Castilla elastica

rubber tree
Castilla elastica, the Panama rubber tree, is a tree native to the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.wikipedia
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Latex

latex rubbermilkrubber latex
It was the principal source of latex among the Mesoamerican peoples in pre-Columbian times.
This method of formation is found in the poppy family and in the rubber trees (Para rubber tree, members of the family Euphorbiaceae, members of the mulberry and fig family, such as the Panama rubber tree Castilla elastica), and members of the family Asteraceae.

Natural rubber

rubberIndia rubbercaoutchouc
The latex gathered from Castilla elastica was converted into usable rubber by mixing the latex with the juice of the morning glory species Ipomoea alba which, conveniently, is typically found in the wild as a vine climbing Castilla elastica.
Others that have been commercially exploited, or at least showed promise as rubber sources, include the rubber fig (Ficus elastica), Panama rubber tree (Castilla elastica), various spurges (Euphorbia spp.), lettuce (Lactuca species), the related Scorzonera tau-saghyz, various Taraxacum species, including common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) and Russian dandelion (Taraxacum kok-saghyz), and perhaps most importantly for its hypoallergenic properties, guayule (Parthenium argentatum).

Mesoamerican ballgame

ball courtsballcourtMesoamerican ball game
The rubber produced by this method found several uses, including most notably, the manufacture of balls for the Mesoamerican ballgame ōllamaliztli.
It is not known precisely when or where ōllamaliztli originated, although it is likely that the game originated earlier than 1400 BCE in the low-lying tropical zones home to the rubber tree.

Morning glory

morning gloriescoast morning gloryflower
The latex gathered from Castilla elastica was converted into usable rubber by mixing the latex with the juice of the morning glory species Ipomoea alba which, conveniently, is typically found in the wild as a vine climbing Castilla elastica.
Ancient Mesoamerican civilizations used the morning glory species Ipomoea alba to convert the latex from the Castilla elastica tree and also the guayule plant to produce bouncing rubber balls.

Ipomoea alba

I. albaI. bona-noxIpomoea bona-nox
The latex gathered from Castilla elastica was converted into usable rubber by mixing the latex with the juice of the morning glory species Ipomoea alba which, conveniently, is typically found in the wild as a vine climbing Castilla elastica.
The Mesoamerican civilizations used the Ipomoea alba morning glory to convert the latex from the Castilla elastica tree to produce bouncing rubber balls.

Parthenium argentatum

guayuleP. argentatum
In pre-Columbian times, the guayule was a secondary source of latex for rubber, the principal source being the Castilla elastica tree.

Hevea brasiliensis

rubber treerubber treesrubber
The Olmec people of Mesoamerica extracted and produced similar forms of primitive rubber from analogous latex-producing trees such as Castilla elastica as early as 3,600 years ago.

Olmecs

OlmecOlmec civilizationgallery below
The Aztec (Nahuatl) word for rubber was ulli / olli, from which their word for the ballgame derived), and also their name for the ancient people they associated with the origin of the ballgame, the Olmecs (olmeca: "rubber people").
The term "rubber people" refers to the ancient practice, spanning from ancient Olmecs to Aztecs, of extracting latex from Castilla elastica, a rubber tree in the area.

Tropics

tropicaltropictropical zone
Castilla elastica, the Panama rubber tree, is a tree native to the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
Castilla elastica, the Panama rubber tree, is a tree native to the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.

Central America

CentralCentral AmericanCentral American Isthmus
Castilla elastica, the Panama rubber tree, is a tree native to the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.

South America

South AmericanSouthSouth-America
Castilla elastica, the Panama rubber tree, is a tree native to the tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.

Mesoamerica

MesoamericanMeso-AmericanMeso-America
It was the principal source of latex among the Mesoamerican peoples in pre-Columbian times.

Pre-Columbian era

pre-Columbianpre-Hispanicprehispanic
It was the principal source of latex among the Mesoamerican peoples in pre-Columbian times.

Vine

climberclimbing plantclimbers
The latex gathered from Castilla elastica was converted into usable rubber by mixing the latex with the juice of the morning glory species Ipomoea alba which, conveniently, is typically found in the wild as a vine climbing Castilla elastica.

Aztecs

AztecAztec EmpireMexica
The Aztec (Nahuatl) word for rubber was ulli / olli, from which their word for the ballgame derived), and also their name for the ancient people they associated with the origin of the ballgame, the Olmecs (olmeca: "rubber people").

Nahuatl

Nahuatl languageNáhuatlNahua
The Aztec (Nahuatl) word for rubber was ulli / olli, from which their word for the ballgame derived), and also their name for the ancient people they associated with the origin of the ballgame, the Olmecs (olmeca: "rubber people").

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
The Nahuatl word for the tree of Castilla elastica is olicuáhuitl; in Spanish it is known as palo de hule.

Soconusco

XoconoscoSoconusco regionXoconochco
Abundant moisture and volcanic soil has always made it rich for agriculture, contributing to the flowering of the Mokaya and Olmec cultures, that were based on Theobroma cacao and rubber of Castilla elastica.

Mesoamerican rubber balls

Rubber ballrubber balls
Ancient rubber was made from latex of the rubber tree (Castilla elastica), which is indigenous to the tropical areas of southern Mexico and Central America.

Santa Marta montane forests

On the drier western side forests at elevations from 800 to 1000 m above sea level have large trees including Poulsenia armata, red ucuuba (Virola sebifera), Pterygota colombiana, muskwood (Guarea guidonia), Panama rubber tree (Castilla elastica), Ficus macrosyce, avocado (Persea americana) and Andean royal palm (Dictyocaryum lamarckianum).

Chocó-Darién moist forests

Choco-Darien moist forestsChocóEl Chocó
Generally the lowland rain forests in the north hold trees associated with cow tree (Brosimum utile), with groves of bongo (Cavanillesia platanifolia), wild cashew (Anacardium excelsum), Panama rubber (Castilla elastica), snakewood or bastard breadnut (Brosimum guianense), Bombacopsis species, kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra) and tonka bean (Dipteryx oleifera).

Moraceae

mulberry familyMoraceae sp.mulberry
Except for Brosimum gaudichaudii and Castilla elastica, the perianth in all species of the Moraceae contain sepals.

Mazatán, Chiapas

MazatánCanton CorralitoMazatan, Chiapas
Pre-Olmec civilization evolved around 2000 BC with early importation (from Amazon) and development of cacao and Castilla elastica by the Mokaya people with construction of mounds and platforms.