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Weizsäcker in 1993
Max Planck, after whom the society is named.
Von Weizsäcker in 1983
Entrance of the administrative headquarters of the Max Planck Society in Munich

From 1970 to 1980, he was head of the Max Planck Institute for the Research of Living Conditions in the Modern World in Starnberg.

- Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker

Max Planck Institute for the Study of the Scientific-Technical World in Starnberg (from 1970 until 1981 (closed)) directed by Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker and Jürgen Habermas.

- Max Planck Society
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Heisenberg in 1933

Werner Heisenberg

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German theoretical physicist and one of the key pioneers of quantum mechanics.

German theoretical physicist and one of the key pioneers of quantum mechanics.

Heisenberg in 1933
Heisenberg in 1924
A visual representation of an induced nuclear fission event where a slow-moving neutron is absorbed by the nucleus of a uranium-235 atom, which fissions into two fast-moving lighter elements (fission products) and additional neutrons. Most of the energy released is in the form of the kinetic velocities of the fission products and the neutrons.
Replica of the German experimental nuclear reactor captured and dismantled at Haigerloch
Bust of Heisenberg in his old age, on display at the Max Planck Society campus in Garching bei München

At various times they included Erich Bagge, Felix Bloch, Ugo Fano, Siegfried Flügge, William Vermillion Houston, Friedrich Hund, Robert S. Mulliken, Rudolf Peierls, George Placzek, Isidor Isaac Rabi, Fritz Sauter, John C. Slater, Edward Teller, John Hasbrouck van Vleck, Victor Frederick Weisskopf, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, Gregor Wentzel, and Clarence Zener.

Following the Kaiser Wilhelm Society's obliteration by the Allied Control Council and the establishment of the Max Planck Society in the British zone, Heisenberg became the director of the Max Planck Institute for Physics.

Aerial view of the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics with assembly hall (left) and lecture hall (right)

Max Planck Institute for Physics

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Physics institute in Munich, Germany that specializes in high energy physics and astroparticle physics.

Physics institute in Munich, Germany that specializes in high energy physics and astroparticle physics.

Aerial view of the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics with assembly hall (left) and lecture hall (right)

It is part of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft and is also known as the Werner Heisenberg Institute, after its first director in its current location.

In 1946, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker and Karl Wirtz joined the faculty as the directors for theoretical and experimental physics, respectively.

Otto Hahn

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German chemist who was a pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry.

German chemist who was a pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry.

William Ramsay, London 1905
Ernest Rutherford at McGill University, Montreal 1905
Hahn and Meitner, 1913, in the chemical laboratory of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry. When a colleague she did not recognise said that they had met before, Meitner replied: "You probably mistake me for Professor Hahn."
Physicists and chemists in Berlin in 1920. Front row, left to right: Hertha Sponer, Albert Einstein, Ingrid Franck, James Franck, Lise Meitner, Fritz Haber, and Otto Hahn. Back row, left to right: Walter Grotrian, Wilhelm Westphal,
Otto von Baeyer, Peter Pringsheim and Gustav Hertz
Former Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry building in Berlin. Heavily damaged by bombing during the Second World War, it was restored and became part of the Free University of Berlin. It was renamed the Otto Hahn Building in 1956, and the Hahn-Meitner Building in 2010.
Marble plaque in Latin by Professor Massimo Ragnolini, commemorating the honeymoon of Otto Hahn and his wife Edith at Punta San Vigilio, Lake Garda, Italy, in March and April 1913
Hahn in uniform in 1915.
The decay chain of actinium. Alpha decay shifts two elements down; beta decay shifts one element up.
Decay chain of uranium-238
This was touted for many years as the table and experimental apparatus with which Otto Hahn discovered nuclear fission in 1938. The table and instruments are representative of the ones used, but not necessarily the originals, and would not have been together on the one table in the same room. Pressure from historians, scientists and feminists caused the museum to alter the display in 1988 to acknowledge Lise Meitner, Otto Frisch and Fritz Strassmann.
Otto Hahn's notebook
Plaque commemorating Hahn and Strassmann's discovery of fission in Berlin (unveiled in 1956)
Farm Hall (seen here in 2015)
5 DM coin, Germany, honouring Hahn and his discovery of fission, 1979
Monument in Berlin-Dahlem, in front of the Otto-Hahn-Platz
Otto Hahn with his wife Edith, 1959
Otto Hahn on a stamp of the German Democratic Republic, 1979
Bust by Knud Knudsen
Hahn's grave in Göttingen

Hahn served as the last president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of Science in 1946 and as the founding president of its successor, the Max Planck Society from 1948 to 1960.

Not until 1936 was Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker able to provide a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon.