Cathode-ray tube

cathode ray tubeCRTcathode ray tubesCRT monitorCRTsBraun tubeCRT displayCRT screenpicture tubecathode tube
The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that contains one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen and is used to display images.wikipedia
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Vacuum tube

vacuum tubestubethermionic valve
The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that contains one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen and is used to display images.
However, the cathode-ray tube (CRT) remained the basis for television monitors and oscilloscopes until the early 21st century.

Electron gun

electron emitters/gunshollow cathode
The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube that contains one or more electron guns and a phosphorescent screen and is used to display images.
The largest use is in cathode ray tubes (CRTs), used in nearly all television sets, computer displays and oscilloscopes that are not flat-panel displays.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
The images may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets, or other phenomena.
The replacement of early bulky, high-voltage cathode ray tube (CRT) screen displays with compact, energy-efficient, flat-panel alternative technologies such as LCDs (both fluorescent-backlit and LED), OLED displays, and plasma displays was a hardware revolution that began with computer monitors in the late 1990s.

Computer monitor

monitorcomputer displaymonitors
The images may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets, or other phenomena.
Older monitors used a cathode ray tube (CRT).

Video

analog videovideo albumvideo recording
In color devices, an image is produced by controlling the intensity of each of the three electron beams, one for each additive primary color (red, green, and blue) with a video signal as a reference.
Video was first developed for mechanical television systems, which were quickly replaced by cathode ray tube (CRT) systems which were later replaced by flat panel displays of several types.

Williams tube

Williams–Kilburn tubeWilliams tubesWilliams-Kilburn tube
CRTs have also been used as memory devices, in which case the visible light emitted from the fluorescent material (if any) is not intended to have significant meaning to a visual observer (though the visible pattern on the tube face may cryptically represent the stored data).
The Williams tube works by displaying a grid of dots on a cathode ray tube (CRT).

Deflection yoke

scanning coilsmagnetic deflection
In all modern CRT monitors and televisions, the beams are bent by magnetic deflection, a varying magnetic field generated by coils and driven by electronic circuits around the neck of the tube, although electrostatic deflection is commonly used in oscilloscopes, a type of electronic test instrument.
A deflection yoke is a kind of magnetic lens, used in cathode ray tubes to scan the electron beam both vertically and horizontally over the whole screen.

Liquid-crystal display

LCDliquid crystal displayLCD screen
Since the late 2000s, CRTs have been largely superseded by newer "flat panel" display technologies such as LCD, plasma display, and OLED displays, which in the case of LCD and OLED displays have lower manufacturing costs and power consumption, as well as significantly less weight and bulk.
LCD screens have replaced heavy, bulky cathode ray tube (CRT) displays in nearly all applications.

Raster scan

rasterraster scanningscan
In television sets and computer monitors, the entire front area of the tube is scanned repetitively and systematically in a fixed pattern called a raster.
There is a misconception that once a scan line is complete, a CRT display in effect suddenly jumps internally, by analogy with a typewriter or printer's paper advance or line feed, before creating the next scan line.

Plasma display

plasmaplasma TVplasma screen
Since the late 2000s, CRTs have been largely superseded by newer "flat panel" display technologies such as LCD, plasma display, and OLED displays, which in the case of LCD and OLED displays have lower manufacturing costs and power consumption, as well as significantly less weight and bulk.
Competing display technologies include cathode ray tube (CRT), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), AMLCD, Digital Light Processing DLP, SED-tv, LED display, field emission display (FED), and quantum dot display (QLED).

Phosphor

phosphorsP39 phosphorP7 phosphor
It was a cold-cathode diode, a modification of the Crookes tube with a phosphor-coated screen.
Phosphorescent materials are known for their use in radar screens and glow-in-the-dark materials, whereas fluorescent materials are common in cathode ray tube (CRT) and plasma video display screens, fluorescent lights, sensors, and white LEDs.

Electron

electronse − electron mass
In 1897, J. J. Thomson succeeded in measuring the mass of cathode rays, showing that they consisted of negatively charged particles smaller than atoms, the first "subatomic particles", which were later named electrons.
Electrons are involved in many applications such as electronics, welding, cathode ray tubes, electron microscopes, radiation therapy, lasers, gaseous ionization detectors and particle accelerators.

Lead glass

crystalcrystal glassleaded glass
As a matter of safety, the face is typically made of thick lead glass so as to be highly shatter-resistant and to block most X-ray emissions, particularly if the CRT is used in a consumer product.
The presence of lead is used in glasses absorbing gamma radiation and X-rays, used in radiation shielding as a form of lead shielding (e.g. in cathode ray tubes, where lowering the exposure of the viewer to soft X-rays is of concern).

Vladimir K. Zworykin

Vladimir ZworykinZworykinVladimir Kosma Zworykin
It was named in 1929 by inventor Vladimir K. Zworykin, who was influenced by Takayanagi's earlier work.
Zworykin invented a television transmitting and receiving system employing cathode ray tubes.

Cathode

cathodiccopper cathode Indirectly Heated Cathode
Hittorf observed that some unknown rays were emitted from the cathode (negative electrode) which could cast shadows on the glowing wall of the tube, indicating the rays were traveling in straight lines.
In vacuum tubes (including cathode ray tubes) it is the negative terminal where electrons enter the device from the external circuit and proceed into the tube's near-vacuum, constituting a positive current flowing out of the device.

Hot cathode

thermionic cathodecathode poisoningcathode
The first cathode-ray tube to use a hot cathode was developed by John B. Johnson (who gave his name to the term Johnson noise) and Harry Weiner Weinhart of Western Electric, and became a commercial product in 1922.
Today, hot cathodes are used as the source of electrons in fluorescent lamps, vacuum tubes, and the electron guns used in cathode ray tubes and laboratory equipment such as electron microscopes.

Cold cathode

cold-cathodecold cathode fluorescent lampscold cathode fluorescent
It was a cold-cathode diode, a modification of the Crookes tube with a phosphor-coated screen.
Early cold-cathode devices included the Geissler tube and Plucker tube, and early cathode ray tubes.

Flat-panel display

flat panel displayflat panelflat panel displays
Since the late 2000s, CRTs have been largely superseded by newer "flat panel" display technologies such as LCD, plasma display, and OLED displays, which in the case of LCD and OLED displays have lower manufacturing costs and power consumption, as well as significantly less weight and bulk.
They are far lighter and thinner than traditional cathode ray tube (CRT) television sets and video displays and are usually less than 10 cm thick.

Karl Ferdinand Braun

Ferdinand BraunKarl BraunBraun
The earliest version of the CRT was known as the "Braun tube", invented by the German physicist Ferdinand Braun in 1897.
In 1897 he built the first cathode-ray tube (CRT) and cathode ray tube oscilloscope.

Shadow mask

shadow-maskbeam-shadowing mask
They are packed together in stripes (as in aperture grille designs) or clusters called "triads" (as in shadow mask CRTs).
The shadow mask is one of the two technologies used in the manufacture of cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors which produce clear, focused color images.

William Crookes

Sir William CrookesCrookesCrookes lenses
In 1890, Arthur Schuster demonstrated cathode rays could be deflected by electric fields, and William Crookes showed they could be deflected by magnetic fields.
In his investigations of the conduction of electricity in low pressure gases, he discovered that as the pressure was lowered, the negative electrode (cathode) appeared to emit rays (the so-called "cathode rays", now known to be a stream of free electrons, and used in cathode ray display devices).

Analog television

analoganalogueanalogue television
These are found in analog phosphor storage oscilloscopes.
Analog television did not really begin as an industry until the development of the cathode-ray tube (CRT), which uses a focused electron beam to trace lines across a phosphor coated surface.

Aperture grille

aperture-grille
They are packed together in stripes (as in aperture grille designs) or clusters called "triads" (as in shadow mask CRTs).
An aperture grille is one of two major technologies used to manufacture color cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer displays; the other is the shadow mask.

Electrostatic deflection

deflectionelectrostaticelectrostatic deflector
In all modern CRT monitors and televisions, the beams are bent by magnetic deflection, a varying magnetic field generated by coils and driven by electronic circuits around the neck of the tube, although electrostatic deflection is commonly used in oscilloscopes, a type of electronic test instrument.
One application is in small cathode ray tubes for oscilloscopes.

Triad (monitors)

triadtriads
They are packed together in stripes (as in aperture grille designs) or clusters called "triads" (as in shadow mask CRTs).
In CRT or computer terminology, a triad is a group of three phosphor dots coloured red, green, and blue on the inside of the CRT display of a computer monitor or television set.