Cemetery

cemeteriesgraveyardburial groundburial groundsgraveyardsmonumental cemeteryburying groundfamily cemeterykabristanburial
A cemetery or graveyard is a place where the remains of dead people are buried or otherwise interred.wikipedia
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Mausoleum

mausoleamausoleumsmortuary chapel
The intact or cremated remains of people may be interred in a grave, commonly referred to as burial, or in a tomb, an "above-ground grave" (resembling a sarcophagus), a mausoleum, columbarium, niche, or other edifice.
Mausolea may be located in a cemetery, a churchyard or on private land.

Grave field

Alemannic cemeteryprehistoric cemeteryAlamannic grave field
Neolithic cemeteries are sometimes referred to by the term "grave field".
A grave field is a prehistoric cemetery, typically of Bronze Age and Iron Age Europe.

Taforalt

Taforalt CavesCave of TaforaltGrottes des Pigeons
Taforalt cave in Morocco is the oldest known cemetery in the world.
Taforalt or Grotte des Pigeons is a cave in northern Oujda, Morocco, and possibly the oldest cemetery in North Africa (Humphrey et al. 2012).

Churchyard

kirkyardconsecrated groundunconsecrated ground
The term graveyard is often used interchangeably with cemetery, but a graveyard primarily refers to a burial ground within a churchyard.
While churchyards can be any patch of land on church grounds, historically, they were often used as graveyards (burial places).

Headstone

tombstonegravestonetombstones
Mourners who could afford the work of a stonemason had a headstone engraved with a name, dates of birth and death and sometimes other biographical data, and set up over the place of burial.
Many cemeteries and churchyards have removed those extra stones to ease grass cutting by machine mower.

Père Lachaise Cemetery

cimetière du Père-LachaisePère-Lachaise CemeteryPère-Lachaise
An early example of a landscape-style cemetery is Père Lachaise in Paris.
Père Lachaise Cemetery (Cimetière du Père-Lachaise ; formerly cimetière de l'Est, "Cemetery of the East") is the largest cemetery in Paris, France (44 ha).

Magnificent Seven cemeteries

Magnificent SevenSeven large cemeteriesmajor metropolitan cemeteries
The Magnificent Seven, seven large cemeteries around London, were established in the following decade, starting with Kensal Green in 1832.
The "Magnificent Seven" is an informal term applied to seven large private cemeteries in London.

Rural cemetery

garden cemeteryrural cemeteriesgarden cemeteries
Because these cemeteries were usually on the outskirts of town (where land was plentiful and cheap), they were called "rural cemeteries", a term still used to describe them today.
The rural cemetery or garden cemetery is a style of cemetery that became popular in the United States and Europe in the mid-nineteenth century due to the overcrowding and health concerns of urban cemeteries.

Sexton (office)

sextonsextonscaretaker
Early urban cemeteries were churchyards, which filled quickly and exhibited a haphazard placement of burial markers as sextons tried to squeeze new burials into the remaining space.
A sexton is an officer of a church, congregation, or synagogue charged with the maintenance of its buildings or the surrounding graveyard.

Receiving vault

Receiving vaults and crypts often needed to be aired before entering, as decomposing corpses used up so much oxygen that even candles could not remain lit. The sheer stench from decomposing corpses, even when buried deeply, was overpowering in areas adjacent to the urban cemetery.
A receiving vault or receiving tomb, sometimes also known as a public vault, is a structure designed to temporarily store dead bodies in winter months when the ground is too frozen to dig a permanent grave in a cemetery.

Mount Auburn Cemetery

Mt. Auburn CemeteryMount AuburnMount Auburn Cemetery Reception House
The first garden/rural cemetery in the United States was Mount Auburn Cemetery near Boston, Massachusetts, founded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in 1831.
Dedicated in 1831 and set with classical monuments in a rolling landscaped terrain, it marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards.

Columbarium

columbariacolumbāriacolumbarii
The intact or cremated remains of people may be interred in a grave, commonly referred to as burial, or in a tomb, an "above-ground grave" (resembling a sarcophagus), a mausoleum, columbarium, niche, or other edifice. Columbarium walls are a common feature of many cemeteries, reflecting the increasing use of cremation rather than burial.

Natural burial

green burialnatural burial groundEco-cemetery
A natural cemetery, eco-cemetery, green cemetery or conservation cemetery, is a new style of cemetery as an area set aside for natural burials (with or without coffins).
Natural burials can take place both on private land (subject to regulations) and in any cemetery that will accommodate the vault-free technique.

Cross Bones

Cross Bones GraveyardRed Cross StreetWinchester geese
The Cross Bones is a burial ground for prostitutes in London.
Cross Bones is a disused post-medieval burial ground on Redcross Way in Southwark, south London.

Crypt

cryptsconfessioburial aisle
In most cultures those who were vastly rich, had important professions, were part of the nobility or were of any other high social status were usually buried in individual crypts inside or beneath the relevant place of worship with an indication of their name, date of death and other biographical data.
Crypts are usually found in cemeteries and under public religious buildings, such as churches or cathedrals, but are also occasionally found beneath mausolea or chapels on personal estates.

Gravedigger

grave diggergravediggersgrave-digger
Cemetery authorities normally employ a full-time staff of caretakers to dig graves.
A gravedigger is a cemetery worker who is responsible for digging a grave prior to a funeral service.

Coffin

casketcoffinscaskets
A natural cemetery, eco-cemetery, green cemetery or conservation cemetery, is a new style of cemetery as an area set aside for natural burials (with or without coffins).
Some countries practice one form almost exclusively, whereas in others it may depend on the individual cemetery.

Cremation

crematedcrematoriaashes
Columbarium walls are a common feature of many cemeteries, reflecting the increasing use of cremation rather than burial.
A crematorium may be part of a chapel or a funeral home or may be an independent facility or a service offered by a cemetery.

Corpse road

Corpse roadscoffin roadCoffin Route
Corpse roads provided a practical means for transporting corpses, often from remote communities, to cemeteries that had burial rights, such as parish churches and chapels of ease.

Lists of cemeteries

List of cemeteriesburial placeLists of cemeteries by country
These lists of cemeteries compile notable cemeteries, mausolea, and other places people are buried worldwide.

Shrine

shrinesenshrinedsacred site
In particular, in an era in which the death of children is now relatively uncommon, some parents create quite large shrines at their child's grave, decorating them with toys, wind chimes, statues of angels and cherubs, etc. as a manifestation of their grief, adding items to the pile of objects on the grave progressively over time.
Shrines can be found in various settings, such as churches, temples, cemeteries, museums, or in the home.

Necropolis

necropoleisnecropolinecropoles
A necropolis (plural necropolises, necropoles, necropoleis, necropoli ) is a large, designed cemetery with elaborate tomb monuments.

Unmarked grave

unmarked
However, in cultures that mark burial sites, the phrase unmarked grave has taken on a metaphorical meaning.

Potter's field

pauper's gravecommon gravepauper's cemetery
A potter's field, paupers' grave or common grave is a place for the burial of unknown, unclaimed or indigent people.