Catcher

Ccatchingcatcherscaughtpersonal catcherbaseball catchermaskatcherbaseball catcher's maskcatch
Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player.wikipedia
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Pitcher

Ppitchedpitching
When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher.
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.

Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player.
Another player, the catcher, squats on the far side of home plate, facing the pitcher.

Baseball positions

positionfieldingplayers
Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player.
1 (pitcher), 2 (catcher), 3 (first baseman), 4 (second baseman), 5 (third baseman), 6 (shortstop), 7 (left fielder), 8 (center fielder), and 9 (right fielder).

Connie Mack

ConnieCornelius McGillicuddyMackmen
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Cornelius McGillicuddy (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), better known as Connie Mack, was an American professional baseball catcher, manager, and team owner.

Mike Scioscia

Scioscia
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Michael Lorri Scioscia (, ; born November 27, 1958) is an American former Major League Baseball catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Al López

Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Alfonso Ramón López (August 20, 1908 – October 30, 2005) was a Spanish-American professional baseball catcher and manager.

Joe Girardi

Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Joseph Elliott Girardi (born October 14, 1964) is an American former professional baseball catcher and manager.

Joe Torre

Joe Torre Safe at Home Foundation
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Torre's lengthy and distinguished career in MLB began as a player in 1960 with the Milwaukee Braves, as a catcher, first baseman and third baseman.

Brad Ausmus

Notable examples of light-hitting, defensive specialists were Ray Schalk, Jim Hegan, Jim Sundberg and Brad Ausmus.
Bradley David Ausmus (born April 14, 1969) is an American baseball former catcher and current manager for the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Ray Schalk

Notable examples of light-hitting, defensive specialists were Ray Schalk, Jim Hegan, Jim Sundberg and Brad Ausmus.
He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox for the majority of his career.

Steve O'Neill

SteveStephen F. O'NeilSteve O'Neill (M)
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher, most notably with the Cleveland Indians.

Baseball glove

gloveglovesmitt
This includes a mask, chest and throat protectors, shin guards, and a heavily padded catcher's mitt.
During the slow transition to gloves, a player who continued to play without one was called a barehanded catcher; this did not refer to the position of catcher, but rather to the practice of catching with bare hands.

Jim Hegan

Notable examples of light-hitting, defensive specialists were Ray Schalk, Jim Hegan, Jim Sundberg and Brad Ausmus.
He played for seventeen seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball from to and from to, most notably for the Cleveland Indians.

Jim Sundberg

Notable examples of light-hitting, defensive specialists were Ray Schalk, Jim Hegan, Jim Sundberg and Brad Ausmus.
James Howard Sundberg (born May 18, 1951) is an American former professional baseball catcher known for being one of the best defensive catchers of his era.

Strikeout

strikeoutsstruck outstriking out
With the introduction of the called strike in, catchers began inching closer to home plate due to the rules requirement that a strikeout could only be completed by a catch.
Thus, it is possible for a batter to strike out, but still become a runner and reach base safely if the catcher is unable to catch the third strike cleanly, and he then does not either tag out the batter or force him out at first base.

Nat Hicks

In the 1870s, pitcher Candy Cummings was able to introduce the curveball because his catcher, Nat Hicks, fielded his position in close proximity to home plate and was able to catch the deceptive pitch.
He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for six seasons, two in the National League.

Knuckleball

knuckleballerknuckle ballknuckler
Other specialized pitches such as the spitball and the knuckleball followed, which further emphasized the defensive importance of the catcher's position.
This makes the pitch difficult for batters to hit, but also difficult for pitchers to control and catchers to catch; umpires are challenged as well, as the ball's irregular motion through the air makes it harder to call balls and strikes.

Manager (baseball)

managermanagedmanagers
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.
Some managers control pitch selection, defensive positioning, decisions to bunt, steal, pitch out, etc., while others designate an assistant coach or a player (often the catcher) to make some or all of these decisions.

Roger Bresnahan

Bresnahan
The final pieces of protective gear were shin guards which were first worn by catcher Roger Bresnahan in.
He also served as an outfielder, before becoming a regular catcher.

Thurman Munson

Munson
Because the catcher is considered a captain on the field (and some, such as Thurman Munson and Jason Varitek were in fact team captains), he is often in charge of planning defensive plays.
Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American professional baseball catcher who played 11 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1969–1979).

Jason Varitek

Because the catcher is considered a captain on the field (and some, such as Thurman Munson and Jason Varitek were in fact team captains), he is often in charge of planning defensive plays.
Jason Andrew Varitek (born April 11, 1972), nicknamed Tek, is a retired American baseball catcher.

Softball

softball playerDesignated playerslow-pitch softball
Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player.
The catcher is normally behind home plate in a squatted position (some plays may require the catcher to stand at an angle for intentional walks).

Jack Clements

Jack Clements Recording StudiosClementsJohn Clements
Left-handed catchers have only caught eleven big-league games since 1902, and Jack Clements, who played for 17 years at the end of the nineteenth century, is the only man in the history of baseball to play more than three hundred games as a left-handed catcher.
He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for 17 seasons.

Pitch (baseball)

pitchpitchespitching
The catcher is the only defensive player who is allowed to be in foul territory when a pitch is thrown.
The responsibility for selecting the type of pitch was traditionally made by the catcher, who would relay hand signals to the pitcher with the fingers, usually one finger for fastball or the pitcher's best pitch, with the pitcher having the option to ask for another selection by shaking his head.

Yadier Molina

Yadier
Yadier Molina of the St. Louis Cardinals and former MLB catcher Iván Rodríguez are known for using pickoffs with success, particularly at first base.
Yadier Benjamin Molina (born July 13, 1982), nicknamed "Yadi", is a Puerto Rican professional baseball catcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB).