Cecily Bulstrode

Cecily Bulstrode (1584 – 4 August 1609) was a courtier and subject of poetry.wikipedia
46 Related Articles

Lady of the Bedchamber

Ladies of the Bedchamberdame du palaisstatsfru
Two years later, she served as a Gentlewoman of the Bedchamber to Anne of Denmark.

Dorothy Bulstrode

DorothyDorothy, later Lady Eyre
Bulstrode and her youngest sister Dorothy, later Lady Eyre, moved up with Lucy Russell, becoming Maidens of the Queen’s Bedchamber. Herbert fought over the hair-ribbon of Mary Middlemore, one of Bulstrode's companions at court in December 1609, and in 1611 became involved with Bulstrode's sister Dorothy Bulstrode, driving her husband Sir John Eyre to assault him.
Dorothy Bulstrode, or Boulstred, was a lady in waiting to Anne of Denmark, and a younger sister of Cecily Bulstrode the subject of poems by Ben Jonson and John Donne.

Lucy Russell, Countess of Bedford

Lucy, Countess of BedfordCountess of BedfordLucy Harington
She was the daughter of Edward Bulstrode (1550–1595) and Cecily Croke; she was a cousin of Lucy Russell, Countess of Bedford, in whose household she was a member in 1605.
She was also receptive to women poets, such as her cousin Cecily Bulstrode.

Twickenham Park

No cure could be found, and she wasted away at the countess of Bedford’s house, Twickenham Park, unable to hold down food or liquids.
The courtier and poet Cecily Bulstrode died at Twickenham Park on 4 August 1609.

George Garrard (MP)

George GarrardReverend George GarrardGeorge Garrett
Jonson seems to have written the poem for George Garrard.
He was a friend of the queen's lady in waiting Cecily Bulstrode and when she died in August 1609 he asked Ben Jonson to write an epitaph.

St Mary's Church, Twickenham

St Mary's, TwickenhamSt Mary's ChurchChurch of St Mary the Virgin
Bulstrode's brother in-law, James Whitlocke noted her death, “Cecill Bulstrode, my wife’s sister, gentlewoman to Queen An, ordinary of her bedchamber, died at Twitnam in Middlesex, the erl of Bedford’s house, 4 August 1609”, and she was buried at St Mary's, Twickenham two days later.

John Eyre (died 1639)

Sir John EyreJohn
Herbert fought over the hair-ribbon of Mary Middlemore, one of Bulstrode's companions at court in December 1609, and in 1611 became involved with Bulstrode's sister Dorothy Bulstrode, driving her husband Sir John Eyre to assault him.
He married Dorothy Bulstrode or Boulstred, a lady in waiting to Anne of Denmark, and a younger sister of Cecily Bulstrode the subject of poems by Ben Jonson and John Donne.

Anne of Denmark

Queen AnneAnneQueen Anne of Denmark
Two years later, she served as a Gentlewoman of the Bedchamber to Anne of Denmark.

Hedgerley

Hedgerley DeanHedgerley GreenHedgerley Hill
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

Buckinghamshire

County of BuckinghamBuckinghamshire, EnglandBucks
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

Floruit

fl.flflourished
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

John Croke

Sir John CrokeLady Croke
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

Chilton, Buckinghamshire

Chilton
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

Beaconsfield

Beaconsfield, BuckinghamshireHoltspurBeaconsfield, England
She was born to Edward Bulstrode (1550-1595) of Hedgerley in Buckinghamshire and Cecily or Cecill Croke (fl. 1575-1608), the daughter of Sir John Croke of Chilton, in Beaconsfield.

St Laurence's Church, Upton-cum-Chalvey

St Laurence's ChurchChurch of St Laurence, Upton-cum-ChalveySt Laurence
Cecily was the fourth of six daughters, the names of her nine siblings are recorded on her father's tomb at St Laurence's Church, Upton-cum-Chalvey.

Cold Norton

In June 1608 Bulstrode's mother Cecily married again, to Sir John Brown of Flamberds, at Cold Norton, Essex.

Essex

Essex, EnglandCounty of EssexEssex County
In June 1608 Bulstrode's mother Cecily married again, to Sir John Brown of Flamberds, at Cold Norton, Essex.

Courtier

courtierscourtcourtly
Bulstrode followed in the footsteps of her ancestors as a courtier.

James VI and I

James IJames VIJames I of England
When King James I came to the throne, the countess of Bedford became First Lady of the Bedchamber to the queen.

Ben Jonson

JonsonBen JohnsonBenjamin Jonson
During her time at the court of Anne of Denmark, Bulstrode became the subject of works by poets such as Ben Jonson who threatened her reputation with rumours of promiscuity.

John Donne

DonneJonathan DunneAnn More
Other writers, including John Donne, used the event of her death as an opportunity to gain favor with her friend and patron of the literary arts, the countess of Bedford.

Donald Wayne Foster

Donald FosterDon FosterDonald W. Foster
Although the speaker claims to be a sincere friend who will keep the poem secret to protect her reputation, the poem was not kept secret and was most likely an attempt to ruin Bulstrode's reputation and allege, according to Donald Foster, “that Boulstred solicited Roe for sex, which caused him to reject her as unfit for marriage.” In 1628, Ben Jonson revealed that he actually ghostwrote this poem for Roe.

Thomas Roe

Sir Thomas RoeSir Thomas RowSir Thomas Rowe
Boulstred eventually started a relationship with Sir Thomas Roe, Sir John Roe's cousin.

College of Medicine (UK)

The College of MedicineCollege of MedicineJacky Paice
Her illness was diagnosed by doctors of the College of Medicine as "the mother" also called the "wandering womb", an imprecise diagnosis for ailments thought to attend upon feminine frailty.

Wandering womb

Her illness was diagnosed by doctors of the College of Medicine as "the mother" also called the "wandering womb", an imprecise diagnosis for ailments thought to attend upon feminine frailty.