Celluloid

ParkesineXylonitefilmcelluloid filmBritish Xylonite Ltd.celluloid negativescelluloid photographic filmcelluloid stripFrench ivorynitrate film
Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, with added dyes and other agents.wikipedia
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Table tennis

ping pongping-pongtable-tennis
Celluloid is highly flammable, difficult and expensive to produce and no longer widely used; its most common uses today are in table tennis balls, musical instruments, and guitar picks.
The next major innovation was by James W. Gibb, a British enthusiast of table tennis, who discovered novelty celluloid balls on a trip to the US in 1901 and found them to be ideal for the game.

Guitar pick

pickpickingpicks
Celluloid is highly flammable, difficult and expensive to produce and no longer widely used; its most common uses today are in table tennis balls, musical instruments, and guitar picks.
Picks are generally made of one uniform material—such as some kind of plastic (nylon, Delrin, celluloid), rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, tagua, or stone.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
Parkesine was made from cellulose treated with nitric acid and a solvent.
Cellulose was used to produce the first successful thermoplastic polymer, celluloid, by Hyatt Manufacturing Company in 1870.

John Wesley Hyatt

Hyatt, John WesleyJohn and Isaiah Hyatt
In the 1860s, an American, John Wesley Hyatt, acquired Parkes's patent and began experimenting with cellulose nitrate with the intention of manufacturing billiard balls, which until that time were made from ivory.
He is mainly known for simplifying the production of celluloid, the first industrial plastic.

Billiard ball

billiard ballscue ballballs
In the 1860s, an American, John Wesley Hyatt, acquired Parkes's patent and began experimenting with cellulose nitrate with the intention of manufacturing billiard balls, which until that time were made from ivory.
By 1870 it was commercially branded Celluloid, the first industrial plastic.

Camphor

camphoraceous(+)-camphorcampher
Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, with added dyes and other agents.
In the early decades of the plastics industry, camphor was used in immense quantities as the plasticizer that creates celluloid from nitrocellulose, in nitrocellulose lacquers and other plastics and lacquers.

Alexander Parkes

Parkes, Alexander
]]The first celluloid as a bulk material for forming objects was made in 1855 in Birmingham, England, by Alexander Parkes, who was never able to see his invention reach full fruition, after his firm went bankrupt due to scale-up costs.

John Carbutt

English photographer John Carbutt founded the Keystone Dry Plate Works in 1879 with the intention of producing gelatin dry plates.
He came to be the first to use celluloid for photographic film and to market dry-plate glass negatives.

Photographic film

filmfilm camerafilms
In 1878 Hyatt was able to patent a process for injection moulding thermoplastics, although it took another fifty years before it could be realised commercially, and in later years celluloid was used as the base for photographic film.
It was made from highly flammable nitrocellulose ("celluloid"), now usually called "nitrate film".

Daniel Spill

English inventor Daniel Spill had worked with Parkes and formed the Xylonite Co. to take over Parkes' patents, describing the new plastic products as Xylonite.
For over 20 years Spill had pursued the goal of making a successful business from Alexander Parkes' invention Parkesine, the first man-made plastic.

Nitrocellulose

nitrate filmguncottoncellulose nitrate
Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, with added dyes and other agents.
In 1855, the first man-made plastic, nitrocellulose (branded Parkesine, patented in 1862), was created by Alexander Parkes from cellulose treated with nitric acid and a solvent.

Film

motion picturemoviefilms
A 15 in sheet of Carbutt's film was used by William Dickson for the early Edison motion picture experiments on a cylinder drum Kinetograph.
By the end of the 1880s, the introduction of lengths of celluloid photographic film and the invention of motion picture cameras, which could photograph an indefinitely long rapid sequence of images using only one lens, allowed several minutes of action to be captured and stored on a single compact reel of film.

William Kennedy Dickson

William K. L. DicksonWilliam K.L. DicksonWilliam Kennedy Laurie Dickson
A 15 in sheet of Carbutt's film was used by William Dickson for the early Edison motion picture experiments on a cylinder drum Kinetograph.
William Dickson invented the first, practical, celluloid film, for this application.

Film base

baseNitratebases
However, the celluloid film base produced by this means was still considered too stiff for the needs of motion-picture photography.
Film stock with a nitrate base was the first transparent flexible plasticized base commercially available, thanks to celluloid developments by John Carbutt, Hannibal Goodwin, and Eastman Kodak in the 1880s.

Slide rule

slide rulescircular slide ruleslide-rule
Celluloid was also a popular material in the construction of slide rules.
Scales were made of celluloid, plastic, or painted aluminium.

Green eyeshade

visorgreen eyeshades
*Green eyeshade
Green eyeshades were often made of a transparent dark green or blue-green colored celluloid, although leather and paper were used to make the visor portion as well.

Chemical compound

compoundcompoundschemical compounds
Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, with added dyes and other agents.

Thermoplastic

thermoplasticsthermoplastic polymerplastic
Generally considered the first thermoplastic, it was first created as Parkesine in 1856 and as Xylonite in 1869, before being registered as Celluloid in 1870.

Molding (process)

moldmoldingmould
Celluloid is easily molded and shaped, and it was first widely used as an ivory replacement.

Ivory

elephant ivorymammoth ivoryivories
In the 1860s, an American, John Wesley Hyatt, acquired Parkes's patent and began experimenting with cellulose nitrate with the intention of manufacturing billiard balls, which until that time were made from ivory. Celluloid is easily molded and shaped, and it was first widely used as an ivory replacement.

Cellulose acetate

acetateCellonacetate microfilm
The main use was in movie and photography film industries, which used only celluloid film stock prior to the adoption of acetate safety film in the 1950s.

Collodion

wet plate collodioncollodiumwet plate
Collodion, invented in 1848 and used as a wound dressing and an emulsion for photographic plates, is dried to a celluloid-like film.

Birmingham

Birmingham, United KingdomBirmingham, EnglandCity of Birmingham
]]The first celluloid as a bulk material for forming objects was made in 1855 in Birmingham, England, by Alexander Parkes, who was never able to see his invention reach full fruition, after his firm went bankrupt due to scale-up costs.

Nitric acid

nitricHNO 3 aqua fortis
Parkesine was made from cellulose treated with nitric acid and a solvent.

Solvent

solventsorganic solventorganic solvents
Parkesine was made from cellulose treated with nitric acid and a solvent.