 4 August 1903 to his death in 1914.

Portrait by Ernest Walter Histed, c. 1914
The Marian image of Our Lady of Confidence, for whom Pius X had a religious devotion. The Basilica of Saint John Lateran.
Pius X in 1903.
A young Giuseppe Sarto
Photo as Cardinal Giuseppe Sarto
Cardinal Luigi Macchi announces the election of Sarto as Pope Pius X.
An official photograph of Pius X wearing Papal regalia on 14 August 1903
Pope Pius X resting in the Vatican Gardens
Pius X in his study while receiving a portraiture. Nearby is a statue of John Vianney.
Gala Berlin produced in Rome by the Casalini brothers, renowned carriage manufacturers, during the papacy of Pius IX, whose coat of arms is painted on both doors. As shown by the emblems of Pius IX and Pius X, painted on the right and left doors respectively, the carriage was used during various pontificates until the beginning of the twentieth century.
Monsignor Eugenio Pacelli at left and Cardinal Secretary Rafael Merry del Val at the signing ceremony of the Serbian concordat during the pontificate of Pius X, dated 24 June 1914
Pius X consecrates Bishop Giacomo Paolo Giovanni Battista della Chiesa, the future Pope Benedict XV, in the Vatican in 1907.
Pius X's body shortly after his death.
The statue of Pius X in St. Peter's Basilica
Pius X during his lying in state, 21–22 August 1914
The tomb of Pope Pius X under the Presentation chapel altar in Saint Peter's Basilica
Life of Pope Pius X, depicted on a window in San Pio X alla Balduina

Pope Leo XIII made him a cardinal of the order of cardinal priests in a secret consistory on 12 June 1893.

Three days later in a public consistory on 15 June, Pope Leo XIII gave him his cardinal's red galero, assigned him the titular church of San Bernardo alle Terme, and appointed him Patriarch of Venice.

Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms

Patriarch

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The highest-ranking bishops in Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Catholic Church (above major archbishop and primate), the Hussite Church, and the Church of the East are termed patriarchs (and in certain cases also popes – such as the Pope of Rome or Pope of Alexandria, and catholicoi – such as Catholicos Karekin II).

The highest-ranking bishops in Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Catholic Church (above major archbishop and primate), the Hussite Church, and the Church of the East are termed patriarchs (and in certain cases also popes – such as the Pope of Rome or Pope of Alexandria, and catholicoi – such as Catholicos Karekin II).

Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms
Map of Justinian's Pentarchy
Patriarch of Alexandria Ibrahim Isaac Sidrak. wearing a distinctive clothing of a patriarch

Furthermore, patriarchs who are created cardinals form part of the order of cardinal bishops, whereas major archbishops are only created cardinal priests.

The Patriarch of Venice, established 1451.

John Paul I on 19 September 1978

Pope John Paul I

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Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City from 26 August 1978 to his death 33 days later.

Head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City from 26 August 1978 to his death 33 days later.

John Paul I on 19 September 1978
Pope Paul VI makes Luciani a cardinal in 1973
Albino Luciani in 1969
John Paul I photographed from his study's window
Tomb of John Paul I in the Vatican Grottoes
1000 lire silver coin with a portrait of John Paul I on the front (1978)
The Pope Luciani museum.
Albino Luciani approximately at the age of 10, c. 1922-23

On 15 December 1969, Luciani was appointed the new patriarch of Venice by Pope Paul VI, taking possession of his new archdiocese the following February.

Pope Paul VI created Luciani the Cardinal-Priest of San Marco in the consistory on 5 March 1973.

Cardinal Scola in 2014.

Angelo Scola

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Cardinal Scola in 2014.
Arms of Cardinal Scola of Venice
Cardinal Scola blessing the faithful with the Blessed Sacrament in Venice, 2005.

Angelo Scola (born 7 November 1941) is an Italian Cardinal of the Catholic Church, philosopher and theologian.

He had served as Patriarch of Venice from 2002 to 2011.