Celiac artery

celiac trunkceliacceliac axisArteria coeliacacoeliac arterycoeliac trunkcoeliac
The coeliac artery, also known as the coeliac trunk, or truncus coeliacus, is the first major branch of the abdominal aorta.wikipedia
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Superior mesenteric artery

superiorSuperior mesentericcranial mesenteric artery
Branching from the aorta at thoracic vertebra 12 (T12) in humans, it is one of three anterior/ midline branches of the abdominal aorta (the others are the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries).
In human anatomy, the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) arises from the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta, just inferior to the origin of the celiac trunk, and supplies the intestine from the lower part of the duodenum through two-thirds of the transverse colon, as well as the pancreas.

Abdominal aorta

abdominalabdominal aorticaorta, abdominal
The coeliac artery, also known as the coeliac trunk, or truncus coeliacus, is the first major branch of the abdominal aorta.

Inferior phrenic arteries

inferior phrenic arteryinferior phrenicLeft inferior phrenic artery
The celiac artery may also give rise to the inferior phrenic arteries.
They may arise separately from the front of the aorta, immediately above the celiac artery, or by a common trunk, which may spring either from the aorta or from the celiac artery.

Left gastric artery

left gastricleft gastric arteries
In human anatomy, the left gastric artery arises from the celiac artery and runs along the superior portion of the lesser curvature of the stomach.

Splenic artery

lienal artery
It branches from the celiac artery, and follows a course superior to the pancreas.

Hepatic artery proper

proper hepatic arteryHepatic arteryright hepatic artery
It raises from the common hepatic artery, a branch of the celiac artery.

Common hepatic artery

hepatic arteryhepatic arterieshepatic arterial
It arises from the celiac artery and has the following branches:

Gastroduodenal artery

gastroduodenal
The gastroduodenal artery most commonly arises from the common hepatic artery of the coeliac trunk, but there are numerous variations of the origin.

Spleen

splenicsplenetichilum
The celiac artery supplies oxygenated blood to the liver, stomach, abdominal esophagus, spleen and the superior half of both the duodenum and the pancreas.
However, it still shares the same blood supply—the celiac trunk—as the foregut organs.

Pancreas

pancreaticexocrine pancreaspancreatic development
The celiac artery supplies oxygenated blood to the liver, stomach, abdominal esophagus, spleen and the superior half of both the duodenum and the pancreas.
The pancreas has a rich blood supply, with vessels originating as branches of both the coeliac artery and superior mesenteric artery.

Stomach

gastriccardiafundus
The celiac artery supplies oxygenated blood to the liver, stomach, abdominal esophagus, spleen and the superior half of both the duodenum and the pancreas.
Over time, these arteries consolidate into the three main arteries that supply the developing gastrointestinal tract: the celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and inferior mesenteric artery.

Esophagus

oesophagusesophageallower esophageal sphincter
The celiac artery supplies oxygenated blood to the liver, stomach, abdominal esophagus, spleen and the superior half of both the duodenum and the pancreas.
Over time, these arteries consolidate into the three main arteries that supply the developing gastrointestinal tract: the celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and inferior mesenteric artery.

Left gastroepiploic artery

left gastro-omental arteryleft gastroepiploicgastroepiploic artery

Duodenum

duodenaldodecadactylumduodenal cap
The celiac artery supplies oxygenated blood to the liver, stomach, abdominal esophagus, spleen and the superior half of both the duodenum and the pancreas.
The superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries (from the gastroduodenal artery and SMA respectively) form an anastomotic loop between the celiac trunk and the SMA; so there is potential for collateral circulation here.

Foregut

fore-gutforegut developmentforegut tube
These structures correspond to the embryonic foregut.
Arterial supply to all these structures is from the celiac trunk, and venous drainage is by the portal venous system.

Gastrointestinal tract

intestinegastrointestinaldigestive tract
The celiac artery is the only major artery that nourishes the abdominal digestive organs that does not have a similarly named vein.

Median arcuate ligament syndrome

Coeliac artery compression syndrome
* Coeliac artery compression syndrome
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
Most blood returning from the digestive organs (including from the area of distribution of the celiac artery) is diverted to the liver via the portal venous system for further processing and detoxification in the liver before returning to the systemic circulation via the hepatic veins.
The vitelline arteries form the celiac, superior and inferior mesenteric arteries of the gastrointestinal tract.

Vitelline arteries

arteries
They give rise to the celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and inferior mesenteric artery.

Thoracic vertebrae

dorsal vertebraethoracic vertebrathoracic
Branching from the aorta at thoracic vertebra 12 (T12) in humans, it is one of three anterior/ midline branches of the abdominal aorta (the others are the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries).

Inferior mesenteric artery

inferior mesenteric arteriesinferior mesentericinferior
Branching from the aorta at thoracic vertebra 12 (T12) in humans, it is one of three anterior/ midline branches of the abdominal aorta (the others are the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries).