Cavendish banana

CavendishbananasCavendish banana subgroupCavendish bananasCavendish SubgroupCavendish groupCavendish ValeryCavendish varietiesExternal linksMusa cavendishii
Cavendish bananas are the fruits of one of a number of banana cultivars belonging to the Cavendish subgroup of the AAA banana cultivar group.wikipedia
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Dwarf Cavendish banana

Dwarf CavendishCavendishCavendish bananas
They include commercially important cultivars like 'Dwarf Cavendish' (1888) and 'Grand Nain' (the "Chiquita banana"). The most important clones for fruit production include: 'Dwarf Cavendish', 'Grande Naine', 'Lacatan' (bungulan), 'Poyo', 'Valéry', and 'Williams' under one system of cultivar classification.
The Dwarf Cavendish banana is a widely grown and commercially important Cavendish cultivar.

William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire

6th Duke of DevonshireDuke of DevonshireThe Duke of Devonshire
Cavendish bananas were named after William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire.
The Cavendish banana is named after him.

Panama disease

soil fungus outbreak
They replaced the Gros Michel banana (commonly known as Kampala banana in Kenya and Bogoya in Uganda) after it was devastated by Panama disease. The development of resistant varieties has therefore been the only alternative to protect the fruit trees from tropical and subtropical diseases like bacterial wilt and Fusarium wilt, commonly known as Panama disease.
Currently, a new outbreak of Panama disease caused by the strain Tropical Race 4 (TR4) threatens the production of today's most popular cultivars, Cavendish.

Joseph Paxton

PaxtonSir Joseph PaxtonPaxt.
His head gardener and friend, Sir Joseph Paxton, cultivated them in the greenhouses of Chatsworth House.
Sir Joseph Paxton (3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.

List of banana cultivars

AAAAABanana cultivars
Cavendish bananas are the fruits of one of a number of banana cultivars belonging to the Cavendish subgroup of the AAA banana cultivar group. Cavendish bananas are a subgroup of the triploid (AAA) group cultivars of Musa acuminata.

Grand Nain

Grande Naine
They include commercially important cultivars like 'Dwarf Cavendish' (1888) and 'Grand Nain' (the "Chiquita banana"). The most important clones for fruit production include: 'Dwarf Cavendish', 'Grande Naine', 'Lacatan' (bungulan), 'Poyo', 'Valéry', and 'Williams' under one system of cultivar classification.
It is one of the most commonly cultivated bananas and a source of commercial Cavendish bananas.

Masak Hijau banana

Masak Hijaugiant figLacatan
The most important clones for fruit production include: 'Dwarf Cavendish', 'Grande Naine', 'Lacatan' (bungulan), 'Poyo', 'Valéry', and 'Williams' under one system of cultivar classification.
It is a member of the commercially important Cavendish banana subgroup.

Musa acuminata

M. acuminataMusa nanaapple
Cavendish bananas are a subgroup of the triploid (AAA) group cultivars of Musa acuminata.
The most familiar dessert banana cultivars belong to the Cavendish subgroup.

Gros Michel banana

Gros Michel
They replaced the Gros Michel banana (commonly known as Kampala banana in Kenya and Bogoya in Uganda) after it was devastated by Panama disease.
By the 1960s, the exporters of Gros Michel bananas were unable to keep trading such a susceptible cultivar, and started growing resistant cultivars belonging to the Cavendish subgroup (another Musa acuminata AAA).

Banana industry

banana agricultural industrybanana crop productionbanana export and production
In spite of the multitude of banana species across the world, even only taking into account the cultivated ones, industrial production is dominated by the Cavendish banana.

Fusarium wilt

FFusariumvascular wilt
The development of resistant varieties has therefore been the only alternative to protect the fruit trees from tropical and subtropical diseases like bacterial wilt and Fusarium wilt, commonly known as Panama disease.
Fusarium wilt (Panama disease) is the most serious disease of banana, threatening 80% of the world's banana production, most of which is planted with the susceptible Cavendish varieties.

Banana

bananasbanana treebanana flower
Cavendish bananas are the fruits of one of a number of banana cultivars belonging to the Cavendish subgroup of the AAA banana cultivar group.

Cultivar

cultivarscultivated varietyvariety
Cavendish bananas are the fruits of one of a number of banana cultivars belonging to the Cavendish subgroup of the AAA banana cultivar group.

Chiquita Brands International

ChiquitaChiquita BananaUnited Brands Company
They include commercially important cultivars like 'Dwarf Cavendish' (1888) and 'Grand Nain' (the "Chiquita banana").

Kenya

KenyanRepublic of KenyaKEN
They replaced the Gros Michel banana (commonly known as Kampala banana in Kenya and Bogoya in Uganda) after it was devastated by Panama disease.

Uganda

UgandanRepublic of UgandaUGA
They replaced the Gros Michel banana (commonly known as Kampala banana in Kenya and Bogoya in Uganda) after it was devastated by Panama disease.

Mauritius

MauritianÎle de FranceRepublic of Mauritius
Though they were not the first known banana specimens in Europe, in around 1834 Cavendish received a shipment of bananas (from Mauritius) courtesy of the chaplain of Alton Towers (then the seat of the Earls of Shrewsbury).

Chaplain

Domestic Chaplainchaplaincychaplains
Though they were not the first known banana specimens in Europe, in around 1834 Cavendish received a shipment of bananas (from Mauritius) courtesy of the chaplain of Alton Towers (then the seat of the Earls of Shrewsbury).

History of Alton Towers

Alton TowersAlton HallAlton Mansion
Though they were not the first known banana specimens in Europe, in around 1834 Cavendish received a shipment of bananas (from Mauritius) courtesy of the chaplain of Alton Towers (then the seat of the Earls of Shrewsbury).

Earl of Shrewsbury

Earls of ShrewsburyEarl of Waterford (1446)Earl of Shrewsbury (1442)
Though they were not the first known banana specimens in Europe, in around 1834 Cavendish received a shipment of bananas (from Mauritius) courtesy of the chaplain of Alton Towers (then the seat of the Earls of Shrewsbury).

Chatsworth House

ChatsworthChatsworth EstateDevonshire Collection
His head gardener and friend, Sir Joseph Paxton, cultivated them in the greenhouses of Chatsworth House.

Royal Horticultural Society

RHSThe Royal Horticultural SocietyHorticultural Society of London
For his work Paxton won a medal at the 1835 Royal Horticultural Society show.

Pacific Ocean

PacificSouth PacificWestern Pacific
The Chatsworth bananas were shipped off to various places in the Pacific around the 1850s.

Canary Islands

Canary IslandCanariesCanarian
It is believed that some of them may have ended up in the Canary Islands, though other authors believe that the bananas in the Canary Islands had been there since the fifteenth century and had been introduced through other means, namely by early Portuguese explorers who obtained them from West Africa and were later responsible for spreading them to the Caribbean.

Portuguese people

PortuguesePortuguese diasporaPortuguese parents
It is believed that some of them may have ended up in the Canary Islands, though other authors believe that the bananas in the Canary Islands had been there since the fifteenth century and had been introduced through other means, namely by early Portuguese explorers who obtained them from West Africa and were later responsible for spreading them to the Caribbean.