Central tendency

LocalityLocality (statistics)Measure of central tendencycentral locationcentral pointcentral tendenciescentral valuecentralitylocationlocation and scale measures
In statistics, a central tendency (or measure of central tendency) is a central or typical value for a probability distribution.wikipedia
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Statistics

statisticalstatistical analysisstatistician
In statistics, a central tendency (or measure of central tendency) is a central or typical value for a probability distribution.
Descriptive statistics are most often concerned with two sets of properties of a distribution (sample or population): central tendency (or location) seeks to characterize the distribution's central or typical value, while dispersion (or variability) characterizes the extent to which members of the distribution depart from its center and each other.

Median

averagesample medianmedian-unbiased estimator
The most common measures of central tendency are the arithmetic mean, the median and the mode.
The median is 2 in this case, (as is the mode), and it might be seen as a better indication of central tendency (less susceptible to the exceptionally large value in data) than the arithmetic mean of 4.

Average

Rushing averageReceiving averagemean
Colloquially, measures of central tendency are often called averages. The term central tendency dates from the late 1920s.
In statistics, mean, median, and mode are all known as measures of central tendency, and in colloquial usage any of these might be called an average value.

Statistical dispersion

dispersionvariabilityspread
The central tendency of a distribution is typically contrasted with its dispersion or variability; dispersion and central tendency are the often characterized properties of distributions.
Dispersion is contrasted with location or central tendency, and together they are the most used properties of distributions.

Arithmetic mean

meanaveragearithmetic
The most common measures of central tendency are the arithmetic mean, the median and the mode.
While the arithmetic mean is often used to report central tendencies, it is not a robust statistic, meaning that it is greatly influenced by outliers (values that are very much larger or smaller than most of the values).

Level of measurement

quantitativelevels of measurementscale
The mode, i.e. the most common item, is allowed as the measure of central tendency for the nominal type.

Interquartile mean

interquartile
The interquartile mean (IQM) (or midmean) is a statistical measure of central tendency based on the truncated mean of the interquartile range.

Mid-range

Midrangemidsummaryhalf-range
The mid-range is the midpoint of the range; as such, it is a measure of central tendency.

Geometric median

Weiszfeld's algorithmminimizing the sum of distances
This generalizes the median, which has the property of minimizing the sum of distances for one-dimensional data, and provides a central tendency in higher dimensions.

Winsorized mean

A winsorized mean is a winsorized statistical measure of central tendency, much like the mean and median, and even more similar to the truncated mean.

Simplicial depth

In robust statistics and computational geometry, simplicial depth is a measure of central tendency determined by the simplices that contain a given point.

Lp space

L'' ''p'' spaceL ''p'' spacesL'' ''p'' spaces
In the sense of L p spaces, the correspondence is:
In statistics, measures of central tendency and statistical dispersion, such as the mean, median, and standard deviation, are defined in terms of L p metrics, and measures of central tendency can be characterized as solutions to variational problems.

Interquartile range

inter-quartile rangebelowinterquartile
The median is the corresponding measure of central tendency.

Mean

mean valueaveragepopulation mean
In probability and statistics, the population mean, or expected value, is a measure of the central tendency either of a probability distribution or of the random variable characterized by that distribution.

Mode (statistics)

modemodalmodes
The most common measures of central tendency are the arithmetic mean, the median and the mode.

Average absolute deviation

mean absolute deviationMaximum absolute deviationmean deviation
In the general form, the central point can be the mean, median, mode, or the result of any other measure of central tendency or any random data point related to the given data set.

Deviation (statistics)

deviationAbsolute deviationdeviations
Typically the deviation is reckoned from the central value, being construed as some type of average, most often the median or sometimes the mean of the data set.

Frequency distribution

distributionfrequency tabledistributions
A simple example of this is for the center of nominal data: instead of using the mode (the only single-valued "center"), one often uses the empirical measure (the frequency distribution divided by the sample size) as a "center".
This assessment involves measures of central tendency or averages, such as the mean and median, and measures of variability or statistical dispersion, such as the standard deviation or variance.

Calculus of variations

variationalvariational calculusvariational methods
Several measures of central tendency can be characterized as solving a variational problem, in the sense of the calculus of variations, namely minimizing variation from the center.

Probability distribution

distributioncontinuous probability distributiondiscrete probability distribution
In statistics, a central tendency (or measure of central tendency) is a central or typical value for a probability distribution.

Normal distribution

normally distributedGaussian distributionnormal
A middle tendency can be calculated for either a finite set of values or for a theoretical distribution, such as the normal distribution.

Data

statistical datascientific datadatum
Occasionally authors use central tendency to denote "the tendency of quantitative data to cluster around some central value."