It preceded the Office for National Statistics.

- Central Statistical Office (United Kingdom)

The ONS was formed on 1 April 1996 by the merger of the Central Statistical Office (CSO) and the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS).

- Office for National Statistics

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Registrar-General's Office, Sydney Australia (1872)

Office of Population Censuses and Surveys

Created in May 1970 through the merger of the General Register Office and the Government Social Survey Department.

Created in May 1970 through the merger of the General Register Office and the Government Social Survey Department.

Registrar-General's Office, Sydney Australia (1872)

It was a forerunner and constituent, with the UK Central Statistical Office, of the Office for National Statistics, in which they combined in 1996 under a single director who, from 2000 was also known as the National Statistician.

Civil Knight Grand Cross Star of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath

Tim Holt (statistician)

British statistician who is Professor Emeritus of Social Statistics at the University of Southampton.

British statistician who is Professor Emeritus of Social Statistics at the University of Southampton.

Civil Knight Grand Cross Star of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath

He was formerly the president of the Royal Statistical Society (2005–07), the last director of the Central Statistical Office of the United Kingdom, and the first director of the Office for National Statistics (and ex-officio Registrar General).

Government Statistical Service

Community of all civil servants in the United Kingdom who work in the collection, production and communication of official statistics.

Community of all civil servants in the United Kingdom who work in the collection, production and communication of official statistics.

Members of the GSS work in the Office for National Statistics, most UK Government departments, and the devolved administrations.

The GSS was formed in 1968, in response to a series of recommendations made by Claus Moser, director of the Central Statistical Office, who recognised that 'society was going through radical changes, and social and economic policy was being made on incorrect and out of date statistics.