Castlemorton Common Festival

CastlemortonCastlemorton CommonCastlemorton rave
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.wikipedia
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Rave

rave culturerave musicraves
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.
While some raves may be small parties held at nightclubs or private homes, some raves have grown to immense size, such as the large festivals and events featuring multiple DJs and dance areas (e.g., the Castlemorton Common Festival in 1992).

Free party

free partiesfree festivalsquat parties
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.
After sensational coverage in the tabloids, culminating in a particularly large rave (near Castlemorton) in May 1992, the government acted on what was depicted as a growing menace.

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994

Criminal Justice and Public Order BillCriminal Justice ActCriminal Justice and Public Order Act
The media interest and controversy surrounding the festival, and concerns as to the way it was policed, inspired the legislation that would eventually become the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.
A main motivation was to restrict outdoor rave parties, in particular in reaction to the 1992 Castlemorton Common Festival.

New Age travellers

travellerstravellerConvoy
As a result, hundreds of new age travellers en-route to the area for the expected festival were shunted into neighbouring counties by Avon and Somerset’s Operation Nomad police manoeuvres, with West Mercia Police deciding to confine them to common land at Castlemorton.
Later events included the Castlemorton Common Festival, a huge free and unlicensed event which attracted widespread media coverage and prompted government action.

Spiral Tribe

Castlemorton hosted many of the large sound systems of the time such as Bedlam, Circus Warp, Spiral Tribe and DiY Sound System, and bands such as Back To The Planet, Xenophobia (fronted by Spiral Tribe's MC Skallywag), AOS3 and Poisoned Electrick Head.
They are best known for their involvement in the infamous Castlemorton Common Festival.

DiY Sound System

DiYthe DiY Sound System
Castlemorton hosted many of the large sound systems of the time such as Bedlam, Circus Warp, Spiral Tribe and DiY Sound System, and bands such as Back To The Planet, Xenophobia (fronted by Spiral Tribe's MC Skallywag), AOS3 and Poisoned Electrick Head.
This became more marked around the time of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, with DiY playing a key role in the largest illegal rave ever put on at Castlemorton Common Festival prior to the Bill and a constant stream of illegal, outdoor parties (often at travellers' sites, quarries and disused airfields) all over the country.

Castlemorton

Castlemorton CommonChandler's Cross Castlemorton Common
As a result, hundreds of new age travellers en-route to the area for the expected festival were shunted into neighbouring counties by Avon and Somerset’s Operation Nomad police manoeuvres, with West Mercia Police deciding to confine them to common land at Castlemorton.
The Common was the location of the controversial Castlemorton Common Festival, a week-long free festival and rave held in 1992, that led to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.

Back to the Planet

Castlemorton hosted many of the large sound systems of the time such as Bedlam, Circus Warp, Spiral Tribe and DiY Sound System, and bands such as Back To The Planet, Xenophobia (fronted by Spiral Tribe's MC Skallywag), AOS3 and Poisoned Electrick Head.
They played four consecutive Glastonbury Festivals and played many free festivals, including the Deptford Urban Festival and the Castlemorton Common Festival in 1992.

List of electronic music festivals

electronic music festival1960selectronic dance music festivals
List of electronic music festivals

Poisoned Electrick Head

Castlemorton hosted many of the large sound systems of the time such as Bedlam, Circus Warp, Spiral Tribe and DiY Sound System, and bands such as Back To The Planet, Xenophobia (fronted by Spiral Tribe's MC Skallywag), AOS3 and Poisoned Electrick Head.
The band played numerous tours, concerts, festivals and underground gatherings including the Stonehenge Free Festival, Glastonbury Festival and the legendary Castlemorton Common Festival of 1992.

Techno

techno musicexperimental technobleep techno
The high point of this free party period came in May 1992 when with less than 24 hours notice and little publicity more than 35,000 gathered at the Castlemorton Common Festival for 5 days of partying.

Teknival

Teknival
In 2002 the tenth anniversary of the legendary Castlemorton rave was celebrated at Steart Beach called the Feeling-Of-Life where around 16,000 people turned up over the course of the weekend.

Malvern Hills District

Malvern HillsMalvern Hills District CouncilDistrict of Malvern Hills
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.

Malvern, Worcestershire

MalvernGreat MalvernThe Malverns
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.

Worcestershire

WorcesterCounty of WorcesterCounty of Worcestershire
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The Castlemorton Common Festival was a week-long free festival and rave held in the Malvern Hills near Malvern, Worcestershire, England between 22 and 29 May 1992.

Avon and Somerset Constabulary

Avon and Somerset PoliceAvon and SomersetAvon & Somerset
In May 1992 Avon and Somerset Police tried to end the annual Avon Free Festival, which had been held in the Bristol area around the May Bank Holiday for several years.

Bristol

Bristol, EnglandCity of BristolCity and County of Bristol
In May 1992 Avon and Somerset Police tried to end the annual Avon Free Festival, which had been held in the Bristol area around the May Bank Holiday for several years.

Bank holiday

bank holidaysAugust bank holidaySpring Bank Holiday
In May 1992 Avon and Somerset Police tried to end the annual Avon Free Festival, which had been held in the Bristol area around the May Bank Holiday for several years.

West Mercia Police

West MerciaWest Mercia ConstabularyPolice
As a result, hundreds of new age travellers en-route to the area for the expected festival were shunted into neighbouring counties by Avon and Somerset’s Operation Nomad police manoeuvres, with West Mercia Police deciding to confine them to common land at Castlemorton.

Stonehenge Free Festival

StonehengeStonehenge festival
An estimated 20,000–40,000 people gathered on Castlemorton Common for the party which lasted a full week, the biggest of its kind since the Stonehenge Free Festival in the mid-1980s.

Sound system (DJ)

sound systemsound systemssoundsystem
Castlemorton hosted many of the large sound systems of the time such as Bedlam, Circus Warp, Spiral Tribe and DiY Sound System, and bands such as Back To The Planet, Xenophobia (fronted by Spiral Tribe's MC Skallywag), AOS3 and Poisoned Electrick Head.

Member of Parliament (United Kingdom)

Member of ParliamentMPMembers of Parliament
The then local MP Michael Spicer, speaking in a House of Commons debate remarked: "The invasion that took place at Castlemorton common in my constituency, on Friday 22 May, has prompted me to do so again. On that day, new age travellers, ravers and drugs racketeers arrived at a strength of two motorised army divisions, complete with several massed bands and, above all, a highly sophisticated command and signals system. However, they failed to bring latrines. The numbers, speed and efficiency with which they arrived--amounting at one time to as many as 30,000 people--combined to terrorise the local community to the extent that some residents had to undergo psychiatric treatment in the days that followed. Such an incident must never happen again, in my constituency or elsewhere. We need tighter laws, especially to give banning powers to the police; a Cabinet Committee to bring responsible Departments together; quicker and more co-ordinated police action; and a more effective application of existing policies by national and local authorities."

Michael Spicer

Sir Michael SpicerLord SpicerThe Lord Spicer
The then local MP Michael Spicer, speaking in a House of Commons debate remarked: "The invasion that took place at Castlemorton common in my constituency, on Friday 22 May, has prompted me to do so again. On that day, new age travellers, ravers and drugs racketeers arrived at a strength of two motorised army divisions, complete with several massed bands and, above all, a highly sophisticated command and signals system. However, they failed to bring latrines. The numbers, speed and efficiency with which they arrived--amounting at one time to as many as 30,000 people--combined to terrorise the local community to the extent that some residents had to undergo psychiatric treatment in the days that followed. Such an incident must never happen again, in my constituency or elsewhere. We need tighter laws, especially to give banning powers to the police; a Cabinet Committee to bring responsible Departments together; quicker and more co-ordinated police action; and a more effective application of existing policies by national and local authorities."

House of Commons

CommonsHouseparliamentary
The then local MP Michael Spicer, speaking in a House of Commons debate remarked: "The invasion that took place at Castlemorton common in my constituency, on Friday 22 May, has prompted me to do so again. On that day, new age travellers, ravers and drugs racketeers arrived at a strength of two motorised army divisions, complete with several massed bands and, above all, a highly sophisticated command and signals system. However, they failed to bring latrines. The numbers, speed and efficiency with which they arrived--amounting at one time to as many as 30,000 people--combined to terrorise the local community to the extent that some residents had to undergo psychiatric treatment in the days that followed. Such an incident must never happen again, in my constituency or elsewhere. We need tighter laws, especially to give banning powers to the police; a Cabinet Committee to bring responsible Departments together; quicker and more co-ordinated police action; and a more effective application of existing policies by national and local authorities."