Caucus

caucusesparty caucusWomen's Caucusparliamentary caucusLabor caucusBinding Precinct CaucusesBloc Québécois Caucus Chaircaucus groupMinority Caucus ChairmanParliamentary Caucus Head
A caucus is a meeting of supporters or members of a specific political party or movement.wikipedia
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Boston Caucus

The American Heritage Dictionary suggests that it possibly derived from medieval Latin caucus, meaning "drinking vessel", such as might have been used for the flip drunk at Caucus Club of colonial Boston.
This was perhaps the first use of the word caucus to mean a meeting of members of a movement or political party to agree on a common position.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsElectoral College votes
The term caucus is frequently used to discuss the procedures used by some states to select presidential nominees such as the Iowa caucuses, the first of the modern presidential election cycle, and the Texas caucuses.
The primary elections are run by state and local governments, while the caucuses are organized directly by the political parties.

Congressional caucus

caucuscaucusescaucused
Of the many Congressional caucuses, one of the best-known is the Congressional Black Caucus, a group of African-American members of Congress.
The largest caucuses are the party caucuses and conferences in the United States Congress, which are the partisan caucuses comprising all members of one house from one party (either the Democrats or the Republicans) in addition to any independent members who may caucus with either party.

Partisan (politics)

partisanpartisanshipmulti-partisan
There can be smaller caucuses in a legislative body, including those that are multi-partisan or even bicameral.
In 2016 Bernie Sanders, an independent Senator from Vermont who caucused with the Democratic Party for years, entered the Democratic Party primaries and made a strong second-place finish, and left the party after the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

United States House of Representatives Democratic Caucus

DemocraticHouse Democratic CaucusDemocratic Caucus
Other congressional caucuses such as the Out of Iraq Caucus, are openly organized tendencies or political factions (within the House Democratic Caucus, in this case), and strive to achieve political goals, similar to a European "platform", but generally organized around a single issue.
In its roles as a party conference, the caucus writes and enforces rules of conduct and discipline for its members, approves committee assignments, and serves as the primary forum for development of party policy and legislative priorities.

Australian Labor Party Caucus

Labor CaucusCaucusALP caucus
Thus, the Australian Federal Parliamentary Labor Party is commonly called "the Labor Caucus".
The Caucus determines some matters of policy, parliamentary tactics, and disciplinary measures against disobedient MPs.

Caucus chair

Chair of the Government CaucusPresident of the Government Caucuschair
These members elect among themselves a caucus chair who presides over their meetings.
A caucus chairman is a person who chairs the meetings of a caucus.

Presidential nominee

presumptive nomineepresidential nominationnominee for president
The term caucus is frequently used to discuss the procedures used by some states to select presidential nominees such as the Iowa caucuses, the first of the modern presidential election cycle, and the Texas caucuses.
A candidate mathematically clinches a nomination by securing a simple majority (i.e., more than 50 percent) of delegates through the primaries and caucuses prior to the convention.

Parliamentary group

parliamentary partyfractionparliamentary parties
However, when used in these countries, "caucus" is more often a collective term for all members of a party in Parliament, otherwise called a parliamentary group, rather than a word for a regular meeting of these Members of Parliament.
Parliamentary groups correspond to "caucuses" in the United States Congress and the Canadian Parliament.

Australian Labor Party

LaborLabor PartyALP
It was introduced to Australia in 1901 by King O'Malley, an American-born Labour member of the first Federal Parliament. For example, this is traditionally so in the Australian Labor Party and the New Zealand Labour Party.
In total, they won 14 of the 75 seats in the House of Representatives, collectively holding the balance of power, and the Labour members now met as the Federal Parliamentary Labour Party (informally known as the caucus) on 8 May 1901 at Parliament House, Melbourne, the meeting place of the first federal Parliament.

New Zealand Labour Party

Labour PartyLabourLabour Government
For example, this is traditionally so in the Australian Labor Party and the New Zealand Labour Party.
Since the 2008 general election, Labour has comprised the second-largest caucus represented in the House of Representatives.

New Zealand Liberal Party

Liberal PartyLiberalLiberals
The word was used in New Zealand from at least the 1890s, when organized political parties began to emerge: the largest of them, the Liberal Party, used it to refer to its parliamentary members.
Seddon had originally assumed the leadership on an interim basis, with a full caucus vote intended for later, but no vote was ever held.

William Harris (Birmingham Liberal)

William HarrisThe Caucus
The system had originated at a local level in Birmingham in preparation for the 1868 general election, when, under the 1867 Reform Act, the city had been allocated three parliamentary seats, but each elector had only two votes: in order to spread votes evenly, the secretary of the Birmingham Liberal Association, William Harris (later dubbed the "father of the Caucus") devised a four-tier organizational structure (of ward committees, general committee, executive committee, and management committee) through which Liberal voters in different wards could be instructed in the precise combinations in which to cast their votes.
He was dubbed the "father of the Caucus", the highly organised and controversial Liberal party machine that had its origins in Birmingham, but was afterwards introduced at national level to the National Liberal Federation.

National Liberal Federation

NLF
In 1877 the newly formed National Liberal Federation was given a similar structure, on the initiative of Joseph Chamberlain, and again worked out in detail by Harris.
Its structure – which became known as the "Caucus" – was modelled on that of the Birmingham Liberal Association, which had been so effective in building a mass membership and an efficient electioneering body in the city under the political leadership of Joseph Chamberlain, and drawing on the strategic and organisational skills of William Harris (secretary 1868–73) and Francis Schnadhorst (secretary 1873–84).

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
In 1877 the newly formed National Liberal Federation was given a similar structure, on the initiative of Joseph Chamberlain, and again worked out in detail by Harris.
His contribution to the city's improvement earned Chamberlain the allegiance of the so-called "Birmingham caucus" for the rest of his public career.

Platform (European politics)

platformplatforms
Other congressional caucuses such as the Out of Iraq Caucus, are openly organized tendencies or political factions (within the House Democratic Caucus, in this case), and strive to achieve political goals, similar to a European "platform", but generally organized around a single issue.
Such groups in American left-wing political organizations are usually called tendencies or caucuses.

Convention (meeting)

conventionconventionsconference
In conventions, where the membership from different parts of the organization may gather, each separate group within the organization may meet prior to the convention as a caucus.
Caucus

Delegate

delegatesdelegationdelegated
Unless the votes are made binding, however, each delegate is still free to vote in any fashion.
Caucus

Committee

standing committeeexecutive committeeconference committee
Committee
Caucus

Political party

political partiespartyparties
A caucus is a meeting of supporters or members of a specific political party or movement.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Nepal.

Australia

🇦🇺AUSAustralian
The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Nepal.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Nepal.

New Zealand

🇳🇿NZLNZ
The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Nepal.

South Africa

🇿🇦South AfricanRepublic of South Africa
The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and Nepal.