A report on Catullus and Sapphic stanza

Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.
Alcaeus and Sappho, the two great poets of Lesbos. Attic red-figure calathus, c. 470 BCE
Catullus at Lesbia's by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema
A papyrus manuscript preserving Sappho's "Fragment 5", a poem written in Sapphic stanzas
Bithynia within the Roman Empire
Algernon Charles Swinburne, around the time he published "Sapphics"
Catullus et in eum commentarius (1554)
Lesbia, 1878 painting by John Reinhard Weguelin inspired by the poems of Catullus

A few centuries later, the Roman poet Catullus admired Sappho's work and used the Sapphic stanza in two poems: Catullus 11 (commemorating the end of his affair with Clodia) and Catullus 51 (marking its beginning).

- Sapphic stanza

Catullus twice used a meter that Sappho was known for, called the Sapphic stanza, in poems 11 and 51, perhaps prompting his successor Horace's interest in the form.

- Catullus
Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.

4 related topics with Alpha

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Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Catullus at Lesbia's 1865

Sappho 31

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Archaic Greek lyric poem by the ancient Greek poet Sappho of the island of Lesbos.

Archaic Greek lyric poem by the ancient Greek poet Sappho of the island of Lesbos.

Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Catullus at Lesbia's 1865

Fragment 31 is composed in Sapphic stanzas, a metrical form named after Sappho and consisting of stanzas of three long followed by one short line.

First translations of the poem would derive from Catullus' re-visitation of the poem, Catullus 51, painting Sappho with a green taint of jealousy.

Catullus 51

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Catullus 51 is a poem by Roman love poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

Unlike the majority of Catullus' poems, the meter of this poem is the sapphic meter.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw

Sappho

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Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw
Head of a woman from the Glyptothek in Munich, identified as "probably" a copy of Silanion's fourth-century BC imaginative portrait of Sappho
Sappho (1877) by Charles Mengin (1853–1933). One tradition claims that Sappho committed suicide by jumping off the Leucadian cliff.
P. Sapph. Obbink: the fragment of papyrus on which the Sappho's Brothers Poem was discovered
Grenfell and Hunt, c.1896
Sappho inspired ancient poets and artists, including the vase painter from the Group of Polygnotos who depicted her on this red-figure hydria.
In the medieval period, Sappho had a reputation as an educated woman and talented poet. In this woodcut, illustrating an early incunable of Boccaccio's De mulieribus claris, she is portrayed surrounded by books and musical instruments.
Detail of Sappho from Raphael's Parnassus (1510–11), shown alongside other poets. In her left hand, she holds a scroll with her name written on it.
alt=Red-figure vase painting of a woman holding a lyre. On the left, a bearded man with a lyre is partially visible.|One of the earliest surviving images of Sappho, from c. 470 BC. She is shown holding a lyre and plectrum, and turning to listen to Alcaeus.{{sfn|McClure|2002|page=38}}
Sappho's portrait from the Istanbul Archaeology Museums. Roman copy of an original from the Hellenistic period
alt=White marble bust of a woman|A Roman sculpture of Sappho, based on a Classical Greek model. The inscription reads ΣΑΠΦΩ ΕΡΕΣΙΑ, or "Sappho of Eresos".

Ancient editions of Sappho, possibly starting with the Alexandrian edition, seem to have ordered the poems in at least the first book of Sappho's poetry – which contained works composed in Sapphic stanzas – alphabetically.

In the first century BC, Catullus established the themes and metres of Sappho's poetry as a part of Latin literature, adopting the Sapphic stanza, believed in antiquity to have been invented by Sappho, giving his lover in his poetry the name "Lesbia" in reference to Sappho, and adapting and translating Sappho's 31st fragment in his poem 51.

Catullus 11

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Catullus 11 is a poem by Catullus.

Poem 11 is one of the two poems that Catullus writes in the Sapphic meter.