A report on Catullus and Lesbia

Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.
Lesbia and Her Sparrow (Catullus 2), by Sir Edward John Poynter
Catullus at Lesbia's by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Lesbia by John Reinhard Weguelin, 1878
Bithynia within the Roman Empire
Lesbia with the Sparrow by John William Godward, 1916
Catullus et in eum commentarius (1554)
Catullus at Lesbia's by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1865
Lesbia, 1878 painting by John Reinhard Weguelin inspired by the poems of Catullus
Favourite Poet by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1888
A Little Gem by Stefan Bakałowicz
Lesbia and Sparrow by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1886
Lesbia by James Sant, 1884

Lesbia was the literary pseudonym used by the Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

- Lesbia

It was probably in Rome that Catullus fell deeply in love with the "Lesbia" of his poems, who is usually identified with Clodia Metelli, a sophisticated woman from the aristocratic house of patrician family Claudii Pulchri, sister of the infamous Publius Clodius Pulcher, and wife to proconsul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer.

- Catullus
Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Catullus 5

0 links

Catullus 5 is a passionate ode to Lesbia and one of the most famous poems by Catullus.

Clodia from the Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum

Clodia (wife of Metellus)

0 links

One of three known daughters of the ancient Roman patrician Appius Claudius Pulcher.

One of three known daughters of the ancient Roman patrician Appius Claudius Pulcher.

Clodia from the Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum
Lesbia and her Sparrow by Sir Edward John Poynter

Her life, which was characterized by perpetual scandal, is immortalized in the writings of Marcus Tullius Cicero and, it is generally believed, in the poems of Gaius Valerius Catullus.

The poet Catullus wrote several love poems about a frequently unfaithful woman he called Lesbia, identified in the mid-second century AD by the writer Apuleius (Apologia 10) as a "Clodia".

Catullus 85

0 links

Catullus 85 is a poem by the Roman poet Catullus for his lover Lesbia.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw

Sappho

0 links

Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw
Head of a woman from the Glyptothek in Munich, identified as "probably" a copy of Silanion's fourth-century BC imaginative portrait of Sappho
Sappho (1877) by Charles Mengin (1853–1933). One tradition claims that Sappho committed suicide by jumping off the Leucadian cliff.
P. Sapph. Obbink: the fragment of papyrus on which the Sappho's Brothers Poem was discovered
Grenfell and Hunt, c.1896
Sappho inspired ancient poets and artists, including the vase painter from the Group of Polygnotos who depicted her on this red-figure hydria.
In the medieval period, Sappho had a reputation as an educated woman and talented poet. In this woodcut, illustrating an early incunable of Boccaccio's De mulieribus claris, she is portrayed surrounded by books and musical instruments.
Detail of Sappho from Raphael's Parnassus (1510–11), shown alongside other poets. In her left hand, she holds a scroll with her name written on it.
alt=Red-figure vase painting of a woman holding a lyre. On the left, a bearded man with a lyre is partially visible.|One of the earliest surviving images of Sappho, from c. 470 BC. She is shown holding a lyre and plectrum, and turning to listen to Alcaeus.{{sfn|McClure|2002|page=38}}
Sappho's portrait from the Istanbul Archaeology Museums. Roman copy of an original from the Hellenistic period
alt=White marble bust of a woman|A Roman sculpture of Sappho, based on a Classical Greek model. The inscription reads ΣΑΠΦΩ ΕΡΕΣΙΑ, or "Sappho of Eresos".

In the first century BC, Catullus established the themes and metres of Sappho's poetry as a part of Latin literature, adopting the Sapphic stanza, believed in antiquity to have been invented by Sappho, giving his lover in his poetry the name "Lesbia" in reference to Sappho, and adapting and translating Sappho's 31st fragment in his poem 51.