Cell-mediated immunity

cellular immunitycell-mediatedcellular immune responsecell mediated immunitycell-mediated immune responsecell-mediated immune responsescellular immune responsesT cell immunityT cell responseT-cell immunity
Cell-mediated immunity is an immune response that does not involve antibodies.wikipedia
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Humoral immunity

humoralhumoral immune responsehumoral response
Historically, the immune system was separated into two branches: humoral immunity, for which the protective function of immunization could be found in the humor (cell-free bodily fluid or serum) and cellular immunity, for which the protective function of immunization was associated with cells. The innate immune system and the adaptive immune system each comprise both humoral and cell-mediated components.
It contrasts with cell-mediated immunity.

Major histocompatibility complex

MHCmajor histocompatibility complex (MHC)HLA loci
These APCs, such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells in some circumstances, load antigenic peptides onto the MHC of the cell, in turn presenting the peptide to receptors on T cells.
By interacting with CD8 molecules on surfaces of cytotoxic T cells, MHC class I mediates destruction of infected or malignant host cells, the aspect of specific immunity termed cellular immunity.

T helper cell

Th1Th2T helper cells
CD4 cells or helper T cells provide protection against different pathogens.

Adaptive immune system

adaptive immunityadaptive immune responseadaptive
The innate immune system and the adaptive immune system each comprise both humoral and cell-mediated components.
Like the innate system, the acquired system includes both humoral immunity components and cell-mediated immunity components.

Antibody

antibodiesimmunoglobulinimmunoglobulins
Activated Effector T cells can be placed into three functioning classes, detecting peptide antigens originating from various types of pathogen: The first class being 1) Cytotoxic T cells, which kill infected target cells by apoptosis without using cytokines, 2) TH1 cells, which primarily function to activate macrophages, and 3) TH2 cells, which primarily function to stimulate B cells into producing antibodies.
These patches may improve the efficiency of the cellular immune response.

Transplant rejection

rejectiongraft rejectionorgan rejection
It also plays a major role in transplant rejection.
Though cytotoxic-crossmatch assay can predict rejection mediated by cellular immunity, genetic-expression tests specific to the organ type to be transplanted, for instance AlloMap Molecular Expression Testing, have a high negative predictive value.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune function
Both subsystems use humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity to perform their functions.

Immunity (medical)

immunityimmuneimmune response
Adaptive immunity can also be divided by the type of immune mediators involved; humoral immunity is the aspect of immunity that is mediated by secreted antibodies, whereas cell mediated immunity involves T-lymphocytes alone.

Cytokine

cytokineschemical signalscytokine-
They act through receptors, and are especially important in the immune system; cytokines modulate the balance between humoral and cell-based immune responses, and they regulate the maturation, growth, and responsiveness of particular cell populations.

Virus

virusesviralvirion
A second defence of vertebrates against viruses is called cell-mediated immunity and involves immune cells known as T cells.

Blood plasma

plasmaserumblood serum
Historically, the immune system was separated into two branches: humoral immunity, for which the protective function of immunization could be found in the humor (cell-free bodily fluid or serum) and cellular immunity, for which the protective function of immunization was associated with cells.

CD4

CD4+CD4 + CD4 count
CD4 cells or helper T cells provide protection against different pathogens.

Naive T cell

naive T cellsnaivenaive T lymphocytes
Naive T cells, mature T cells that have yet to encounter an antigen, are converted into activated effector T cells after encountering antigen-presenting cells (APCs).

Antigen

antigensantigenicantigenic proteins
Naive T cells, mature T cells that have yet to encounter an antigen, are converted into activated effector T cells after encountering antigen-presenting cells (APCs).

Antigen-presenting cell

antigen-presenting cellsantigen presenting cellantigen presenting cells
Naive T cells, mature T cells that have yet to encounter an antigen, are converted into activated effector T cells after encountering antigen-presenting cells (APCs).

Dendritic cell

dendritic cellsmyeloid dendritic cellsdendritic
These APCs, such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells in some circumstances, load antigenic peptides onto the MHC of the cell, in turn presenting the peptide to receptors on T cells.

B cell

B cellsB-cellB lymphocytes
These APCs, such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells in some circumstances, load antigenic peptides onto the MHC of the cell, in turn presenting the peptide to receptors on T cells. Activated Effector T cells can be placed into three functioning classes, detecting peptide antigens originating from various types of pathogen: The first class being 1) Cytotoxic T cells, which kill infected target cells by apoptosis without using cytokines, 2) TH1 cells, which primarily function to activate macrophages, and 3) TH2 cells, which primarily function to stimulate B cells into producing antibodies.

Peptide

polypeptidepeptidespolypeptides
Activated Effector T cells can be placed into three functioning classes, detecting peptide antigens originating from various types of pathogen: The first class being 1) Cytotoxic T cells, which kill infected target cells by apoptosis without using cytokines, 2) TH1 cells, which primarily function to activate macrophages, and 3) TH2 cells, which primarily function to stimulate B cells into producing antibodies.

Pathogen

pathogenspathogenicpathogenicity
Activated Effector T cells can be placed into three functioning classes, detecting peptide antigens originating from various types of pathogen: The first class being 1) Cytotoxic T cells, which kill infected target cells by apoptosis without using cytokines, 2) TH1 cells, which primarily function to activate macrophages, and 3) TH2 cells, which primarily function to stimulate B cells into producing antibodies.

Apoptosis

apoptoticprogrammed cell deathcell death
Activated Effector T cells can be placed into three functioning classes, detecting peptide antigens originating from various types of pathogen: The first class being 1) Cytotoxic T cells, which kill infected target cells by apoptosis without using cytokines, 2) TH1 cells, which primarily function to activate macrophages, and 3) TH2 cells, which primarily function to stimulate B cells into producing antibodies.

Innate immune system

innate immunityinnateinnate immune response
The innate immune system and the adaptive immune system each comprise both humoral and cell-mediated components.

Phagocyte

phagocytesphagocytic cellsphagocytic
Cell-mediated immunity is directed primarily at microbes that survive in phagocytes and microbes that infect non-phagocytic cells.

Microorganism

microorganismsmicrobemicrobes
Cell-mediated immunity is directed primarily at microbes that survive in phagocytes and microbes that infect non-phagocytic cells.

Fungus

Fungifungalnecrotrophic
It is most effective in removing virus-infected cells, but also participates in defending against fungi, protozoans, cancers, and intracellular bacteria.

Protozoa

protozoanprotozoanspellicle
It is most effective in removing virus-infected cells, but also participates in defending against fungi, protozoans, cancers, and intracellular bacteria.