Caroline of Ansbach

Queen CarolineCarolinePrincess of WalesCaroline, Princess of WalesCaroline, Queen ConsortPrincess Caroline of AnsbachCaroline of Brandeburg-AnsbachCaroline of Brandenburg-AnsbachCaroline of Great BritainPrincess Caroline
Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737 ) was Queen of Great Britain as the wife of King George II.wikipedia
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Frederick, Prince of Wales

FrederickPrince of WalesPrince Frederick
Her eldest son, Frederick, became Prince of Wales.
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III.

George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of Wales
Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737 ) was Queen of Great Britain as the wife of King George II.
In June 1705, under the false name of "Monsieur de Busch", George visited the Ansbach court at their summer residence in Triesdorf to investigate incognito a marriage prospect: Caroline of Ansbach, the former ward of his aunt Queen Sophia Charlotte of Prussia.

John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach

John FrederickJohn Frederick of Brandenburg-AnsbachJohann Friedrich
Her father, Margrave John Frederick of Brandenburg-Ansbach, belonged to a branch of the House of Hohenzollern and was the ruler of a small German state, the Principality of Ansbach. Caroline was born on 1 March 1683 at Ansbach, the daughter of John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach, and his second wife, Princess Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach.
Their daughter Wilhelmine Charlotte Caroline, Margravine of Brandenburg-Ansbach (Caroline of Ansbach) married George II of Great Britain before he became king.

William Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach

William FrederickMargrave William FrederickMargrave William Frederick of Brandenburg-Ansbach
Caroline and her only full sibling, her younger brother Margrave William Frederick, left Ansbach with their mother, who returned to her native Eisenach.
He was the younger brother of Caroline of Ansbach and thus brother-in-law of George II of Great Britain.

Robert Walpole

Sir Robert WalpoleWalpoleMr. Walpool
Caroline came to be associated with Robert Walpole, an opposition politician who was a former government minister.
Walpole's fellow members, appointed by the Prince of Wales, included William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath – Secretary at War, General Lumley, General Erle and Sir Philip Meadowes – Controller of the Army and Knight Marshal of the King's Palace, whose daughter, Mary Meadows, was Maid-of-honour to Walpole's friend, Queen Caroline.

Princess Amelia of Great Britain

Princess AmeliaAmelia Amelia
Over the next seven years, Caroline had three more children, Anne, Amelia, and Caroline, all of whom were born in Hanover.
Princess Amelia of Great Britain (Amelia Sophia Eleanor; 10 June 1711 (New Style) – 31 October 1786) was the second daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline.

George Frederick II, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach

George Frederick IIGeorge FrederickGeorge Frederick II ''the Younger
The orphaned Caroline and William Frederick returned to Ansbach to stay with their elder half-brother, Margrave George Frederick II.
George Frederick II, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach (3 May 1678 – 29 March 1703), known as George Frederick the Younger, the third son of John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach by his first wife the Margravine Joanna Elisabeth of Baden-Durlach (and thus a half-brother of Queen Caroline of Great Britain), succeeded his elder brother as Margrave of Ansbach in 1692.

Princess Caroline of Great Britain

CarolinePrincess CarolineCaroline Elizabeth
Over the next seven years, Caroline had three more children, Anne, Amelia, and Caroline, all of whom were born in Hanover.
Princess Caroline of Great Britain (Caroline Elizabeth; 10 June 1713 – 28 December 1757) was the fourth child and third daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his wife Caroline of Ansbach.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

LeibnizGottfried LeibnizGottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz
She was renowned for her intelligence and strong character, and her uncensored and liberal court attracted a great many scholars, including philosopher Gottfried Leibniz.
Among the few people in north Germany to accept Leibniz were the Electress Sophia of Hanover (1630–1714), her daughter Sophia Charlotte of Hanover (1668–1705), the Queen of Prussia and his avowed disciple, and Caroline of Ansbach, the consort of her grandson, the future George II.

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
As Princess of Wales, she joined her husband in rallying political opposition to his father King George I.
George and his son were later reconciled at the insistence of Robert Walpole and the desire of the Princess of Wales, who had moved out with her husband but missed her children who had been left in the care of the King.

Princess Mary of Great Britain

MaryMary of Great BritainPrincess Mary
Over the next few years, Caroline had three more children: William, Mary and Louise.
Princess Mary of Great Britain (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was the second-youngest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his wife Caroline of Ansbach, and Landgravine of Hesse-Kassel as the wife of Landgrave Frederick II.

Prince George William of Great Britain

Prince George WilliamGeorge WilliamPrince George William of Wales
Two years after their arrival in England, Caroline suffered a stillbirth, which her friend the Countess of Bückeburg blamed on the incompetence of English doctors, but the following year she had another son, Prince George William.
Prince George William of Great Britain (13 November 1717 – 17 February 1718) was an infant member of the British royal family, second son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach who, at the time of his birth, were the Prince and Princess of Wales.

Louise of Great Britain

LouiseQueen LouisePrincess Louisa
Over the next few years, Caroline had three more children: William, Mary and Louise.
She was the youngest surviving daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach.

Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk

Countess of SuffolkHenrietta HobartHenrietta Howard
His two best-known mistresses were Henrietta Howard, later Countess of Suffolk, and, from 1735, Amalie von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth.
Henrietta met and became mistress to his son, the future George II, and was appointed a Lady of the Bedchamber to his wife, Caroline of Ansbach.

Princess of Wales

Countess of ChesterPrincessthe Princess of Wales
As Princess of Wales, she joined her husband in rallying political opposition to his father King George I.

Ansbach

AnspachKatterbachAnsbach, Bavaria
Caroline and her only full sibling, her younger brother Margrave William Frederick, left Ansbach with their mother, who returned to her native Eisenach. Caroline was born on 1 March 1683 at Ansbach, the daughter of John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach, and his second wife, Princess Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach.
Caroline of Ansbach, (1683–1737), wife of King George II (UK).

Princess Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach

Eleonore Erdmuthe LuiseEleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-EisenachEleanor Erdmuthe Louise
Caroline was born on 1 March 1683 at Ansbach, the daughter of John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach, and his second wife, Princess Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach.
Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737), married George II of Great Britain and had issue.

Richmond, London

RichmondRichmond, SurreyRichmond upon Thames
Further tragedy occurred in 1718, when Caroline miscarried at Richmond Lodge, her country residence.
These were built in 1724 for the maids of honour (trusted royal wardrobe servants) of Queen Caroline, the queen consort of George II.

Kensington Palace

KensingtonHereKensington Palace London
In February, Prince George William fell ill, and the King allowed both George Augustus and Caroline to see him at Kensington Palace without any conditions.
The last reigning monarch to use Kensington Palace was George II, who did not undertake any major structural changes to the palace during his reign, and left the running of the palace to his wife Queen Caroline.

Amalie von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth

Amalie von WallmodenLady YarmouthAmalie Sophie Marianne von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth
His two best-known mistresses were Henrietta Howard, later Countess of Suffolk, and, from 1735, Amalie von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth.
The king ended the necessity of those visits after the death of his wife Caroline of Ansbach in November 1737, sending for the Countess Wallmoden to join him in England, but it did not put an end to Johnson's disapproval.

The Ways of Zion Do Mourn / Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline

Funeral Anthem for Queen CarolineThe ways of Zion do mournFuneral Anthem for Queen Caroline'', HWV 264
George Frideric Handel composed an anthem for the occasion, The Ways of Zion Do Mourn / Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline.
The ways of Zion do mourn / Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline, HWV 264, is an anthem composed by George Frideric Handel.

Caroline County, Virginia

Caroline CountyCarolineCaroline, King George, Spotsylvania
Caroline County in the British Colony of Virginia was named in her honour when it was formed in 1727.
Caroline County was established in 1728 and was named in honor of Caroline of Ansbach, wife of the then reigning king, George II of Great Britain.

Leibniz–Clarke correspondence

famous correspondence
She later facilitated the Leibniz-Clarke correspondence, arguably the most important philosophy of physics discussion of the 18th century.
The exchange began because of a letter Leibniz wrote to Caroline of Ansbach, in which he remarked that Newtonian physics was detrimental to natural theology.

Regency Acts

RegentRegency ActRegency Bill
The Regency Act 1728 made Caroline rather than Frederick regent when her husband was in Hanover for five months from May 1729.
2 c. 27). The Act specified that Queen Caroline would act as regent in the absence of her husband King George II rather than the Prince of Wales, whom he despised.

Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

AugustaPrincess AugustaAugusta, Dowager Princess of Wales
The King and Queen arranged Frederick's marriage, in 1736, to Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.
In 1736, it was proposed that she marry 29-year-old Frederick, Prince of Wales, eldest son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline.