Cellular neuroscience

cellularcytology
Cellular neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience concerned with the study of neurons at a cellular level.wikipedia
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Neuroscience

neurobiologyneuroscientistneurosciences
Cellular neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience concerned with the study of neurons at a cellular level.
It is a multidisciplinary branch of biology that combines physiology, anatomy, molecular biology, developmental biology, cytology, mathematical modeling and psychology to understand the fundamental and emergent properties of neurons and neural circuits.

Morphology (biology)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
This includes morphology and physiological properties of single neurons.

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
This includes morphology and physiological properties of single neurons.

Neuron

neuronsnerve cellsnerve cell
Cellular neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience concerned with the study of neurons at a cellular level.

Photoreceptor cell

photoreceptorsphotoreceptorphotoreceptor cells
Some neurons such as photoreceptor cells, for example, do not have myelinated axons that conduct action potentials.

Alan Hodgkin

Alan Lloyd HodgkinHodgkinSir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin
Much of the current knowledge of action potentials comes from squid axon experiments by Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin and Sir Andrew Huxley.

Andrew Huxley

Andrew Fielding HuxleySir Andrew HuxleyHuxley
Much of the current knowledge of action potentials comes from squid axon experiments by Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin and Sir Andrew Huxley.

Hodgkin–Huxley model

Hodgkin-Huxley modelHodgkin–Huxleyaction potential theory
The Hodgkin–Huxley model of an action potential in the squid giant axon has been the basis for much of the current understanding of the ionic bases of action potentials.

Action potential

action potentialsnerve impulsenerve impulses
The Hodgkin–Huxley model of an action potential in the squid giant axon has been the basis for much of the current understanding of the ionic bases of action potentials.

Squid giant axon

giant axonsquid axonEscape reflex in squid
The Hodgkin–Huxley model of an action potential in the squid giant axon has been the basis for much of the current understanding of the ionic bases of action potentials.

Positive feedback

positive feedback looppositiveexacerbated
Such a process is also known as a positive feedback loop.

Synapse

synapsessynapticpresynaptic
Neurons communicate with one another via synapses.

Communication

communicationsSocial Communicationcommunicate
A neurotransmitter is a chemical messenger that is synthesized within neurons themselves and released by these same neurons to communicate with their postsynaptic target cells.

Exocytosis

releaseneurotransmitter releaseexocytotic
Once bounded with Ca 2+, the vesicles dock and fuse with the presynaptic membrane, and release neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft by a process known as exocytosis.

Gamma-Aminobutyric acid

GABAγ-aminobutyric acidGABAergic
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Glutamic acid

glutamateL-glutamateGlu
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Dopamine

dopaminergic systemDAdopaminergic
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Norepinephrine

noradrenalinenoradrenergicnoradrenalin
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Adrenaline

epinephrineadrenaline junkieadrenalin
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Melanin

eumelaninpheomelaninphaeomelanin
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Serotonin

5-HTserotonergic5-hydroxytryptamine
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Melatonin

CircadinmelatonergicN-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Endorphins

endorphinendorphinebeta endorphins
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Dynorphin

dynorphins
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.

Nociceptin

nociceptin (N/OFQ)Nociceptin/orphanin FQpronociceptin
Although slower than ionotropic receptors that function as on-and-off switches, metabotropic receptors have the advantage of changing the cell's responsiveness to ions and other metabolites, examples being gamma amino-butyric acid (inhibitory transmitter), glutamic acid (excitatory transmitter), dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, melanin, serotonin, melatonin, endorphins, dynorphins, nociceptin, and substance P.