Case law

casecasesdecisioncourt casejurisprudencecase-lawadjudicated casesDecisional lawlegal cases law
Case law is the collection of past legal decisions written by courts and similar tribunals in the course of deciding cases, in which the law was analyzed using these cases to resolve ambiguities for deciding current cases.wikipedia
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Common law

common-lawcourts of common lawcommon
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law. In the common law tradition, courts decide the law applicable to a case by interpreting statutes and applying precedents which record how and why prior cases have been decided.
In these countries, common law is considered synonymous with case law.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law.
The Constitution of the United Kingdom is uncodified and consists mostly of a collection of disparate written sources, including statutes, judge-made case law and international treaties, together with constitutional conventions.

Precedent

stare decisislegal precedentbinding precedent
These past decisions are called "case law", or precedent. In the common law tradition, courts decide the law applicable to a case by interpreting statutes and applying precedents which record how and why prior cases have been decided.
Case law, in common-law jurisdictions, is the set of decisions of adjudicatory tribunals or other rulings that can be cited as precedent.

Regulatory law

regulatoryregulations
These judicial interpretations are distinguished from statutory law, which are codes enacted by legislative bodies, and regulatory law, which are established by executive agencies based on statutes.
Regulatory law contrasts to statutory law promulgated by the legislative branch, and common law or case law promulgated by the judicial branch.

Statute

statutorystatutesAct
By contrast, decisions in civil law jurisdictions are generally shorter, referring only to statutes.
Statutes are rules made by legislative bodies; they are distinguished from case law or precedent, which is decided by courts, and regulations issued by government agencies.

Halsbury's Laws of England

Halsbury's LawsHalsbury’s Laws of EnglandHalsbury Legal Awards
Widely cited non-binding sources include legal encyclopedias such as Corpus Juris Secundum and Halsbury's Laws of England, or the published work of the Law Commission or the American Law Institute.
It has an alphabetised title scheme covering all areas of law, drawing on authorities including Acts of the United Kingdom, Measures of the Welsh Assembly, UK case law and European law.

Legal case

casecourt casecases
In the common law tradition, courts decide the law applicable to a case by interpreting statutes and applying precedents which record how and why prior cases have been decided.

American Law Institute

The American Law InstituteALIA.L.I.
Widely cited non-binding sources include legal encyclopedias such as Corpus Juris Secundum and Halsbury's Laws of England, or the published work of the Law Commission or the American Law Institute.
Restatements are essentially codifications of case law, common law judge-made doctrines that develop gradually over time because of the principle of stare decisis.

Legal opinion

opinionopinionsdecisions
* Legal opinion
Published opinions of courts are also collectively referred to as case law, and constitute in the common law legal systems one of the major sources of law.

Tribunal

tribunalsadjudicative tribunalMixed Courts
Case law is the collection of past legal decisions written by courts and similar tribunals in the course of deciding cases, in which the law was analyzed using these cases to resolve ambiguities for deciding current cases.

Statutory law

statute lawstatutorystatute
These judicial interpretations are distinguished from statutory law, which are codes enacted by legislative bodies, and regulatory law, which are established by executive agencies based on statutes.

Adjudication

adjudicateadjudicatedadjudicative
In some jurisdictions, case law can be applied to ongoing adjudication; for example, criminal proceedings or family law.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
In common law countries (including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), the term case law is a near-exact synonym for common law.

Judgment (law)

judgmentjudgmentsdecision
It is used for judicial decisions of selected appellate courts, courts of first instance, agency tribunals, and other bodies discharging adjudicatory functions.

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
It is used for judicial decisions of selected appellate courts, courts of first instance, agency tribunals, and other bodies discharging adjudicatory functions.

Trial court

court of first instancefirst instancecourts of first instance
It is used for judicial decisions of selected appellate courts, courts of first instance, agency tribunals, and other bodies discharging adjudicatory functions.

High Court

High Court JudgeThe High CourtAccra High Court
For example, in England, the High Court and the Court of Appeal s are each bound by their own previous decisions, however, since 1966 the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom can deviate from its earlier decisions, although in practice it rarely does.

Appellate court

Court of AppealCourt of Appealsappeals court
It is used for judicial decisions of selected appellate courts, courts of first instance, agency tribunals, and other bodies discharging adjudicatory functions. For example, in England, the High Court and the Court of Appeal s are each bound by their own previous decisions, however, since 1966 the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom can deviate from its earlier decisions, although in practice it rarely does.

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

Supreme CourtUK Supreme CourtUnited Kingdom Supreme Court
For example, in England, the High Court and the Court of Appeal s are each bound by their own previous decisions, however, since 1966 the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom can deviate from its earlier decisions, although in practice it rarely does.

R v Jogee

Ruddock v The Queenjoint enterprise
A notable example of when the court has overturned its precedent is, in the case of R v Jogee; where the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom ruled that they and the other courts of England and Wales had misapplied the law for nearly 30 years.

Court of record

courts of recordrecordof record
Generally speaking, higher courts do not have direct oversight over the lower courts of record, in that they cannot reach out on their initiative (sua sponte) at any time to overrule judgments of the lower courts.

Appeal

appellateappellantwrit of error
If a judge acts against precedent, and the case is not appealed, the decision will stand.