Carolina Dog

The Carolina dog, also known as a yellow dog, yaller dog, American Dingo, or Dixie Dingo, is a breed of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps.wikipedia
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American Rare Breed Association

ARBAAmerican Rare Breeds Association
A breed standard has also been issued by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA).

Foundation Stock Service

FSSFoundation Stock Service ProgramAmerican Kennel Club Foundation Stock Service
In July 2017, the American Kennel Club (AKC, the largest dog breed registry in the United States) accepted the Carolina Dog breeding program into its Foundation Stock Service (FSS), the first step toward official AKC breed recognition.

Landrace

landracesnatural breedautochthonous
Originally a landrace breed, the Carolina dog was rediscovered living as free-roaming population by I. Lehr Brisbin Jr., though originally documented in American dog-related publications in the 1920s.
Another example of a North American landrace, the Carolina Dog or yellow dog, was developed from dogs originally from Asia; it has also been established now as a standardized breed.

Yellow dog Democrat

yellow dogYellow Dog DemocratsYellow Dog" Democrat
The phrase "yellow dog" may be a reference to a breed of dog known as the Carolina Dog indigenous to the Americas, specifically the Southern United States, and not descended from Eurasian breeds.

Pariah dog

pariah dogspariahroaming dogs
The group includes the Afghan Hound, Azawakh, Basenji, Borzoi, Canaan Dog, Carolina Dog, Chart Polski (Polish Greyhound), Cirneco dell'Etna, Greyhound, Hungarian Greyhound, Ibizan Hound, Irish Wolfhound, New Guinea Singing Dog, Pharaoh Hound, Portuguese Podengo, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Saluki, Scottish Deerhound, Sinhala Hound, Silken Windhound, Sloughi, Spanish Greyhound, Thai Ridgeback, Whippet, and Xoloitzcuintli.

Rare dog breed

rare breedrareRare breed (dog)
New breeds from the wild such as the Carolina Dog are quite rare, compared to attempts at breed creation from man as found in the American Hairless Terrier, which sought to exploit a mutation.

Dingo

dingoesAustralian dingodingos
In contrast, the Australian dingo and the New Guinea singing dog both belong to haplotype A29 which is in the a2 sub-haplogroup, hence there is no genetic relationship in the mtDNA.

Southeastern United States

SoutheastSoutheasternSoutheast United States
The Carolina dog, also known as a yellow dog, yaller dog, American Dingo, or Dixie Dingo, is a breed of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps.

Longleaf pine

Pinus palustrislongleaflongleaf pines
The Carolina dog, also known as a yellow dog, yaller dog, American Dingo, or Dixie Dingo, is a breed of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps.

Taxodium

cypressbald cypressswamp cypress
The Carolina dog, also known as a yellow dog, yaller dog, American Dingo, or Dixie Dingo, is a breed of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps.

Swamp

swampsswamplandsloughs
The Carolina dog, also known as a yellow dog, yaller dog, American Dingo, or Dixie Dingo, is a breed of medium-sized, feral dog that lives mostly in the Southeastern United States, especially in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps.

Selective breeding

artificial selectionselectively bredbreeding
Since 2008, artificial selection efforts to establish them as a standardized breed (usually capitalized as Carolina Dog) has made some progress, with recognition in two smaller national kennel clubs, and acceptance into the breed-establishment program of a major one.

Breed standard

standardbreed standardsstandardized breed
Since 2008, artificial selection efforts to establish them as a standardized breed (usually capitalized as Carolina Dog) has made some progress, with recognition in two smaller national kennel clubs, and acceptance into the breed-establishment program of a major one. Since 1996, Carolina dogs can be registered with the United Kennel Club (UKC), which has published a detailed, formal Carolina Dog breed standard.

Kennel club

kennel clubsNational Kennel Clubregistry body
Since 2008, artificial selection efforts to establish them as a standardized breed (usually capitalized as Carolina Dog) has made some progress, with recognition in two smaller national kennel clubs, and acceptance into the breed-establishment program of a major one.

Genetic admixture

admixtureadmixedadmixture mapping
Carolina dogs show admixture with dog breeds from east Asia.

Glover Morrill Allen

G. M. AllenAllenG.M. Allen
One of the earliest publications to document the "Indian" dogs of North America was an article by Glover Morrill Allen, in 1920.

Greater Antilles

GreaterGreater AntilleanAntillas Mayores
Allen postulated that these "Larger or Common Indian Dogs" were descended from Asian primitive dogs: Allen cites late nineteenth-century studies of skeletal remains of dogs that could be found from Alaska to Florida to the Greater Antilles and westward to the Great Plains, and were excavated from Indian mounds as well:

Great Plains

PlainsSouthern PlainsNorthern Plains
Allen postulated that these "Larger or Common Indian Dogs" were descended from Asian primitive dogs: Allen cites late nineteenth-century studies of skeletal remains of dogs that could be found from Alaska to Florida to the Greater Antilles and westward to the Great Plains, and were excavated from Indian mounds as well:

Ecology

ecologicalecologistecologically
These dogs were publicized by I. Lehr Brisbin Jr., a senior research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, who first came across a Carolina dog while working at the Savannah River Site, which was depopulated and secured of all trespass and traffic for decades beginning in 1950.

University of Georgia

GeorgiaThe University of GeorgiaGeorgia University
These dogs were publicized by I. Lehr Brisbin Jr., a senior research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, who first came across a Carolina dog while working at the Savannah River Site, which was depopulated and secured of all trespass and traffic for decades beginning in 1950.

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

Savannah River Ecology LabSREL
These dogs were publicized by I. Lehr Brisbin Jr., a senior research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, who first came across a Carolina dog while working at the Savannah River Site, which was depopulated and secured of all trespass and traffic for decades beginning in 1950.

Savannah River Site

Savannah River PlantSavannah RiverSavannah River atomic energy facility
These dogs were publicized by I. Lehr Brisbin Jr., a senior research ecologist at the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, who first came across a Carolina dog while working at the Savannah River Site, which was depopulated and secured of all trespass and traffic for decades beginning in 1950.

Breed registry

stud bookstudbookherd-book
Since 1996, Carolina dogs can be registered with the United Kennel Club (UKC), which has published a detailed, formal Carolina Dog breed standard.