Cartagena, Spain

CartagenaCarthago NovaNew CarthageCarthagenaCartagena, MurciaCartago NovaQart Hadast(Cartagena(Cartagena)Cartagena Navy Yard
Cartagena (Carthago Nova) is a Spanish city and a major naval station located in the Region of Murcia, by the Mediterranean coast, south-eastern Spain.wikipedia
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Cartagena Naval Base

Arsenal de CartagenaCartagenaCartagena Royal Dockyards
Cartagena (Carthago Nova) is a Spanish city and a major naval station located in the Region of Murcia, by the Mediterranean coast, south-eastern Spain.
Cartagena Naval Base, also known as Arsenal of Cartagena, is a military base and arsenal of the Spanish Navy located in the city of Cartagena, Spain.

Hasdrubal the Fair

Hasdrubal
Cartagena has been inhabited for over two millennia, being founded around 227 BC by the Carthaginian Hasdrubal the Fair as Qart Hadasht (Phoenician, meaning 'New Town'), the same name as the original city of Carthage.
Hasdrubal the Fair (, ʿAzrubaʿal; –221BC) was a Carthaginian military leader and politician, governor in Iberia after Hamilcar Barca's death, and founder of Cartagena.

Roman theatre, Cartagena

Roman TheatreRoman Theatre of CartagenaFundación Teatro Romano de Cartagena
The confluence of civilizations as well as its strategic harbour, together with the rise of the local mining industry is manifested by a unique artistic heritage, with a number of landmarks such as the Roman Theatre, the second largest of the Iberian Peninsula after the one in Mérida, an abundance of Phoenician, Roman, Byzantine and Moorish remains, and a plethora of Art Nouveau buildings, a result of the bourgeoisie from the early 20th century.
The Roman Theatre is an ancient Roman theatre in Cartagena, Spain.

Campo de Cartagena

Cartagena
The metropolitan area of Cartagena, known as Campo de Cartagena, has a population of 409,586 inhabitants.
The capital city is Cartagena, the most important Naval Base of the Spanish Navy in the Mediterranean Sea.

Cape Palos

Cabo de PalosCape Pallas
The Cartagena region can be viewed as a great plain inclined slightly in the direction NW-SE, bordered at the north and the northwest by pre-coastal mountain ranges (Carrascoy, El Puerto, Los Villares, Columbares and Escalona), and at the south and southwest by coastal mountain ranges (El Algarrobo, La Muela, Pelayo, Gorda, La Fausilla y Minera, with its last spurs in Cape Palos).
Cape Palos (Cabo de Palos) is a cape in the Spanish municipality of Cartagena, in the region of Murcia.

Almería

AlmeriaAlmería, SpainAlmeria, Spain
A number of surprising Ibero-African species, which are only found in southern Spain (mostly in the provinces of Murcia and Almería) and North Africa.
After the fragmentation of the Caliphate of Córdoba in 1031, Almería continued to be ruled by powerful local Muslim Taifa emirs like Jairan, the first independent Emir of Almería and Cartagena, and Almotacin, the poet emir.

Iberian Peninsula

IberiaIberianPeninsula
The confluence of civilizations as well as its strategic harbour, together with the rise of the local mining industry is manifested by a unique artistic heritage, with a number of landmarks such as the Roman Theatre, the second largest of the Iberian Peninsula after the one in Mérida, an abundance of Phoenician, Roman, Byzantine and Moorish remains, and a plethora of Art Nouveau buildings, a result of the bourgeoisie from the early 20th century.
Their most important colony was Carthago Nova (modern-day Cartagena, Spain).

Anthemis chrysantha

Some species are seriously endangered like the siempreviva de Cartagena (Limonium carthaginense), the rabogato del Mar Menor (Sideritis marmironensis), the zamarrilla de Cartagena (Teucrium carthaginense), the manzanilla de escombreras (Anthemis chrysantha), the garbancillo de Tallante (Astragalus nitidiflorus) and the jara de Cartagena Cistus heterophyllus carthaginensis).
Anthemis chrysantha (known in Spanish as manzanilla de Escombreras or "Escombreras chamomile") is an Ibero-North African annual asteraceae endemism present in a few Cartagenan and Algerian islets and coastal locations.

Tetraclinis

Tetraclinis articulatathuyaAraar
Among these, there stands out Tetraclinis articulata or Sandarac (sabina mora o ciprés de Cartagena—Cartagena's cypress in Spanish) native to Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Malta, and Cartagena, growing at relatively low altitudes in a hot, dry Mediterranean woodland.
It is native to northwestern Africa in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, with two small outlying populations on Malta, and near Cartagena in southeast Spain.

Districts of Cartagena, Spain

district
This cave is located in the district Rincón de San Ginés.
The Spanish municipality of Cartagena has 24 districts, known as diputaciónes (councils).

Hispania

SpainRoman SpainHispano-Roman
The city had its heyday during the Roman Empire, when it was known as Carthago Nova (the New Carthage) and Carthago Spartaria, capital of the province of Carthaginensis.
The frontier between both was a sinuous line which ran from Cartago Nova (now Cartagena) to the Cantabrian Sea.

El Carmolí

El Carmolí is an area in Los Urrutias, Cartagena municipality, in the Campo de Cartagena comarca, Region of Murcia, southeastern Spain.

Cave of Los Aviones

Remains of individuals belonging to the species Homo neanderthalensis and the Mousterian culture were found in the Cave of Los Aviones.
Cave of Los Aviones, located at sea level near Cartagena in southeastern Spain, is a paleontology site dating back to the Middle Paleolithic era.

Astragalus nitidiflorus

Some species are seriously endangered like the siempreviva de Cartagena (Limonium carthaginense), the rabogato del Mar Menor (Sideritis marmironensis), the zamarrilla de Cartagena (Teucrium carthaginense), the manzanilla de escombreras (Anthemis chrysantha), the garbancillo de Tallante (Astragalus nitidiflorus) and the jara de Cartagena Cistus heterophyllus carthaginensis).
It is endemic to Cartagena, southeast of Spain.

Mar Menor

Islas del Mar Menor
Although the city itself is only a port, within the city limits lies part of La Manga del Mar Menor (the other part belonging to the municipality of San Javier) which encompasses the Mar Menor.
The Mediterranean Sea is also called "Larger Sea [Mar Mayor] in the region) is a coastal saltwater lagoon in the Iberian Peninsula located south-east of the Autonomous Community of Murcia, Spain, near Cartagena.

Phoenicia

PhoeniciansPhoenicianPhoenicio
The confluence of civilizations as well as its strategic harbour, together with the rise of the local mining industry is manifested by a unique artistic heritage, with a number of landmarks such as the Roman Theatre, the second largest of the Iberian Peninsula after the one in Mérida, an abundance of Phoenician, Roman, Byzantine and Moorish remains, and a plethora of Art Nouveau buildings, a result of the bourgeoisie from the early 20th century.

Los Nietos, Cartagena

Los Nietos
The following villages are part of Cartagena municipality: La Azohía, Isla Plana, Los Urrutias and Los Nietos.
It has over 40 km of sandy beaches, a casino, hotels, and is close to the airport, Murcia central, and to one of the oldest cities in Spain, Cartagena.

Mastia

The town was originally named Mastia.
It has traditionally been associated with the city of Cartagena (Spain).

Roman Catholic Diocese of Cartagena

Bishop of CartagenaDiocese of CartagenaBishop of Cartagena (en España)
King Alfonso X of Castile (Alfonso the Wise) conquered Cartagena in 1245; he established Christian rule and the Bishopric of Cartagena.
The Diocese of Cartagena (Carthaginen(sis) in Hispania) is the diocese of the city of Cartagena in the Ecclesiastical province of Granada in Spain.

Scipio Africanus

ScipioPublius Cornelius Scipio AfricanusPublius Cornelius Scipio
The Roman general Scipio Africanus conquered it in 209 BC and renamed it as Carthago Nova (literally "New New City") to distinguish it from the mother city.
Scipio landed at the mouth of the Ebro and was able to surprise and capture Carthago Nova (New Carthage), the headquarters of the Carthaginian power in Hispania.

Mediterranean Sea

MediterraneanMediterranean coastWestern Mediterranean
Cartagena (Carthago Nova) is a Spanish city and a major naval station located in the Region of Murcia, by the Mediterranean coast, south-eastern Spain.

Cantonal rebellion

Cantonal RevolutionCantonalistan insurrection in 1873
In 1873, the city established a self-governing government and become the center of the Cantonal Revolution.
The Cantonal rebellion was a cantonalist uprising that took place during the First Spanish Republic, starting on July 12 of 1873 in Cartagena.

Fuente Álamo de Murcia

Fuente ÁlamoFuente Alamo de MurciaFuente-Álamo
Its metropolitan area, which includes the municipalities of La Unión, Fuente Álamo de Murcia, Los Alcázares, San Javier, Torre Pacheco, San Pedro del Pinatar and Mazarrón, has a total of 390,983 inhabitants.
It is situated 22 km northwest of Cartagena and 35 km south west of Murcia.

Spanish Republican Navy

NavyRepublican NavyAeronáutica Naval
During the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939), Cartagena was the main base of the Spanish Republican Navy and one of the primary strongholds of the Republican Government.
The main naval bases of the Spanish Republican Navy were Ferrol (Northern Coast), Cádiz (Southern Coast) and Cartagena (Eastern Coast).

Hispania Carthaginensis

CarthaginensisCarthaginensis provinceCarthaginiensis
The city had its heyday during the Roman Empire, when it was known as Carthago Nova (the New Carthage) and Carthago Spartaria, capital of the province of Carthaginensis.
The capital of the new province was settled in Carthago Nova, now Cartagena.