Carnivora

carnivorescarnivorancarnivoranscarnivoremammalian carnivorescarnivorouscarnivorous mammalswild carnivores.carnivoran mammals
Carnivora (from Latin carō (stem carn-) "flesh" and vorāre "to devour") is a diverse scrotiferan order that includes over 280 species of placental mammals.wikipedia
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Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
Carnivora (from Latin carō (stem carn-) "flesh" and vorāre "to devour") is a diverse scrotiferan order that includes over 280 species of placental mammals.
The next three are the Primates (apes, monkeys, and others), the Cetartiodactyla (cetaceans and even-toed ungulates), and the Carnivora (cats, dogs, seals, and others).

Least weasel

weaselMustela nivalisweasels
Carnivorans are the most diverse in size of any mammalian order, ranging from the least weasel (Mustela nivalis), at as little as 25 g and 11 cm, to the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), which can weigh up to 1000 kg, to the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), whose adult males weigh up to 5000 kg and measure up to 6.7 m in length.
The least weasel (Mustela nivalis), little weasel, common weasel, or simply weasel in the UK and much of the world, is the smallest member of the genus Mustela, family Mustelidae and order Carnivora.

Southern elephant seal

Mirounga leoninaelephant sealSouthern elephant
Carnivorans are the most diverse in size of any mammalian order, ranging from the least weasel (Mustela nivalis), at as little as 25 g and 11 cm, to the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), which can weigh up to 1000 kg, to the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), whose adult males weigh up to 5000 kg and measure up to 6.7 m in length.
It is the largest member of the clade Pinnipedia and the order Carnivora, as well as the largest extant marine mammal that is not a cetacean.

Giant panda

pandagiant pandasAiluropoda melanoleuca
The giant panda is largely a herbivore, but also feeds on fish, eggs, and insects.
Though it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a folivore, with bamboo shoots and leaves making up more than 99% of its diet.

Scrotifera

Carnivora (from Latin carō (stem carn-) "flesh" and vorāre "to devour") is a diverse scrotiferan order that includes over 280 species of placental mammals.
Scrotifera is a clade of placental mammals that comprises the following orders and their common ancestors: Chiroptera, Carnivora, Pholidota, Perissodactyla and Cetartiodactyla, with the latter including the traditional orders Artiodactyla and Cetacea.

Carnassial

carnassialscarnassial teeth carnassials or sectorial
Carnivorans all share the same arrangement of teeth in which the last upper premolar (named P4) and the first lower molar (named m1) have blade-like enamel crowns that work together as carnassial teeth to shear meat.
In modern Carnivora, the carnassials are the modified fourth upper premolar and the first lower molar.

Carnivoramorpha

CarnivoraformescarnivoramorphsCarnivoramorph
Their molecular phylogeny shows the extant Carnivora are a monophyletic group, the crown group of the Carnivoramorpha.
Carnivoramorpha are a clade of mammals that includes the modern order Carnivora.

Miacidae

miacidmiacids
Carnivorans evolved in North America out of members of the family Miacidae (miacids) about 42 million years ago.
Miacids are thought to have evolved into the modern carnivorous mammals of the order Carnivora.

Mustelidae

mustelidmustelidsweasel family
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.
The Mustelidae (from Latin mustela, weasel) are a family of carnivorous mammals, including weasels, badgers, otters, ferrets, martens, minks, and wolverines, among others.

Procyonidae

procyonidprocyonidsraccoon
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.
Procyonidae is a New World family of the order Carnivora.

Claw

talonsclawstalon
Most carnivorans are terrestrial; they usually have strong, sharp claws, typically with five, but never fewer than four, toes on each foot, and well-developed, prominent canine teeth, cheek teeth (premolars, and molars) that generally have cutting edges.
All carnivorans have claws, which vary considerably in length and shape.

Pinniped

sealsealsPinnipedia
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum. Some carnivorans, such as cats and pinnipeds, depend entirely on meat for their nutrition.
Pinnipeds belong to the order Carnivora and their closest living relatives are believed to be bears and the superfamily of musteloids (weasels, raccoons, skunks, and red pandas), having diverged about 50 million years ago.

Ailuridae

ailuridAilurinae
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.
Ailuridae is a family in the mammal order Carnivora.

Felidae

wild catfelidfeline
Some carnivorans, such as cats and pinnipeds, depend entirely on meat for their nutrition. The superfamily Feloidea (or suborder Feliformia)– Felidae (cats), Prionodontidae (Asiatic linsangs), Herpestidae (mongooses), Hyaenidae (hyenas), Viverridae (civets), and Eupleridae (Malagasy carnivorans), as well as the extinct family Nimravidae (paleofelids) – often have spotted, rosetted or striped coats, and tend to be more brilliantly colored than their Canoidean counterparts. Most species are rather plain in coloration, lacking the flashy spotted or rosetted coats like many species of felids and viverrids have.
Felidae is a family of mammals in the order Carnivora, colloquially referred to as cats, and constitutes a clade.

Bear dog

AmphicyonidaeAmphicyonidbear-dog
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.
Amphicyonidae is an extinct family of large terrestrial carnivorans belonging to the suborder Caniformia which inhabited North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa from the Middle Eocene subepoch to the Pliocene epoch 42–2.6 Mya, existing for about.

Eupleridae

euplerideupleridsMalagasy carnivoran
The superfamily Feloidea (or suborder Feliformia)– Felidae (cats), Prionodontidae (Asiatic linsangs), Herpestidae (mongooses), Hyaenidae (hyenas), Viverridae (civets), and Eupleridae (Malagasy carnivorans), as well as the extinct family Nimravidae (paleofelids) – often have spotted, rosetted or striped coats, and tend to be more brilliantly colored than their Canoidean counterparts.
Eupleridae is a family of carnivorans endemic to Madagascar and comprising 10 known living species in seven genera, commonly known as euplerids, Malagasy mongooses or Malagasy carnivorans.

Nimravidae

nimravidnimravidsfalse saber-toothed cat
The superfamily Feloidea (or suborder Feliformia)– Felidae (cats), Prionodontidae (Asiatic linsangs), Herpestidae (mongooses), Hyaenidae (hyenas), Viverridae (civets), and Eupleridae (Malagasy carnivorans), as well as the extinct family Nimravidae (paleofelids) – often have spotted, rosetted or striped coats, and tend to be more brilliantly colored than their Canoidean counterparts.
Nimravidae is an extinct family of mammalian carnivores, sometimes known as false saber-toothed cats, whose fossils are found in North America and Eurasia.

Viverridae

viverridviverridscivet
The superfamily Feloidea (or suborder Feliformia)– Felidae (cats), Prionodontidae (Asiatic linsangs), Herpestidae (mongooses), Hyaenidae (hyenas), Viverridae (civets), and Eupleridae (Malagasy carnivorans), as well as the extinct family Nimravidae (paleofelids) – often have spotted, rosetted or striped coats, and tend to be more brilliantly colored than their Canoidean counterparts. Most species are rather plain in coloration, lacking the flashy spotted or rosetted coats like many species of felids and viverrids have.
Viverrids are the most primitive of all the families of feliform Carnivora and clearly less specialized than the Felidae.

Pack hunter

cooperative huntingpackpacks
Many hunt in packs and are social animals, giving them an advantage over larger prey.
Cooperative hunting is often a major feature of these groups, and it has been theorized that it is a primary basis for the evolution of sociality in the order Carnivora.

Omnivore

omnivorousomnivoresomnivory
Others, such as raccoons and bears, are more omnivorous, depending on the habitat.
For instance, dogs evolved from primarily carnivorous organisms (Carnivora) while pigs evolved from primarily herbivorous organisms (Artiodactyla).

Viverravidae

viverravidviverravidsViverravoidea
Traditionally, the extinct family Viverravidae (viverravids) had been thought to be the earliest carnivorans, with fossil records first appearing in the Paleocene of North America about 60 mya, but recently described evidence from cranial morphology now places them outside the order Carnivora.
They are related to carnivorans, and lived from the early Palaeocene to the Eocene.

Carnivore

carnivorouscarnivorescarnivory
Some carnivorans, such as cats and pinnipeds, depend entirely on meat for their nutrition. Its members are formally referred to as carnivorans, whereas the word "carnivore" (often popularly applied to members of this group) can refer to any meat-eating organism.
"Carnivore" also may refer to the mammalian order Carnivora, but this is somewhat misleading: many, but not all, Carnivora are meat eaters, and even fewer are true obligate carnivores (see below).

Baculum

baculapenis boneos penis
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.

Creodonta

creodontcreodontscreodine
Based on dental features and braincase sizes, it is now known that Carnivora must have evolved from a form even more primitive than Creodonta, and thus these two orders may not even be sister groups.
Because they both possess carnassial teeth, creodonts and carnivorans were once thought to have shared a common ancestor, but given that different teeth are involved in making up the carnassials (both between creodonts and carnivorans and between the main groups of creodonts), this appears to be a case of evolutionary convergence.

Canidae

canidcanidscanine
The superfamily Canoidea (or suborder Caniformia) – Canidae (wolves, dogs and foxes), Mephitidae (skunks and stink badgers), Mustelidae (weasels, badgers, and otters), Procyonidae (raccoons), Ursidae (bears), Ailuridae (red panda), Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walrus), and Phocidae (earless seals) (the last three families formerly classified in the superfamily Pinnipedia) and the extinct family Amphicyonidae (bear-dogs) – are characterized by having nonchambered or partially chambered auditory bullae, nonretractable claws, and a well-developed baculum.
(from Latin, canis, "dog") is a lineage of carnivorans that includes domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, dingoes, and many other extant and extinct dog-like mammals.