Celecoxib

Celebrex
Celecoxib, sold under the brand name Celebrex among others, is a COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).wikipedia
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COX-2 inhibitor

COX-2 selective inhibitorCOX-2 inhibitorsCOX inhibitor
Celecoxib, sold under the brand name Celebrex among others, is a COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).
Targeting selectivity for COX-2 reduces the risk of peptic ulceration and is the main feature of celecoxib, rofecoxib, and other members of this drug class.

Pfizer

Pfizer Inc.Pfizer, Inc.Pfizer Inc
In 2011, it was one of Pfizer's best-selling medications, with $2.5 billion in sales.
Its products include the blockbuster drug Lipitor (atorvastatin), used to lower LDL blood cholesterol; Lyrica (pregabalin) for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia; Diflucan (fluconazole), an oral antifungal medication; Zithromax (azithromycin), an antibiotic; Viagra (sildenafil) for erectile dysfunction; and Celebrex (also Celebra, celecoxib), an anti-inflammatory drug.

Osteoarthritis

arthrosisdegenerative joint diseaseKnee osteoarthritis
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
Another class of NSAIDs, COX-2 selective inhibitors (such as celecoxib) are equally effective when compared to nonselective NSAIDs, and have lower rates of adverse gastrointestinal effects, but higher rates of cardiovascular disease such as myocardial infarction.

Dysmenorrhea

dysmenorrhoeamenstrual crampspainful menstruation
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
People who are unable to take the more common NSAIDs may be prescribed a COX-2 inhibitor such as celecoxib.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

NSAIDNSAIDsnon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug
Celecoxib, sold under the brand name Celebrex among others, is a COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

Rheumatoid arthritis

rheumatoidrheumatic arthritisarthritis, rheumatoid
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib, and NSAIDs are equally effective.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

juvenile rheumatoid arthritisStill's diseaseJuvenile chronic arthritis
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
Celecoxib has been found effective in one study.

Major depressive disorder

depressionclinical depressionmajor depression
Tentative evidence supports its use in treating a number of psychiatric disorders, including major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.
There is some preliminary evidence that COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib, have a beneficial effect on major depression.

John Talley

Celecoxib and other COX-2 selective inhibitors, valdecoxib, parecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley.
John J. Talley is an American medicinal chemist who was the lead chemist in the discovery of the COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib and a co-inventor of amprenavir, a protease inhibitor used to treat HIV infection.

Monsanto

Monsanto CompanyMonsanto Chemical CompanyCalgene
Celecoxib and other COX-2 selective inhibitors, valdecoxib, parecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley. According to the National Academy of Sciences, Philip Needleman, who was vice president of Monsanto in 1989 and president of Searle in 1993 oversaw research into COX-2 that led to the development of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex).
In 1993, its Searle division filed a patent application for Celebrex, which in 1998 became the first selective COX‑2 inhibitor to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Mavacoxib

Celecoxib and other COX-2 selective inhibitors, valdecoxib, parecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley.
Mavacoxib, along with other COX-2 selective inhibitors, celecoxib, valdecoxib, and parecoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley.

Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2

COX-2cyclooxygenase 2cyclooxygenase-2
A highly selective reversible inhibitor of the COX-2 isoform of cyclooxygenase, celecoxib inhibits the transformation of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin precursors. According to the National Academy of Sciences, Philip Needleman, who was vice president of Monsanto in 1989 and president of Searle in 1993 oversaw research into COX-2 that led to the development of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex).
Heme binds only to the peroxidase site of E-cat while substrates, as well as certain inhibitors (e.g. celecoxib), bind the COX site of E-cat.

Peptic ulcer disease

peptic ulcerstomach ulcerulcer
In theory, this selectivity allows celecoxib and other COX-2 inhibitors to reduce inflammation (and pain) while minimizing gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (e.g. stomach ulcers) that are common with nonselective NSAIDs.
Another type of NSAIDs, called COX-2 selective anti-inflammatory drugs (such as celecoxib), preferentially inhibit COX-2, which is less essential in the gastric mucosa.

Cyclooxygenase

COXcyclooxygenase 1cyclo-oxygenase
A highly selective reversible inhibitor of the COX-2 isoform of cyclooxygenase, celecoxib inhibits the transformation of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin precursors.
Selectivity for COX-2 is the main feature of celecoxib, etoricoxib, and other members of this drug class.

Rofecoxib

VioxxVioxx (Rofecoxib)
The COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib (Vioxx) was removed from the market in 2004 due to its risk. On March 11, 2009, Scott S. Reuben, former chief of acute pain at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts, revealed that the data for 21 studies he had authored for the efficacy of the drug (along with others such as Vioxx) had been fabricated.
On March 11, 2009, Scott S. Reuben, former chief of acute pain at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Mass., revealed that data for 21 studies he had authored for the efficacy of the drug (along with others such as celecoxib) had been fabricated in order to augment the analgesic effects of the drugs.

CDH11

Cadherin-11cadherin 11
Celecoxib binds to Cadherin-11 (which may explain the reduction in cancer progression).
Arthritis drug celecoxib binds to CDH11.

Parecoxib

Celecoxib and other COX-2 selective inhibitors, valdecoxib, parecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley.
Parecoxib, along with other COX-2 selective inhibitors, celecoxib, valdecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley.

Scott Reuben

Scott S. Reuben
On March 11, 2009, Scott S. Reuben, former chief of acute pain at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts, revealed that the data for 21 studies he had authored for the efficacy of the drug (along with others such as Vioxx) had been fabricated.
The hospital asked the journals to retract the studies, which reported favorable results from painkillers including Pfizer Inc.'s Bextra, Celebrex and Lyrica and Merck & Co. Inc.'s Vioxx.

Philip Needleman

According to the National Academy of Sciences, Philip Needleman, who was vice president of Monsanto in 1989 and president of Searle in 1993 oversaw research into COX-2 that led to the development of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex).
There he oversaw research into COX-2 that led to the development of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex), which was approved in 1998 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

G.D. Searle, LLC

G. D. Searle & CompanySearleG.D. Searle
Celecoxib and other COX-2 selective inhibitors, valdecoxib, parecoxib, and mavacoxib, were discovered by a team at the Searle division of Monsanto led by John Talley. According to the National Academy of Sciences, Philip Needleman, who was vice president of Monsanto in 1989 and president of Searle in 1993 oversaw research into COX-2 that led to the development of the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib (Celebrex).
In 1993 a team of researchers at Searle Research and Development filed a patent application for celecoxib, which Searle developed and which became the first selective COX-2 inhibitor to be approved by the FDA on December 31, 1998.

Colorectal cancer

colon cancerbowel cancerintestinal cancer
The use of celecoxib to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer has been investigated, but neither celecoxib nor any other drug is indicated for this use.
Aspirin and celecoxib appear to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer in those at high risk.

Inflammation

inflammatoryinflammatory responseinflamed
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In theory, this selectivity allows celecoxib and other COX-2 inhibitors to reduce inflammation (and pain) while minimizing gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (e.g. stomach ulcers) that are common with nonselective NSAIDs.

Pain

physical painacute painnociceptive pain
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

Ankylosing spondylitis

Bekhterev’s DiseaseBekhterev's Diseasespondylitis, ankylosing
It is used to treat the pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis, acute pain in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

Colorectal adenoma

villous adenomaTubulovillous adenomaTubular adenoma
It may also be used to decrease the risk of colorectal adenomas in people with familial adenomatous polyposis.