Catullus

Gaius Valerius CatullusCatallusCatullanCatulleCatullCatulloG. Valerius CatullusGaius CatullusValerius Catullus
Not to be confused with Romans named "Catulus", see Catulus.wikipedia
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Catullus 64

6464thCatullus' longest poem
His body of work is still frequently read from secondary school to graduate programs across the world, with his 64th poem often considered his greatest.
Catullus 64 is an epyllion or "little epic" poem written by Latin poet Catullus.

Ovid

Publius Ovidius NasoOvidianOvidius
Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by other poets, significantly influencing Ovid and Virgil, among others.
They also play with generic conventions; most of the letters seem to refer to works in which these characters were significant, such as the Aeneid in the case of Dido and Catullus 64 for Ariadne, and transfer characters from the genres of epic and tragedy to the elegiac genre of the Heroides.

Helvius Cinna

CinnaCinna the PoetGaius Helvius Cinna
His friends there included the poets Licinius Calvus, and Helvius Cinna, Quintus Hortensius (son of the orator and rival of Cicero) and the biographer Cornelius Nepos, to whom Catullus dedicated a libellus of poems, the relation of which to the extant collection remains a matter of debate.
Gaius Helvius Cinna was an influential neoteric poet of the late Roman Republic, a little older than the generation of Catullus and Calvus.

Latin poetry

LatinLatin versepoet
Gaius Valerius Catullus (, ; c. 84 – c. 54 BCE) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes.
The late republic saw the emergence of Neoteric Poets, notably Catullusrich young men from the Italian provinces, conscious of metropolitan sophistication, and looking to the scholarly Alexandrian poet Callimachus for inspiration.

Virgil

VergilPublius Vergilius MaroVirgilian
Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by other poets, significantly influencing Ovid and Virgil, among others.
From Virgil's admiring references to the neoteric writers Pollio and Cinna, it has been inferred that he was, for a time, associated with Catullus' neoteric circle.

Lesbia

Wikisource
It was probably in Rome that Catullus fell deeply in love with the "Lesbia" of his poems, who is usually identified with Clodia Metelli, a sophisticated woman from the aristocratic house of patrician family Claudii Pulchri, sister of the infamous Publius Clodius Pulcher, and wife to proconsul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer.
Lesbia was the literary pseudonym used by the Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

Sirmio

In a poem, Catullus describes his happy homecoming to the family villa at Sirmio, on Lake Garda, near Verona; he also owned a villa near the resort of Tibur (Tivoli).
It is celebrated in connection with the Roman poet Catullus, as the large ruins of a Roman villa known as the Grotte di Catullo on the promontory have been supposed to be his country house.

Lake Garda

GardaLago di GardaGarda Lake
In a poem, Catullus describes his happy homecoming to the family villa at Sirmio, on Lake Garda, near Verona; he also owned a villa near the resort of Tibur (Tivoli).
In ancient times, poets like Catullus wrote about "Lacus Benacus" with its mild climate vivified by the winds.

Clodia Pulchra (wife of Metellus)

ClodiaClodia MetelliClaudia Pulchra (wife of Metellus)
It was probably in Rome that Catullus fell deeply in love with the "Lesbia" of his poems, who is usually identified with Clodia Metelli, a sophisticated woman from the aristocratic house of patrician family Claudii Pulchri, sister of the infamous Publius Clodius Pulcher, and wife to proconsul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer.
Her life, immortalized in the writings of Marcus Tullius Cicero and also, it is generally believed, in the poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus, was characterized by perpetual scandal.

Marcus Furius Bibaculus

Bibaculus
He appears to have been acquainted with the poet Marcus Furius Bibaculus.
He wrote satirical poems after the manner of Catullus, whose bitterness he rivaled, according to Quintilian (Instit. x.i.196), in his iambics.

Tivoli, Lazio

TivoliTiburTivoli, Italy
In a poem, Catullus describes his happy homecoming to the family villa at Sirmio, on Lake Garda, near Verona; he also owned a villa near the resort of Tibur (Tivoli).
Maecenas and Augustus also had villas at Tibur, and the poet Horace had a modest villa: he and Catullus and Statius all mention Tibur in their poems.

Cornelius Nepos

NeposExcellentium Imperatorum VitaeNepos, Cornelius
His friends there included the poets Licinius Calvus, and Helvius Cinna, Quintus Hortensius (son of the orator and rival of Cicero) and the biographer Cornelius Nepos, to whom Catullus dedicated a libellus of poems, the relation of which to the extant collection remains a matter of debate.
He was a friend of Catullus, who dedicates his poems to him (I.3), Cicero and Titus Pomponius Atticus.

Catullus 16

Carmen'' 1616Carmen 16
Pēdīcābō ego vōs et irrumābō ("I will sodomize and face-fuck you") is the first line, sometimes used as a title, of Carmen 16 in the collected poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

Gaius Memmius (poet)

Gaius MemmiusMemmiusGaius Memmius L. f. Geminus
He spent the provincial command year summer 57 to summer 56 BCE in Bithynia on the staff of the commander Gaius Memmius.
He was Tribune of the Plebs (66 BC), patron of Lucretius and an acquaintance of Catullus and Helvius Cinna.

Licinius Macer Calvus

Licinius CalvusCalvusGaius Licinius Macer Calvus
His friends there included the poets Licinius Calvus, and Helvius Cinna, Quintus Hortensius (son of the orator and rival of Cicero) and the biographer Cornelius Nepos, to whom Catullus dedicated a libellus of poems, the relation of which to the extant collection remains a matter of debate.
Son of Licinius Macer and thus a member of the gens Licinia, he was a friend of the poet Catullus, whose style and subject matter he shared.

Verona

Verona, ItalyVeroneseSan Michele Extra
Gaius Valerius Catullus was born to a leading equestrian family of Verona, in Cisalpine Gaul.

Publius Clodius Pulcher

ClodiusClodius PulcherPublius Claudius Pulcher
It was probably in Rome that Catullus fell deeply in love with the "Lesbia" of his poems, who is usually identified with Clodia Metelli, a sophisticated woman from the aristocratic house of patrician family Claudii Pulchri, sister of the infamous Publius Clodius Pulcher, and wife to proconsul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer.

Catullus 101

101Ave Atque ValeCarmen'' 101
Catullus 101 is an elegiac poem written by the Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus.

Roman Republic

RomanRepublicRomans
Gaius Valerius Catullus (, ; c. 84 – c. 54 BCE) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes.
Other prominent writers of this period include the grammarian and historian of religion Varro, the politician, general and military commentator Julius Caesar, the historian Sallust and the love poet Catullus.

Epithalamium

epithalamiaEpithalamionepithalamic
Both of the latter are epithalamia, a form of laudatory or erotic wedding-poetry that Sappho was famous for.
This form continued in popularity through the history of the classical world; the Roman poet Catullus wrote a famous epithalamium, which was translated from or at least inspired by a now-lost work of Sappho.

Epigram

epigramsepigrammatistepigrammatic
Catullus's poems have been preserved in an anthology of 116 carmina (the actual number of poems may slightly vary in various editions), which can be divided into three parts according to their form: sixty short poems in varying meters, called polymetra, eight longer poems, and forty-eight epigrams.
Authors whose epigrams survive include Catullus, who wrote both invectives and love epigrams – his poem 85 is one of the latter.

Quintus Hortensius

Quintus Hortensius HortalusHortensiusQ. Hortensius
His friends there included the poets Licinius Calvus, and Helvius Cinna, Quintus Hortensius (son of the orator and rival of Cicero) and the biographer Cornelius Nepos, to whom Catullus dedicated a libellus of poems, the relation of which to the extant collection remains a matter of debate.
His son Quintus Hortensius, a friend of the poet Catullus, was granted the governorship of Macedonia in 44 by Julius Caesar, before switching allegiance to Brutus and perishing after the debacle of the battle of Philippi in 42 BC.

Julius Caesar

CaesarGaius Julius CaesarJulius Cæsar
The social prominence of the Catullus family allowed the father of Gaius Valerius to entertain Julius Caesar when he was the Promagistrate (proconsul) of both Gallic provinces.
Catullus wrote two poems suggesting that Caesar and his engineer Mamurra were lovers, but later apologised.

Poetry of Catullus

6566Carmina
His surviving works are still read widely and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art.
The poetry of Gaius Valerius Catullus was written towards the end of the Roman Republic.

Catullus 51

poem 5151Catullus' adaptation of the poem
Catullus 51 partly translates, partly imitates and transforms Sappho 31.
Catullus 51 is a poem by Roman love poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.