Cardinal (Catholic Church)

The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).
Cardinal Richelieu, chief minister of France
Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna and Cardinal-Priest of San Crisogono
Choir dress of a cardinal
Cardinal Sodano (1927-2022), Dean Emeritus of the college
Cardinal-priest Thomas Wolsey
Coat of arms of Cardinal Martino, current Cardinal Protodeacon
Reginald Pole was a cardinal for 18 years before he was ordained a priest.
A Cardinal in Profile, 1880, by Jehan Georges Vibert (Morgan Library and Museum, New York City)
alt=Théodore Adrien Cardinal  Sarr with a ferraiolo, and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.|Cardinal Sarr with a ferraiolo and wearing a red cassock, but not the rest of the choir dress.
alt=Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.|Cardinals Walter Kasper (left) and Godfried Danneels (right) wearing their choir dress: scarlet (red) cassock, white rochet trimmed with lace, scarlet mozetta, scarlet biretta (over the usual scarlet zucchetto), and pectoral cross on cord.
alt=Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).|Cardinal Bertone in dress for hot tropical countries (white cassock with scarlet piping and buttons).

Senior member of the clergy of the Catholic Church, immediately behind the pope in the order of precedence.

- Cardinal (Catholic Church)
The coat of arms of a cardinal (who is a bishop) is indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual cardinal).

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Palestrina Cathedral

Roman Catholic Suburbicarian Diocese of Palestrina

Roman Catholic suburbicarian diocese centered on the comune of Palestrina in Italy.

Roman Catholic suburbicarian diocese centered on the comune of Palestrina in Italy.

Palestrina Cathedral
Palestrina as it appeared in 1671

Like all dioceses in this category, for historical reasons it has had, since 1960, an incumbent diocesan bishop with ordinary powers but also has assigned to it as an honorary high ranking dignity one of the six cardinals in the Order of Cardinal Bishops.

Pope Benedict XVI in white cassock with fringed fascia. Note his coat of arms embroidered near the bottom. The cardinal sitting behind him is wearing a plain scarlet fascia.

Fascia (sash)

Sash worn by clerics and seminarians with the cassock in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Anglican Church.

Sash worn by clerics and seminarians with the cassock in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Anglican Church.

Pope Benedict XVI in white cassock with fringed fascia. Note his coat of arms embroidered near the bottom. The cardinal sitting behind him is wearing a plain scarlet fascia.

The fascia worn by cardinals is scarlet-red watered silk.

Coat of arms of Patriarch José de Almeida Neto, featuring the papal tiara

Patriarch of Lisbon

Coat of arms of Patriarch José de Almeida Neto, featuring the papal tiara
Portrait of Patriarch Patrício da Silva (r. 1826–1840), featuring the three-tiered patriarchal mitre that is reminscent of the Papal tiara

The Patriarch of Lisbon (Patriarcha Olisiponensis, Patriarca de Lisboa), also called the Cardinal-Patriarch of Lisbon once he has been made cardinal, is the ordinary bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lisbon.

Catholic Primate (non-cardinal) coat of arms

Primate (bishop)

Title or rank bestowed on some important archbishops in certain Christian churches.

Title or rank bestowed on some important archbishops in certain Christian churches.

Catholic Primate (non-cardinal) coat of arms

The Holy See has also granted Polish primates the privilege of wearing cardinal's crimson attire, except for the skullcap and biretta, even if they have not been made cardinals.

Cardinal de Richelieu by Philippe de Champaigne, 1642 (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg)

Cardinal Richelieu

French clergyman and statesman.

French clergyman and statesman.

Cardinal de Richelieu by Philippe de Champaigne, 1642 (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg)
The young Louis XIII; only a figurehead during his early reign; power actually rested with his mother, Marie de' Medici.
Jean Warin, Cardinal de Richelieu 1622 (obverse), 1631
Cardinal Richelieu by Robert Nanteuil
The Battle of Lens
Cardinal Mazarin (depicted here in 1660, age 58) succeeded Richelieu in office.
Painting by Philippe de Champaigne showing Cardinal Richelieu on his deathbed
Triple Portrait of Cardinal de Richelieu, by Philippe de Champaigne (ca 1642)
Bust of Cardinal Richelieu by Gianlorenzo Bernini
The Richelieu Bacchus continued to be admired by neoclassical artists, (Louvre Museum)
Portrait by Philippe de Champaigne, c. 1633-1640
The Parc de Richelieu at Richelieu, Indre-et-Loire
Henri Motte's depiction of Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle.
Letter of Cardinal Richelieu to Claude de Razilly asking him to do everything in his power to relieve Ré Island in the Siege of Saint-Martin-de-Ré, July 1627.
On the "Day of the Dupes" in 1630, it appeared that Marie de Médicis had secured Richelieu's dismissal. Richelieu, however, survived the scheme, and Marie was exiled as a result.

He was also known as l'Éminence rouge, or "the Red Eminence", a term derived from the title "Eminence" applied to cardinals, and the red robes they customarily wore.

Roman Catholic deacon wearing a dalmatic

Dalmatic

Long, wide-sleeved tunic, which serves as a liturgical vestment in the Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, United Methodist, and some other churches.

Long, wide-sleeved tunic, which serves as a liturgical vestment in the Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican, United Methodist, and some other churches.

Roman Catholic deacon wearing a dalmatic
Ornately embroidered dalmatic (shown from the back with an appareled amice)
A deacon in a dalmatic and a biretta
Bishop wearing a sakkos
Dalmatic Roman usage (with its closed sleeves)
Baroque dalmatic (with slit, flap-like sleeves common for dalmatics worn outside Italy)
Capa pluvial (cope) and ornately embroidered dalmatic pairs (late 1800s, early 1900s, Our Lady of Manaoag museum, Philippines)

At solemn papal liturgical occasions the Pope is assisted by two cardinal-deacons vested in a dalmatic and wearing a mitra simplex (simple white mitre).

Tommaso Maria Zigliara

Tommaso Maria Zigliara, OP (29 October 1833 – 11 May 1893) was a Corsican priest of the Catholic Church, a member of the Dominicans, a theologian, philosopher and a cardinal.

Roman tonsure (Catholicism)

Tonsure

Practice of cutting or shaving some or all of the hair on the scalp as a sign of religious devotion or humility.

Practice of cutting or shaving some or all of the hair on the scalp as a sign of religious devotion or humility.

Roman tonsure (Catholicism)
Celtic stone head from ancient Bohemia (150–50 BC), possibly depicting the form of the later Celtic Christian tonsure
St Bartholomew (by Carlo Crivelli, 1473, in the Ascoli Piceno Cathedral)
Clerical tonsure (note the scissors in the bishop's hands) of an Orthodox man in conjunction with ordination to minor orders.
A baby's first haircut, which is often a head shave, is a common rite of passage in Hinduism. It is called Caula, Chudakarana or Mundana sanskara.

The zuchetto is worn by the pope (in white), cardinals (in red) and bishops (in purple) both during and outside of formal religious ceremonies.

Laghi (right) meets Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Pio Laghi

Laghi (right) meets Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Pio Laghi (21 May 1922 – 10 January 2009) was an Italian Cardinal of the Catholic Church.

1922 papal conclave

Held following Pope Benedict XV's death from pneumonia on 22 January 1922 after a reign of eight years.

Held following Pope Benedict XV's death from pneumonia on 22 January 1922 after a reign of eight years.

Pius XI makes his first public appearance in 1922. The coat of arms on the banner is that of Pope Pius IX

Three of the remaining 60 cardinals did not attend the conclave for reasons of health: José María Martín de Herrera y de la Iglesia, Giuseppe Antonio Ermenegildo Prisco, and Lev Skrbenský z Hříště.