Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networksfrequency reusemobile phone networkmobilecellnetworkmobile phone networkscellular systems
A cellular network or mobile network is a communication network where the last link is wireless.wikipedia
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Tablet computer

tabletstabletTablet PC
This enables numerous portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, tablets and laptops equipped with mobile broadband modems, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.
Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inch or larger, measured diagonally, and may not support access to a cellular network.

Cell site

cell towercell towerscell phone tower
The network is distributed over land areas called "cells", each served by at least one fixed-location transceiver, but more normally, three cell sites or base transceiver stations.
A cell site, cell tower, or cellular base station is a cellular-enabled mobile device site where antennae and electronic communications equipment are placed—typically on a radio mast, tower, or other raised structure—to create a cell (or adjacent cells) in a cellular network.

Mobile phone

cell phonemobile phonesmobile
This enables numerous portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, tablets and laptops equipped with mobile broadband modems, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.
Modern mobile telephone services use a cellular network architecture, and, therefore, mobile telephones are called cellular telephones or cell phones, in North America.

Co-channel interference

co-channelinterferencesame channel
The group of frequencies can be reused in other cells, provided that the same frequencies are not reused in adjacent cells, which would cause co-channel interference.
In cellular mobile communication (GSM & LTE Systems, for instance), frequency spectrum is a precious resource which is divided into non-overlapping spectrum bands which are assigned to different cells (In cellular communications, a cell refers to the hexagonal/circular area around the base station antenna).

1G

first generationfirst-generationAnalog Networks
The first commercial cellular network, the 1G generation, was launched in Japan by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) in 1979, initially in the metropolitan area of Tokyo.
1G refers to the first generation of wireless cellular technology (mobile telecommunications).

Wireless network

wireless networkingwireless networkswireless
It was an analog wireless network.
Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks.

2G

2.5G2.75G2.5
The first commercial digital cellular network, the 2G generation, was launched in 1991.
2G (or 2-G) is short for second-generation cellular technology.

Personal Communications Service

PCS1900 MHzBand 2 (PCS)
To distinguish signals from several different transmitters, frequency-division multiple access (FDMA, used by analog and D-AMPS systems), time-division multiple access (TDMA, used by GSM) and code-division multiple access (CDMA, first used for PCS, and the basis of 4G LTE) were developed.
More specifically, PCS refers to any of several types of wireless voice or wireless data communications systems, typically incorporating digital technology, providing services similar to advanced cellular mobile or paging services.

Wireless

wireless communicationwireless communicationswireless internet
A cellular network or mobile network is a communication network where the last link is wireless.
The wireless revolution began in the 1990s, with the advent of digital wireless networks leading to a social revolution, and a paradigm shift from wired to wireless technology, including the proliferation of commercial wireless technologies such as cell phones, mobile telephony, pagers, wireless computer networks, cellular networks, the wireless Internet, and laptop and handheld computers with wireless connections.

MOSFET

metal-oxide-semiconductorMOSMOS integrated circuit
This was enabled by advances in MOSFET technology.
MOS technology, including MOS integrated circuit chips and discrete power MOSFETs, are fundamental to modern computers and communications infrastructure, such as the Internet, digital telephony, wireless telecommunications, and mobile networks.

Mobile telephony

mobile communicationmobile telecommunicationsmobile communications
Commonly, for example in mobile telephony systems, the most important use of broadcast information is to set up channels for one-to-one communication between the mobile transceiver and the base station.
Mobile phones connect to a terrestrial cellular network of base stations (cell sites), whereas satellite phones connect to orbiting satellites.

Antenna diversity

space diversitydiversityDiversity coding
Other available methods of multiplexing such as MIMO, a more sophisticated version of antenna diversity, combined with active beamforming provides much greater spatial multiplexing ability compared to original AMPS cells, that typically only addressed one to three unique spaces.

Power MOSFET

VDMOSpFET resistanceUMOS
The MOSFET, originally invented by Mohamed M. Atalla and Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs in 1959, was adapted for cellular networks by the early 1990s, with the wide adoption of power MOSFET, LDMOS (RF amplifier) and RF CMOS (RF circuit) devices leading to the development and proliferation of digital wireless mobile networks.
With the introduction of the 2G digital mobile network in 1995, the LDMOS became the most widely used RF power amplifier in mobile networks such as 2G, 3G, and 4G.

Handover

handoffhanded offhanded over
This is called the handover or handoff.
In cellular telecommunications, the terms handover or handoff refer to the process of transferring an ongoing call or data session from one channel connected to the core network to another channel.

Duplex (telecommunications)

half-duplexfull-duplexduplex
Each cellular call was assigned a pair of frequencies (one for base to mobile, the other for mobile to base) to provide full-duplex operation.
Where channel access methods are used in point-to-multipoint networks (such as cellular networks) for dividing forward and reverse communication channels on the same physical communications medium, they are known as duplexing methods.

Mobile computing

mobilemobile computermobile computers
This allows mobile phones and mobile computing devices to be connected to the public switched telephone network and public Internet.
Cellular data service uses technologies GSM, CDMA or GPRS, 3G networks such as W-CDMA, EDGE or CDMA2000.

LDMOS

lateral-diffused metal-oxide semiconductor
The MOSFET, originally invented by Mohamed M. Atalla and Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs in 1959, was adapted for cellular networks by the early 1990s, with the wide adoption of power MOSFET, LDMOS (RF amplifier) and RF CMOS (RF circuit) devices leading to the development and proliferation of digital wireless mobile networks.
The silicon-based LDMOS is the most widely used power amplifier in mobile networks.

GSM

Global System for Mobile CommunicationsGSM networkGSM (850/900/1800/1900)
The details of the process of paging vary somewhat from network to network, but normally we know a limited number of cells where the phone is located (this group of cells is called a Location Area in the GSM or UMTS system, or Routing Area if a data packet session is involved; in LTE, cells are grouped into Tracking Areas). Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
The Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) is a standard developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) to describe the protocols for second-generation (2G) digital cellular networks used by mobile devices such as mobile phones and tablets.

Public switched telephone network

PSTNpublic telephone networktelephone network
This allows mobile phones and mobile computing devices to be connected to the public switched telephone network and public Internet.
The PSTN consists of telephone lines, fiber optic cables, microwave transmission links, cellular networks, communications satellites, and undersea telephone cables, all interconnected by switching centers, thus allowing most telephones to communicate with each other.

Base station subsystem

BSCbase station controllerbase station controllers
The base station subsystem (BSS) is the section of a traditional cellular telephone network which is responsible for handling traffic and signaling between a mobile phone and the network switching subsystem.

Time-division multiple access

TDMAtime division multiple accessDynamic TDMA
To distinguish signals from several different transmitters, frequency-division multiple access (FDMA, used by analog and D-AMPS systems), time-division multiple access (TDMA, used by GSM) and code-division multiple access (CDMA, first used for PCS, and the basis of 4G LTE) were developed. This is a form of time-division multiple access (TDMA). Radio channels effectively use the transmission medium through the use of the following multiplexing and access schemes: frequency division multiple access (FDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), code division multiple access (CDMA), and space division multiple access (SDMA).
TDMA is used in the digital 2G cellular systems such as Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), IS-136, Personal Digital Cellular (PDC) and iDEN, and in the Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) standard for portable phones.

RF power amplifier

RF amplifierpower amplifieramplified
The MOSFET, originally invented by Mohamed M. Atalla and Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs in 1959, was adapted for cellular networks by the early 1990s, with the wide adoption of power MOSFET, LDMOS (RF amplifier) and RF CMOS (RF circuit) devices leading to the development and proliferation of digital wireless mobile networks.
RF power amplifiers using LDMOS (laterally diffused MOSFET) are the most widely used power semiconductor devices in wireless telecommunication networks, particularly mobile networks.

Space-division multiple access

SDMAspace division multiple accessSpace Division Multiple Access (SDMA)
Radio channels effectively use the transmission medium through the use of the following multiplexing and access schemes: frequency division multiple access (FDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), code division multiple access (CDMA), and space division multiple access (SDMA).
In traditional mobile cellular network systems, the base station has no information on the position of the mobile units within the cell and radiates the signal in all directions within the cell in order to provide radio coverage.

Advanced Mobile Phone System

AMPSanalogAdvanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS)
Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
AMPS is a first-generation cellular technology that uses separate frequencies, or "channels", for each conversation (see frequency-division multiple access (FDMA)).

Mobile technology

mobile technologiesmobilecellular technology
Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
Mobile technology is the technology used for cellular communication.