Cellular network

cellularmobile networkcellular networksfrequency reusemobile phone networkMobilecellnetworkmobile phone networkscellular systems
A cellular network or mobile network is a communication network where the last link is wireless.wikipedia
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Tablet computer

tabletstablettablet PC
This enables a large number of portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, tablets and laptops equipped with mobile broadband modems, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.
Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inch or larger, measured diagonally, and may not support access to a cellular network.

Cell site

cell towercell towerscell phone tower
The network is distributed over land areas called cells, each served by at least one fixed-location transceiver, but more normally three cell sites or base transceiver stations.
A cell site, cell tower, or cellular base station is a cellular-enabled mobile device site where antennae and electronic communications equipment are placed — typically on a radio mast, tower, or other raised structure — to create a cell (or adjacent cells) in a cellular network.

Mobile phone

cell phonemobilemobile phones
This enables a large number of portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, tablets and laptops equipped with mobile broadband modems, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.
Modern mobile telephone services use a cellular network architecture, and, therefore, mobile telephones are called cellular telephones or cell phones, in North America.

1G

first generationfirst-generationAnalog Networks
The first commercial cellular network, the 1G generation, was launched in Japan by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) in 1979, initially in the metropolitan area of Tokyo.
1G refers to the first generation of wireless cellular technology (mobile telecommunications).

Co-channel interference

co-channelinterferencesame channel
The group of frequencies can be reused in other cells, provided that the same frequencies are not reused in adjacent neighboring cells as that would cause co-channel interference.
In cellular mobile communication (GSM & LTE Systems, for instance), frequency spectrum is a precious resource which is divided into non-overlapping spectrum bands which are assigned to different cells (In cellular communications, a cell refers to the hexagonal/circular area around the base station antenna).

Mobile telephony

mobile communicationmobile telecommunicationsmobile communications
Commonly, for example in mobile telephony systems, the most important use of broadcast information is to set up channels for one-to-one communication between the mobile transceiver and the base station.
Mobile phones connect to a terrestrial cellular network of base stations (cell sites), whereas satellite phones connect to orbiting satellites.

Handover

handoffhanded overhand off
This is called the handover or handoff.
In cellular telecommunications, the terms handover or handoff refer to the process of transferring an ongoing call or data session from one channel connected to the core network to another channel.

GSM

GSM (850/900/1800/1900) GSM/GPRS/EDGEGSM technology
The details of the process of paging vary somewhat from network to network, but normally we know a limited number of cells where the phone is located (this group of cells is called a Location Area in the GSM or UMTS system, or Routing Area if a data packet session is involved; in LTE, cells are grouped into Tracking Areas). Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
GSM (Global System for Mobile communications) is a standard developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) to describe the protocols for second-generation (2G) digital cellular networks used by mobile devices such as tablets.

Polarization-division multiple access

Other available methods of multiplexing such as polarization-division multiple access (PDMA) cannot be used to separate signals from one cell to the next since the effects of both vary with position and this would make signal separation practically impossible.
Polarization-division multiple access (PDMA) is a channel access method used in some cellular networks.

Public switched telephone network

PSTNtelephone networkpublic telephone network
This allows mobile phones and mobile computing devices to be connected to the public switched telephone network and public Internet.
The PSTN consists of telephone lines, fiber optic cables, microwave transmission links, cellular networks, communications satellites, and undersea telephone cables, all interconnected by switching centers, thus allowing most telephones to communicate with each other.

Base station subsystem

BSCbase station controllerbase station controllers
A network of radio base stations forming the base station subsystem.
The base station subsystem (BSS) is the section of a traditional cellular telephone network which is responsible for handling traffic and signaling between a mobile phone and the network switching subsystem.

Space-division multiple access

SDMAspace division multiple accessSpace Division Multiple Access (SDMA)
Radio channels effectively use the transmission medium through the use of the following multiplexing and access schemes: frequency division multiple access (FDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), code division multiple access (CDMA), and space division multiple access (SDMA).
In traditional mobile cellular network systems, the base station has no information on the position of the mobile units within the cell and radiates the signal in all directions within the cell in order to provide radio coverage.

Time-division multiple access

TDMAtime division multiple accessdynamic TDMA
Radio channels effectively use the transmission medium through the use of the following multiplexing and access schemes: frequency division multiple access (FDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), code division multiple access (CDMA), and space division multiple access (SDMA). This is, in a sense, time-division multiple access (TDMA).
TDMA is used in the digital 2G cellular systems such as Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), IS-136, Personal Digital Cellular (PDC) and iDEN, and in the Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) standard for portable phones.

Mobile technology

mobile technologiesmobilecellular technology
Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
Mobile technology is the technology used for cellular communication.

Pager

pagingpagersbeeper
This enables a large number of portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, tablets and laptops equipped with mobile broadband modems, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.
One such type of location is a large hospital complex, where cellular coverage is often weak or non-existent, where radio transmitters are thought to interfere with sensitive medical equipment and where there is a greater need of assurance for a timely delivery of a message.

Picocell

picopico cellpico cells
Picocell, less than 200 metres
In cellular networks, picocells are typically used to extend coverage to indoor areas where outdoor signals do not reach well, or to add network capacity in areas with very dense phone usage, such as train stations or stadiums.

Advanced Mobile Phone System

AMPSanalogAdvanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS)
Since almost all mobile phones use cellular technology, including GSM, CDMA, and AMPS (analog), the term "cell phone" is in some regions, notably the US, used interchangeably with "mobile phone".
AMPS is a first-generation cellular technology that uses separate frequencies, or "channels", for each conversation (see frequency-division multiple access (FDMA)).

List of mobile network operators

List of mobile network operators worldwide14th largestcovers virtually all parts of the world
List of mobile network operators (summary)
This is a list of mobile network and satellite phone network operators measured by number of subscriptions.

Cellular frequencies

cellularbandscellular spectrum
Cellular frequencies
Cellular frequencies are the sets of frequency ranges within the ultra high frequency band that have been assigned for cellular-compatible mobile devices, such as mobile phones, to connect to cellular networks.

Radio resource management

radio-resource managementRadio Resourceradio resources
Radio resource management (RRM)
Radio resource management (RRM) is the system level management of co-channel interference, radio resources, and other radio transmission characteristics in wireless communication systems, for example cellular networks, wireless local area networks, wireless sensor systems radio broadcasting networks.

Mobile computing

mobilemobile computermobile computers
This allows mobile phones and mobile computing devices to be connected to the public switched telephone network and public Internet.
Wireless data connections used in mobile computing take three general forms so. Cellular data service uses technologies GSM, CDMA or GPRS, 3G networks such as W-CDMA, EDGE or CDMA2000.

Mobile edge computing

Mobile edge computing
Multi-access edge computing (MEC), formerly mobile edge computing, is a network architecture concept that enables cloud computing capabilities and an IT service environment at the edge of the cellular network and, more in general at the edge of any network.

Power control

transmit power controlAutomatic transmit power control
As the receiver moves away from the transmitter, the power received decreases, so the power control algorithm of the transmitter increases the power it transmits to restore the level of received power.
Power control algorithms are used in many contexts, including cellular networks, sensor networks, wireless LANs, and DSL modems.

Routing in cellular networks

cellular
Routing in cellular networks
Most cellular network routing issues in different cells can be attributed to the multiple access methods used for transmission.

Microcell

micro-cellularmicro
Microcell, less than 2 kilometres
Like picocells, microcells are usually used to add network capacity in areas with very dense phone usage, such as train stations.