Central America

CentralCentral AmericanCentral American IsthmusGeography of Central AmericaCentral AmericansGeology of Central AmericaCentroaméricaCentral American countriesCentral,Central-
Central America (América Central, Centroamérica ) is a region found in the southern tip of North America and is sometimes defined as a subcontinent of the Americas.wikipedia
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Belize

British HondurasBelizeanBelizian
Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama.
Belize, formerly British Honduras, is a country located on the north eastern coast of Central America.

Guatemala

GuatemalanRepublic of GuatemalaGTM
Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama.
Guatemala, officially the Republic of Guatemala (República de Guatemala), is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, Belize and the Caribbean to the northeast, Honduras to the east, El Salvador to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the south.

Honduras

HonduranRepublic of HondurasHondurans
Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama.
Honduras, officially the Republic of Honduras (República de Honduras), is a country in Central America.

Nicaragua

NicaraguanRepublic of NicaraguaNIC
Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama.
Nicaragua, officially the Republic of Nicaragua, is the largest country in the Central American isthmus, bordered by Honduras to the northwest, the Caribbean to the east, Costa Rica to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest.

Panama

PanamáRepublic of PanamaPAN
Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama.
Panama (, ; Panamá ), officially the Republic of Panama (República de Panamá), is a country in Central America, bordered by Costa Rica to the west, Colombia to the southeast, the Caribbean Sea to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the south.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
Central America (América Central, Centroamérica ) is a region found in the southern tip of North America and is sometimes defined as a subcontinent of the Americas.
The United Nations formally recognizes "North America" as comprising three areas: Northern America, Central America, and The Caribbean.

Central America Volcanic Arc

Central American Volcanic ArcCentral American Volcanic Beltvolcanic activity in Central America
Due to the presence of several active geologic faults and the Central America Volcanic Arc, there is a great deal of seismic activity in the region, such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, which has resulted in death, injury and property damage.
The Central American Volcanic Arc (often abbreviated to CAVA) is a chain of volcanoes which extends parallel to the Pacific coast line of the Central American Isthmus, from Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and down to northern Panama.

Christopher Columbus

ColumbusCristoforo ColomboColón
Following the Spanish expedition of Christopher Columbus' voyages to the Americas, Spain began to colonize the Americas.
Columbus's voyages were the first European expeditions to the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

Isthmo-Colombian Area

Isthmo-Colombian
In the Pre-Columbian era, Central America was inhabited by the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica to the north and west and the Isthmo-Colombian peoples to the south and east.
It includes portions of the Central American isthmus like eastern El Salvador, eastern Honduras, Caribbean Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and northern Colombia.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
Central America (América Central, Centroamérica ) is a region found in the southern tip of North America and is sometimes defined as a subcontinent of the Americas. Following the Spanish expedition of Christopher Columbus' voyages to the Americas, Spain began to colonize the Americas.
Since the Americas extend from north to south, the climate and ecology vary widely, from the arctic tundra of Northern Canada, Greenland, and Alaska, to the tropical rain forests in Central America and South America.

Spanish colonization of the Americas

Spanish conquestSpanishSpanish colonization
Following the Spanish expedition of Christopher Columbus' voyages to the Americas, Spain began to colonize the Americas.
Beginning with the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and continuing control of vast territory for over three centuries, the Spanish Empire would expand across the Caribbean Islands, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States).

Captaincy General of Guatemala

Kingdom of GuatemalaGuatemalaCaptain General of Guatemala
From 1609 to 1821, the majority of Central American territories (except for what would become Belize and Panama, and including the modern Mexican state of Chiapas) were governed by the viceroyalty of New Spain from Mexico City as the Captaincy General of Guatemala.
The Captaincy General of Guatemala (Capitanía General de Guatemala), also known as the Kingdom of Guatemala (Spanish: Reino de Guatemala), was an administrative division of the Spanish Empire, under the viceroyalty of New Spain in Central America, including the present-day nations of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala, and the Mexican state of Chiapas.

Federal Republic of Central America

United Provinces of Central AmericaCentral American FederationCentral America
On 15 September 1821, the Act of Independence of Central America was enacted to announce Central America's separation from the Spanish Empire and provide for the establishment of a new Central American state. Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
The Federal Republic of Central America (República Federal de Centroamérica), also called the United Provinces of Central America (Provincias Unidas del Centro de América) in its first year of creation, was a sovereign state in Central America consisting of the territories of the former Captaincy General of Guatemala of New Spain.

Act of Independence of Central America

IndependenceIndependence of Central America1821 Act of Independence
On 15 September 1821, the Act of Independence of Central America was enacted to announce Central America's separation from the Spanish Empire and provide for the establishment of a new Central American state.
The Act of Independence of Central America (Acta de Independencia Centroamericana), also known as the Act of Independence of Guatemala, is the legal document by which the Provincial Council of the Province of Guatemala proclaimed the independence of Central America from the Spanish Empire and invited the other provinces of the Captaincy General of Guatemala to send envoys to a congress to decide the form of the region's independence.

Salvadorans

SalvadoranSalvadorianSalvadorean
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
Salvadorans (Spanish: Salvadoreños), also known as Salvadorians, are people who identify with El Salvador in Central America.

Costa Ricans

Costa RicanTicosCosta Rican people
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
Costa Ricans (Spanish: Costarricenses), also called Ticos, are a group of people from a multiethnic Spanish-speaking nation in Central America called Costa Rica.

Guatemalans

Guatemalan
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
Guatemalans (Spanish: Guatemaltecos) are people identified with Guatemala, a multiethnic country in Central America.

Caribbean

the CaribbeanWest IndiesWest Indian
The region is southeast of the Gulf of Mexico and the North American mainland, east of Central America, and north of South America.

Nicaraguans

NicaraguanNicaraguaethnic Nicaraguans
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
According to the UN, Nicaragua has a population of 7,243,000 (July 1, 2015) with a population growth rate of 1.31% (during the period 2005-2010) and a birth rate of 24.9/1,000 population (2005–2010), third highest in the region.

Panamanians

PanamanianPanamaPanamanian people
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
Panamanians (Spanish: Panameños) are people identified with Panama, a country in Central America, whose connection may be residential, legal, historical, or cultural.

Biodiversity hotspot

biodiversity hotspotshotspotbiodiversity hot spot
Central America is a part of the Mesoamerican biodiversity hotspot, which extends from northern Guatemala to central Panama.

Chiapas

Chiapas, MexicoChiapanState of Chiapas
From 1609 to 1821, the majority of Central American territories (except for what would become Belize and Panama, and including the modern Mexican state of Chiapas) were governed by the viceroyalty of New Spain from Mexico City as the Captaincy General of Guatemala.
However, this alliance did not last with the lowlands preferring inclusion among the new republics of Central America and the highlands annexation to Mexico.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishNueva España
From 1609 to 1821, the majority of Central American territories (except for what would become Belize and Panama, and including the modern Mexican state of Chiapas) were governed by the viceroyalty of New Spain from Mexico City as the Captaincy General of Guatemala.
At its greatest extent, the Spanish crown claimed on the mainland of the Americas much of North America south of Canada, that is: all of present-day Mexico and Central America except Panama; most of present-day United States west of the Mississippi River, plus the Floridas.

Hondurans

HonduranCatrachoHonduran people
Despite the dissolution of the Federal Republic of Central America, there is anecdotal evidence that demonstrates that Nicaraguans, Hondurans, Costa Ricans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Panamanians continue to maintain a Central American identity.
The term was coined by Nicaraguans in the mid-19th century when Honduran General Florencio Xatruch returned from battle with his Honduras and El Salvador soldiers after defeating American freebooters commanded by William Walker, whose purpose was to re-establish slavery and take over all of Central America.

United Nations geoscheme for the Americas

Latin America and the CaribbeanLatin AmericaLatAm&Car
Note that the continent of North America comprises the intermediate regions of Northern America, Caribbean, and Central America.