A report on Cardinal (Catholic Church)

The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
Choir dress of a cardinal
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).

Senior member of the clergy of the Catholic Church.

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)
The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).

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St. Peter's Basilica

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Church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave that is within the city of Rome, Italy.

Church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave that is within the city of Rome, Italy.

View from the Tiber on Ponte Sant'Angelo and the Basilica. The iconic dome dominates the skyline of Rome.
St. Peter and the Apostles on the Facade of St. Peter's Basilica
Bishops at the Second Vatican Council in 1962
Crepuscular rays are seen in St. Peter's Basilica at certain times each day.
An early interpretation of the relative locations of the circus, and the medieval and current Basilicas of St. Peter.
One possible modern interpretation
Maarten van Heemskerck - Santa Maria della Febbre, Vatican Obelisk, Saint Peter's Basilica in construction (1532)
A conjectural view of the Old St. Peter's Basilica by H. W. Brewer, 1891
Bramante's plan
Raphael's plan
Michelangelo's plan
Bramante's dome
Sangallo's design
St. Peter's Basilica from Castel Sant'Angelo showing the dome rising behind Maderno's façade.
1506 medal by Cristoforo Foppa depicting Bramante's design, including the four flanking smaller domes
The engraving by Stefan du Pérac was published in 1569, five years after the death of Michelangelo
The dome was brought to completion by Giacomo della Porta and Fontana.
Architectural details of the central part looking upward into the dome
Michelangelo's plan extended with Maderno's nave and narthex
Maderno's façade, with the statues of Saint Peter (left) and Saint Paul (right) flanking the entrance stairs
The narthex
Maderno's nave, looking towards the chancel
The apse with St. Peter's Cathedra supported by four Doctors of the Church
The altar with Bernini's baldacchino
Bernini's Cathedra Petri and Gloria
St. Peter's Basilica and the piazza at night
One of the two fountains which form the axis of the piazza.
Evening aerial view of the piazza and facade
View of Rome from the Dome of St. Peter's Basilica
Air vents for the crypt in St. Peter's Basilica
Cardinals at Mass in Saint Peter's Basilica two days before a papal conclave, 16 April 2005.
The inauguration of Pope Francis in 2013
Silhouette of St. Peter's Basilica at sundown (view from Castel Sant'Angelo).
alt= A marble statue showing a matronly woman in a sweeping cloak supporting a cross which stands beside her and presenting a set of nails to the viewer with her left hand|Saint Helena
alt= This statue shows a Roman soldier, with a cloak furling around him, gazing upward while he supports a long spear with his right hand and throws out his other hand in amazement.|Saint Longinus
alt= This statue shows an elderly man, bare-chested, and draped, looking up despairingly as he supports a large cross, arranged diagonally.|Saint Andrew
alt= This statue shows the saint as a young woman, who, with a sweeping dramatic gesture, displays a cloth on which there is an image of the face of Jesus.|Saint Veronica
alt= A pair of bronze doors divided into sixteen panels containing reliefs depicting scenes mainly from the life of Jesus and stories that he told.|The Holy Door is opened only for great celebrations.
alt= A large memorial set in a niche. The marble figure of a kneeling pope is surrounded by allegoric marble figures, and sculptured drapery surfaced with patterned red stone.|The tomb of Alexander VII, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, 1671–1678.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.saintpetersbasilica.org/Docs/seminarians4.htm|website=saintpetersbasilica.org|title=The Seminarian GuidesNorth American College, Rome|access-date=29 July 2009}}</ref>
alt= Peter is shown as a bearded man in draped garment like a toga. He is seated on a chair made of marble, and has his right hand raised in a gesture of blessing while in his left hand he holds two large keys. Behind the statue, the wall is patterned in mosaic to resemble red and gold brocade cloth.|The bronze statue of Saint Peter holding the keys of heaven, attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio.
alt= This marble statue shows the Virgin Mary seated, mourning over the lifeless body of Jesus which is supported across her knees.|The Pietà by Michelangelo, 1498–1499, is in the north aisle.

Maderno's last work at St. Peter's was to design a crypt-like space or "Confessio" under the dome, where the cardinals and other privileged persons could descend in order to be nearer to the burial place of the apostle.

Portrait by Pietro da Cortona, c. 1624–1627 (oil on canvas, Capitoline Museums)

Pope Urban VIII

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Head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 6 August 1623 to his death in 1644.

Head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 6 August 1623 to his death in 1644.

Portrait by Pietro da Cortona, c. 1624–1627 (oil on canvas, Capitoline Museums)
C. 1598 painting of Maffeo Barberini at age 30 by Caravaggio.
Gold quadrupla coin of Pope Urban VIII, struck at the Avignon mint, dated 1629
Engraving of Pope Urban VIII
Bust of Urban VIII, Gianlorenzo Bernini, 1637–8
The Barberini Vase, now re-named the Portland Vase
Statue of Pope Urban VIII sculpted by Gian Lorenzo Bernini and his students between 1635 and 1640, and on display at the Palazzo dei Conservatori in Rome
Bust by Giovanni Gonnelli
Constitutio contra astrologos iudiciarios, 1631

Pope Paul V also later employed Barberini in a similar capacity, afterwards raising him, in 1606, to the order of the Cardinal-Priest, with the titular church of San Pietro in Montorio and appointing him as a papal legate of Bologna.

Hagia Sophia, the cathedral of Constantinople at the time of the schism

East–West Schism

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Break of communion since 1054 between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.

Break of communion since 1054 between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.

Hagia Sophia, the cathedral of Constantinople at the time of the schism
Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine (centre) and the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325) holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381
Changes in the extent of the Empire ruled from Constantinople.
476 End of the Western Empire; 550 Conquests of Justinian I; 717 Accession of Leo the Isaurian; 867 Accession of Basil I; 1025 Death of Basil II; 1095 Eve of the First Crusade; 1170 Under Manuel I; 1270 Under Michael VIII Palaiologos; 1400 Before the fall of Constantinople

These two letters were entrusted to a delegation of three legates, headed by the undiplomatic cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, and also including Frederick of Lorraine, who was papal secretary and Cardinal-Deacon of Santa Maria in Domnica, and Peter, Archbishop of Amalfi.

Ottaviani in 1966

Alfredo Ottaviani

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Ottaviani in 1966
Ottaviani (second from right) at the signing of the Reichskonkordat
Cardinal Ottaviani in October 1958
Ottaviani in December 1962

Alfredo Ottaviani (29 October 1890 – 3 August 1979) was an Italian cardinal of the Catholic Church.

Cardinal Guillaume Dubois by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1723)

Guillaume Dubois

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Cardinal Guillaume Dubois by Hyacinthe Rigaud (1723)

Guillaume Dubois (6 September 1656 – 10 August 1723) was a French cardinal and statesman.

Cardinal de Fleury, official portrait by Hyacinthe Rigaud, Château de Versailles

André-Hercule de Fleury

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Cardinal de Fleury, official portrait by Hyacinthe Rigaud, Château de Versailles
The duc d'Orléans' Council with Cardinal Fleury

André-Hercule de Fleury, Bishop of Fréjus, Archbishop of Aix (22 June or 26 June 1653 – 29 January 1743) was a French cardinal who served as the chief minister of Louis XV.

Robert Guiscard is proclaimed by Pope Nicholas II as a duke as the cardinal-bishops look on.

In nomine Domini

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Papal bull written by Pope Nicholas II and a canon of the Council of Rome.

Papal bull written by Pope Nicholas II and a canon of the Council of Rome.

Robert Guiscard is proclaimed by Pope Nicholas II as a duke as the cardinal-bishops look on.

The bull was issued on 13 April 1059 and caused major reforms in the system of papal election, most notably establishing the cardinal-bishops as the sole electors of the pope, with the consent of minor clergy.

La Storta (Roma) Cathedral

Roman Catholic Suburbicarian Diocese of Porto–Santa Rufina

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Suburbicarian diocese of the Diocese of Rome and a diocese of the Catholic Church in Italy.

Suburbicarian diocese of the Diocese of Rome and a diocese of the Catholic Church in Italy.

La Storta (Roma) Cathedral

From 1967, the diocese has had both a titular cardinal bishop, and a resident bishop who handles the diocesan business.

Cathedral in Poggio Mirteto

Roman Catholic Suburbicarian Diocese of Sabina–Poggio Mirteto

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Cathedral in Poggio Mirteto

The Diocese of Sabina–Poggio Mirteto is a suburbicarian see of the Holy Roman Church (which means it carries the rare rank of cardinal-bishop) and a diocese of the Catholic Church in Italy in the Roman province of the Pope.

Pope John Paul II (1920–2005) with Cardinal Alfonso López Trujillo (1935–2008)

Cardinals created by John Paul II

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Pope John Paul II ((r.

Pope John Paul II ((r.

Pope John Paul II (1920–2005) with Cardinal Alfonso López Trujillo (1935–2008)
Józef Glemp (1929–2013), made a cardinal on 2 February 1983.
Francis Arinze (born 1932), made a cardinal on 25 May 1985
Henryk Gulbinowicz (1923–2020), made a cardinal on 25 May 1985
José Freire Falcão (1925-2021), made a cardinal on 28 June 1988.
Angelo Sodano (1927-2022), made a cardinal on 28 June 1991.
Nasrallah Boutros Sfeir (1920–2019), made a cardinal on 26 November 1994
Jan Pieter Schotte (1928–2005), made a cardinal on 26 November 1994
Kazimierz Świątek (1914–2011), made a cardinal on 26 November 1994
Dionigi Tettamanzi (1927–2017), made a cardinal on 21 February 1998.
Christoph Schönborn (born 1945), made a cardinal on 21 February 1998.
Jorge Mario Bergoglio (born 1936), made a cardinal on 21 February 2001, elected Pope on 13 March 2013
Cardinals Walter Kasper (born 1933) and Godfried Danneels (1933–2019)
Óscar Andrés Rodríguez Maradiaga (born 1942), made a cardinal on 21 February 2001
Attilio Nicora (1937–2017), made a cardinal on 21 October 2003
Josip Bozanić (born 1949), made a cardinal on 21 October 2003

1978 – 2005)) created 231 cardinals in nine consistories held at roughly three-year intervals.