A report on Catullus

Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.
Catullus at Lesbia's by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Bithynia within the Roman Empire
Catullus et in eum commentarius (1554)
Lesbia, 1878 painting by John Reinhard Weguelin inspired by the poems of Catullus

Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, focusing on personal life rather than classical heroes.

- Catullus
Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione.

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Bust of Virgil at the entrance to his crypt in Naples

Virgil

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Ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period.

Ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period.

Bust of Virgil at the entrance to his crypt in Naples
Bust of Virgil at the entrance to his crypt in Naples
Page from the beginning of the Eclogues in the 5th-century Vergilius Romanus
Horace, Virgil and Varius at the house of Maecenas, by Charles Jalabert.
Late 17th-century illustration of a passage from the Georgics, by Jerzy Siemiginowski-Eleuter.
A 1st-century terracotta expressing the pietas of Aeneas, who carries his aged father and leads his young son
Virgil Reading the Aeneid to Augustus, Octavia, and Livia by Jean-Baptiste Wicar, Art Institute of Chicago
A 3rd-century Roman mosaic of Virgil seated between Clio and Melpomene (from Hadrumetum [Sousse], Tunisia)
A 5th-century portrait of Virgil from the Vergilius Romanus
Virgil in His Basket, Lucas van Leyden, 1525
The verse inscription at Virgil's tomb was supposedly composed by the poet himself: Mantua me genuit, Calabri rapuere, tenet nunc Parthenope. Cecini pascua, rura, duces. ("Mantua gave me life, the Calabrians took it away, Naples holds me now; I sang of pastures, farms, and commanders" [transl. Bernard Knox])
Tomb of Virgil in Naples, Italy

From Virgil's admiring references to the neoteric writers Pollio and Cinna, it has been inferred that he was, for a time, associated with Catullus' neoteric circle.

Lesbia and Her Sparrow (Catullus 2), by Sir Edward John Poynter

Lesbia

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Lesbia and Her Sparrow (Catullus 2), by Sir Edward John Poynter
Lesbia by John Reinhard Weguelin, 1878
Lesbia with the Sparrow by John William Godward, 1916
Catullus at Lesbia's by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1865
Favourite Poet by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1888
A Little Gem by Stefan Bakałowicz
Lesbia and Sparrow by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1886
Lesbia by James Sant, 1884

Lesbia was the literary pseudonym used by the Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

Helvius Cinna

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Gaius Helvius Cinna (died 20 March 44 BC) was an influential neoteric poet of the late Roman Republic, a little older than the generation of Catullus and Calvus.

Ovid

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Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

Statue of Ovid by Ettore Ferrari in the Piazza XX Settembre, Sulmona, Italy.
Ovid Banished from Rome (1838) by J.M.W. Turner.
Medea in a fresco from Herculaneum.
Engraved frontispiece of George Sandys’s 1632 London edition of Ovid's Metamorphoses Englished.
A 1484 figure from Ovide Moralisé, edition by Colard Mansion.
Delacroix, Ovid among the Scythians, 1859. National Gallery (London).
Ovid as imagined in the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493.
Metamorphoses, 1618
Ovid by Anton von Werner.
Ovid by Luca Signorelli.
Scythians at the Tomb of Ovid (c.1640), by Johann Heinrich Schönfeld.
Bust of Ovid by anonymous sculptor, Uffizi gallery Florence

They also play with generic conventions; most of the letters seem to refer to works in which these characters were significant, such as the Aeneid in the case of Dido and Catullus 64 for Ariadne, and transfer characters from the genres of epic and tragedy to the elegiac genre of the Heroides.

Catullus 51

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Catullus 51 is a poem by Roman love poet Gaius Valerius Catullus (c.

Acme and Septimius, painting by Frederic Leighton

Poetry of Catullus

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Acme and Septimius, painting by Frederic Leighton
Catullus et in eum commentarius (1554)

The poetry of Gaius Valerius Catullus was written towards the end of the Roman Republic.

Alcaeus and Sappho, the two great poets of Lesbos. Attic red-figure calathus, c. 470 BCE

Sapphic stanza

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Aeolic verse form of four lines.

Aeolic verse form of four lines.

Alcaeus and Sappho, the two great poets of Lesbos. Attic red-figure calathus, c. 470 BCE
A papyrus manuscript preserving Sappho's "Fragment 5", a poem written in Sapphic stanzas
Algernon Charles Swinburne, around the time he published "Sapphics"

A few centuries later, the Roman poet Catullus admired Sappho's work and used the Sapphic stanza in two poems: Catullus 11 (commemorating the end of his affair with Clodia) and Catullus 51 (marking its beginning).

The composer, aquatint etching

Catulli Carmina

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Cantata by Carl Orff dating from 1940–1943.

Cantata by Carl Orff dating from 1940–1943.

The composer, aquatint etching

The work mostly sets poems of the Latin poet Catullus to music, with some text by the composer.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw

Sappho

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Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Archaic Greek poet from Eresos or Mytilene on the island of Lesbos.

Kalpis painting of Sappho by the Sappho Painter (c. undefined 510 BC), currently held in the National Museum, Warsaw
Head of a woman from the Glyptothek in Munich, identified as "probably" a copy of Silanion's fourth-century BC imaginative portrait of Sappho
Sappho (1877) by Charles Mengin (1853–1933). One tradition claims that Sappho committed suicide by jumping off the Leucadian cliff.
P. Sapph. Obbink: the fragment of papyrus on which the Sappho's Brothers Poem was discovered
Grenfell and Hunt, c.1896
Sappho inspired ancient poets and artists, including the vase painter from the Group of Polygnotos who depicted her on this red-figure hydria.
In the medieval period, Sappho had a reputation as an educated woman and talented poet. In this woodcut, illustrating an early incunable of Boccaccio's De mulieribus claris, she is portrayed surrounded by books and musical instruments.
Detail of Sappho from Raphael's Parnassus (1510–11), shown alongside other poets. In her left hand, she holds a scroll with her name written on it.
alt=Red-figure vase painting of a woman holding a lyre. On the left, a bearded man with a lyre is partially visible.|One of the earliest surviving images of Sappho, from c. 470 BC. She is shown holding a lyre and plectrum, and turning to listen to Alcaeus.{{sfn|McClure|2002|page=38}}
Sappho's portrait from the Istanbul Archaeology Museums. Roman copy of an original from the Hellenistic period
alt=White marble bust of a woman|A Roman sculpture of Sappho, based on a Classical Greek model. The inscription reads ΣΑΠΦΩ ΕΡΕΣΙΑ, or "Sappho of Eresos".

In the first century BC, Catullus established the themes and metres of Sappho's poetry as a part of Latin literature, adopting the Sapphic stanza, believed in antiquity to have been invented by Sappho, giving his lover in his poetry the name "Lesbia" in reference to Sappho, and adapting and translating Sappho's 31st fragment in his poem 51.

Neoteric

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The Neoterikoi (Greek νεωτερικοί "new poets") or Neoterics were a series of avant-garde Latin poets who wrote in the 1st century BC. Neoteric poets deliberately turned away from classical Homeric epic poetry.

The Neoterikoi (Greek νεωτερικοί "new poets") or Neoterics were a series of avant-garde Latin poets who wrote in the 1st century BC. Neoteric poets deliberately turned away from classical Homeric epic poetry.

The most significant surviving Neoteric works are those of Catullus.