A report on Carrion and Maggot

A wedge-tailed eagle and carrion (roadkill kangaroo) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia
Maggots feeding on an opossum carrion
Flies settling on a sheep carrion
Maggots on a porcupine carcass
A coyote feeding on elk carrion in Yellowstone National Park's Lamar Valley during winter.
Maggots from a rabbit.

Many invertebrates, such as the carrion and burying beetles, as well as maggots of calliphorid flies (such as one of the most important species in Calliphora vomitoria) and flesh-flies, also eat carrion, playing an important role in recycling nitrogen and carbon in animal remains.

- Carrion

Maggot-like fly larvae are of significance in ecology and medicine; among other roles, various species are prominent in recycling carrion and garbage, attacking crops and foodstuffs, spreading microbial infections, and causing myiasis.

- Maggot
A wedge-tailed eagle and carrion (roadkill kangaroo) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia

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Calliphoridae

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The Calliphoridae (commonly known as blow flies, blow-flies, carrion flies, bluebottles, greenbottles, or cluster flies) are a family of insects in the order Diptera, with almost 1,900 known species.

The Calliphoridae (commonly known as blow flies, blow-flies, carrion flies, bluebottles, greenbottles, or cluster flies) are a family of insects in the order Diptera, with almost 1,900 known species.

Close-up of the head of Calliphora vomitoria
A Calliphora livida fly specimen
Calliphora hilli
Calliphora augur
A close-up of the head of a Calliphora

The maggot larvae, often used as fishing bait, are known as gentles.

Blow flies are usually the first insects to come in contact with carrion because they have the ability to smell dead animal matter from up to 1 mi away.