Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

CPRresuscitationmouth-to-mouth resuscitationresuscitateresuscitatedcardiac massagecardio-pulmonary resuscitationchest compressionsheart massagecardiac resuscitation
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions often with artificial ventilation in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest.wikipedia
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Cardiac arrest

sudden cardiac deathsudden deathcardiopulmonary arrest
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions often with artificial ventilation in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest.
Treatment for cardiac arrest includes immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and, if a shockable rhythm is present, defibrillation.

Artificial ventilation

artificial respirationmouth-to-mouth resuscitationkiss of life
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions often with artificial ventilation in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest.
This method of insufflation has been proved more effective than methods which involve mechanical manipulation of the patient's chest or arms, such as the Silvester method.

Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

rescue breathingkiss of lifemouth-to-mouth
The rescuer may also provide artificial ventilation by either exhaling air into the subject's mouth or nose (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) or using a device that pushes air into the subject's lungs (mechanical ventilation).
It is used on a patient with a beating heart or as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to achieve the internal respiration.

Defibrillation

defibrillatordefibrillatorsdefibrillate
Administration of an electric shock to the subject's heart, termed defibrillation, is usually needed in order to restore a viable or "perfusing" heart rhythm. CPR oxygenates the body and brain for defibrillation and advanced life support.
Defibrillation is often an important step in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Pulseless electrical activity

Electromechanical dissociationPEApulseless electrical activity (PEA)
Defibrillation is effective only for certain heart rhythms, namely ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, rather than asystole or pulseless electrical activity.
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the first treatment for PEA, while potential underlying causes are identified and treated.

Ventricular fibrillation

fibrillationV-fibventricular fibrillation VF
Defibrillation is effective only for certain heart rhythms, namely ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, rather than asystole or pulseless electrical activity.
Treatment is with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation.

Asystole

flatlinesasystolicasystolic event
Defibrillation is effective only for certain heart rhythms, namely ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, rather than asystole or pulseless electrical activity.
Asystole is treated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) combined with an intravenous vasopressor such as epinephrine (a.k.a. adrenaline).

Advanced life support

ALSAdvanced Life Support (ALS)advanced
CPR oxygenates the body and brain for defibrillation and advanced life support.
ALS is a treatment consensus for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest and related medical problems, as agreed in Europe by the European Resuscitation Council, most recently in 2010.

ABC (medicine)

ABCairway, breathing, and circulationABCDE
The order of interventions was changed for all age groups except newborns from airway, breathing, chest compressions (ABC) to chest compressions, airway, breathing (CAB).
The protocol was originally developed as a memory aid for rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the most widely known use of the initialism is in the care of the unconscious or unresponsive patient, although it is also used as a reminder of the priorities for assessment and treatment of patients in many acute medical and trauma situations, from first-aid to hospital medical treatment.

Ventricular tachycardia

polymorphic ventricular tachycardiapulseless ventricular tachycardiamonomorphic ventricular tachycardia
Defibrillation is effective only for certain heart rhythms, namely ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, rather than asystole or pulseless electrical activity.
In those in cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation is recommended.

International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation

ILCOR
In 2010, the American Heart Association and International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation updated their CPR guidelines.
The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) was formed in 1992 to provide an opportunity for the major organizations in resuscitation to work together on CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and ECC (Emergency Cardiovascular Care) protocols.

Drowning

drowneddrowndrowns
Other exceptions besides children include cases of drownings and drug overdose.
In those whose heart is not beating and who have been underwater for less than an hour CPR is recommended.

Return of spontaneous circulation

return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)ROSC
In general, CPR is continued until the person has a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or is declared dead.
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation increase the chances of ROSC.

Another One Bites the Dust

Another One Bites the Dust (The Miami Project Remixes)Another One Bites the Dust (Small Soldiers remix)Another Slob Bites the Dust
One can also hum Queen's "Another One Bites The Dust", which is 110 beats-per-minute and contains a memorable repeating drum pattern.
"Another One Bites the Dust" was used in a study to train medical professionals to provide the correct number of chest compressions per minute while performing CPR.

Stayin' Alive

Stayin AliveStaying AliveBernard Lupe
As per the American Heart Association, the beat of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive" provides an ideal rhythm in terms of beats per minute to use for hands-only CPR.
"Stayin' Alive" was used in a study to train medical professionals to provide the correct number of chest compressions per minute while performing CPR.

AutoPulse

and AutoPulse.
The AutoPulse is an automated, portable, battery-powered cardiopulmonary resuscitation device created by Revivant and subsequently purchased and currently manufactured by ZOLL Medical Corporation.

American Heart Association

American Stroke AssociationAHAAmerican Heart Association (AHA)
In 2010, the American Heart Association and International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation updated their CPR guidelines. As per the American Heart Association, the beat of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive" provides an ideal rhythm in terms of beats per minute to use for hands-only CPR.
The campaign's aim is to teach 12- to 15-year-olds fun ways to learn the basics of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and how to use an automated external defibrillator.

Air medical services

air ambulanceaeromedicalair ambulances
There are several advantages to automated devices: they allow rescuers to focus on performing other interventions; they do not fatigue and begin to perform less effective compressions, as humans do; they are able to perform effective compressions in limited-space environments such as air ambulances, where manual compressions are difficult, and they allow ambulance workers to be strapped in safely rather than standing over a patient in a speeding vehicle.
Common equipment for air ambulances includes medications, ventilators, ECGs and monitoring units, CPR equipment, and stretchers.

Resuscitation Council (UK)

Resuscitation CouncilUK Resuscitation CouncilResuscitation Council UK
As of 2010 the Resuscitation Council (UK) still recommends ABC for children.
The Resuscitation Council (UK) is the United Kingdom body responsible for setting central standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related disciplines, and is a member of the European Resuscitation Council, which in turn is part of the international standards body, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation or 'ILCOR'.

Hypothermia

exposurehypothermiclow body temperature
Hypothermia seems to protect by slowing down metabolic and physiologic processes, greatly decreasing the tissues' need for oxygen.
In those without a pulse, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is indicated along with the above measures.

Blunt trauma

blunt force traumabluntblunt-force trauma
These chest compressions create significant local blunt trauma, risking bruising or fracture of the sternum or ribs.
In rare cases, this injury has been attributed to medical techniques such as the Heimlich Maneuver, attempts at CPR and manual thrusts to clear an airway.

Cough CPR

A form of "self-CPR" termed "cough CPR" was the subject of a hoax chain e-mail entitled "How to Survive a Heart Attack When Alone," which wrongly cited "ViaHealth Rochester General Hospital" as the source of the technique.
Cough CPR is the subject of a hoax email that began circulating in 1999.

Resusci Anne

For this reason, training is always done with a manikin, such as the well-known Resusci Anne model.
Resusci Anne, also known as Rescue Anne, Resusci Annie, CPR Annie, or Resuscitation Annie, is a model of training manikin used for teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to both emergency workers and members of the general public.

Sternum

manubriumbreastbonesternal
These chest compressions create significant local blunt trauma, risking bruising or fracture of the sternum or ribs.
Improperly performed chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can cause the xiphoid process to snap off, driving it into the liver which can cause a fatal hemorrhage.

William B. Kouwenhoven

William Bennett KouwenhovenWilliam Kouwenhoven
Jude and Knickerbocker, along with William Kouwenhoven and Joseph S. Redding had recently discovered the method of external chest compressions, whereas Safar had worked with Redding and James Elam to prove the effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
William Bennet Kouwenhoven (13 January 1886 – 10 November 1975), also known as the "Father of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation," is famous for his development of the closed-chest cardiac massage and his invention of the cardiac defibrillator.