Carnivore

carnivorouscarnivorescarnivoryobligate carnivoremeat-eatingobligate carnivorescarnivorsecondary consumerbeast of preyobligate carnivorous
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.wikipedia
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Scavenger

scavengingscavengescavengers
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.
While scavenging generally refers to carnivores feeding on carrion, it is also a herbivorous feeding behavior.

Carnivora

carnivorescarnivorancarnivorans
"Carnivore" also may refer to the mammalian order Carnivora, but this is somewhat misleading: many, but not all, Carnivora are meat eaters, and even fewer are true obligate carnivores (see below).
Its members are formally referred to as carnivorans, whereas the word "carnivore" (often popularly applied to members of this group) can refer to any meat-eating organism.

Omnivore

omnivorousomnivoresomnivory
Omnivores also consume both animal and non-animal food, and, apart from the more general definition, there is no clearly defined ratio of plant to animal material that would distinguish a facultative carnivore from an omnivore. For example, while the Arctic polar bear eats meat almost exclusively (more than 90% of its diet is meat), most species of bears are actually omnivorous, and the giant panda is exclusively herbivorous.
For instance, dogs evolved from primarily carnivorous organisms (Carnivora) while pigs evolved from primarily herbivorous organisms (Artiodactyla).

Bear

Ursidaebearsursine
For example, while the Arctic polar bear eats meat almost exclusively (more than 90% of its diet is meat), most species of bears are actually omnivorous, and the giant panda is exclusively herbivorous.
While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets.

List of feeding behaviours

polyphagousMonophagousfeeding behavior
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.

Animal

Animaliaanimalsmetazoa
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.
Animals are categorised into ecological groups depending on how they obtain or consume organic material, including carnivores, herbivores, omnivores, detritivores, and parasites.

Polar bear

polar bearsUrsus maritimuspolar
For example, while the Arctic polar bear eats meat almost exclusively (more than 90% of its diet is meat), most species of bears are actually omnivorous, and the giant panda is exclusively herbivorous.
Due to the absence of human development in its remote habitat, it retains more of its original range than any other extant carnivore.

Insectivore

insectivorousinsectivoresinsect-eating
For example, animals that eat mainly insects and similar invertebrates are called insectivores, while those that eat mainly fish are called piscivores.
An insectivore is a carnivorous plant or animal that eats insects.

Facultative

Animals that depend solely on animal flesh for their nutrient requirements are called obligate carnivores while those that also consume non-animal food are called facultative carnivores.

Obligate

obligately
Animals that depend solely on animal flesh for their nutrient requirements are called obligate carnivores while those that also consume non-animal food are called facultative carnivores.

Herbivore

herbivorousherbivoresherbivory
For example, while the Arctic polar bear eats meat almost exclusively (more than 90% of its diet is meat), most species of bears are actually omnivorous, and the giant panda is exclusively herbivorous.
Carnivores in turn consume herbivores for the same reason, while omnivores can obtain their nutrients from either plants or animals.

Cat

domestic catcatsFelis catus
Obligate carnivores include the axolotl, which consumes mainly worms and larvae in its environment, but if necessary will consume algae, as well as all felids (including the domestic cat) which require a diet of primarily animal flesh and organs.
The cat (Felis catus) is a small carnivorous mammal.

Felidae

wild catfelidfeline
Obligate carnivores include the axolotl, which consumes mainly worms and larvae in its environment, but if necessary will consume algae, as well as all felids (including the domestic cat) which require a diet of primarily animal flesh and organs.
They are all obligate carnivores, and most are solitary predators ambushing or stalking their prey.

Predation

predatorypredatorprey
A carnivore, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.
Carnivores that feed on herbivores are secondary consumers; their predators are tertiary consumers, and so forth.

Hypocarnivore

hypocarnivoroushypo-hypocarnivory
The diet of a hypercarnivore consists of more than 70% meat, that of a mesocarnivore 30–70%, and that of a hypocarnivore less than 30%, with the balance consisting of non-animal foods such as fruits, other plant material, or fungi.
The evolutionary division of carnivory into three groups, including hypercarnivore and mesocarnivore, appears to have occurred about 40 million years ago (mya).

Piscivore

piscivorouspiscivorespiscivory
For example, animals that eat mainly insects and similar invertebrates are called insectivores, while those that eat mainly fish are called piscivores.
A piscivore is a carnivorous animal that eats primarily fish.

Theropoda

theropodtheropodsTheropoda indet.
In the Mesozoic, some theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex were probably obligate carnivores.
Theropods were ancestrally carnivorous, although a number of theropod groups evolved to become herbivores, omnivores, piscivores, and insectivores.

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
"Carnivore" also may refer to the mammalian order Carnivora, but this is somewhat misleading: many, but not all, Carnivora are meat eaters, and even fewer are true obligate carnivores (see below).
Some eat other animals—this is a carnivorous diet (and includes insectivorous diets).

Dinosaur

dinosaursDinosaurianon-avian dinosaurs
In the Mesozoic, some theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex were probably obligate carnivores.
Some were herbivorous, others carnivorous.

Tyrannosaurus

Tyrannosaurus rexT-RexT. rex
In the Mesozoic, some theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex were probably obligate carnivores.
Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail.

Arachidonic acid

arachidonic acid metabolismarachidonatearachidonic
Specifically, cats have high protein requirements and their metabolisms appear unable to synthesize essential nutrients such as retinol, arginine, taurine, and arachidonic acid; thus, in nature, they must consume flesh to supply these nutrients.
Since little or no arachidonic acid is found in common plants, such animals are obligate carnivores; the cat is a common example having inability to desaturate essential fatty acids.

Digestion

digestivedigestdigested
While obligate carnivores might be able to ingest small amounts of plant matter, they lack the necessary physiology required to digest it.
Carnivores have canine teeth which are used to kill and tear meat.

Labyrinthodontia

labyrinthodontlabyrinthodontsamphibians
The first tetrapods, or land-dwelling vertebrates, were piscivorous amphibians known as labyrinthodonts.
They were all carnivorous, initially eating fish and possibly going ashore to feed off washed up carrion of sea animals caught in tidal ponds, only later turning into predators of the large invertebrates of the Devonian at the waters edge.

Mesonychid

MesonychiaMesonychidsmesonychian
In the early-to-mid-Cenozoic, the dominant predator forms were mammals: hyaenodonts, oxyaenids, entelodonts, ptolemaiidans, arctocyonids and mesonychians, representing a great diversity of eutherian carnivores in the northern continents and Africa.
Mesonychia ("middle claws") is an extinct taxon of small- to large-sized carnivorous ungulates related to the cetartiodactyls.

Sparassodonta

sparassodontsparassodontsProthylacinidae
In South America, sparassodonts were dominant, while Australia saw the presence of several marsupial predators, such as the dasyuromorphs and thylacoleonids.
Sparassodonta (from Greek σπαράσσειν [sparassein], to tear, rend; and ὀδούς, gen. ὀδόντος [odous, odontos], tooth) is an extinct order of carnivorous metatherian mammals native to South America.