A report on Centreville, Virginia

Main street and church guarded by Union soldiers, Centreville, Virginia, May 1862 (#302 Photograph by Civil War photographers George N. Barnard and James F. Gibson)
"Departure from the old Homestead" Pro-union refugees, Centreville, Virginia, 1862 (#306 Photograph by George N. Barnard)
Location of Centreville, Virginia
US 29 in Centreville
Centreville Regional Library

Census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The population was 74,230 at the 2020 census.

- Centreville, Virginia

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Fairfax County, Virginia

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County in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

County in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Piney Branch Mill, southeast of Fairfax city, Historic American Buildings Survey
CIA headquarters in Langley
Map of battles on Bull Run, near Manassas, on the line of Fairfax & Prince William Counties, in Virginia, fought between the forces of the Confederate States and of the United States of America: Generals Beauregard and Johnston commanding the Confederate and General McDowell the United States forces, on July 21, 1861, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Children play frisbee baseball at one of Fairfax County's elementary schools
Fairfax County is, along with Washington, a "core" employment jurisdiction of the Washington Metropolitan Area as indicated by this map. A U.S. Department of Labor study published in 2007 described Fairfax County as the second "economic pillar" of the Washington-area economy, along with the District of Columbia. The county has been described in Time as "one of the great economic success stories of our time."
I-95 in Fairfax County
Falls Church Airpark, circa 1950. The road at the top of the photo is U.S. Route 50 (Arlington Blvd).
Map of Fairfax County showing incorporated towns and CDPs
Herndon
McLean
Reston

As of the 2000 census, Fairfax County's 13 largest communities are all unincorporated CDPs, the largest of which are Centreville, Reston, and McLean, each with a population over 45,000.

Chantilly, Virginia

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Census-designated place in western Fairfax County, Virginia, United States.

Census-designated place in western Fairfax County, Virginia, United States.

During the Civil War, Chantilly stretched to the intersection of West Ox Road and Monument Drive, shown in this original map of the Battle of Chantilly at the "GAP" between the two railroad grades to the immediate southeast of "A.P. Hill"
The Walney Visitor Center at Ellanor C. Lawrence Park
National Reconnaissance Office at night
Historic marker commemorating Old Chantilly Farm House
alt=FallHouse.JPG|Sully Plantation (Sully Historic Site) Main House
The Stone House. The only building of the former Chantilly Plantation (not to be confused with the Sully Plantation) that still exists today. It is located on the north side of Route 50, across from the Greenbriar Shopping Center. Historical evidence strongly suggests the Stone House was an overseer's quarters before the Civil War, and became a tavern later.

It is located between Centreville to the south, Herndon and Reston to the north and northeast, respectively, and Fairfax 7 mi to the southeast.

SR 28 northbound in Bealeton

Virginia State Route 28

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Primary state highway that traverses the counties of Loudoun, Fairfax, Prince William, and Fauquier in the U.S. state of Virginia.

Primary state highway that traverses the counties of Loudoun, Fairfax, Prince William, and Fauquier in the U.S. state of Virginia.

SR 28 northbound in Bealeton
View south along SR 28 from Air and Space Museum Parkway on the border of Oak Hill and Chantilly
SR 28 southbound at the Innovation Avenue exit in Dulles
SR 28 southbound at the US 50 interchange in Chantilly
View south along SR 28 from Air and Space Museum Parkway on the border of Oak Hill and Chantilly

From thereon to Centreville in Fairfax County, the road is called Centreville Road.

Accotink Creek crossing at the tripoint of Annandale, West Springfield, and North Springfield

Virginia State Route 620 (Fairfax and Loudoun Counties)

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Secondary state highway.

Secondary state highway.

Accotink Creek crossing at the tripoint of Annandale, West Springfield, and North Springfield
Braddock Road where it forms the border of North Springfield

The entire length of SR 620 is also known as Braddock Road (except for a small section in Centreville called Spindle Court).

General Kearny's gallant charge

Battle of Chantilly

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The Battle of Chantilly (or Ox Hill, the Confederate name) took place on September 1, 1862, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as the concluding battle of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

The Battle of Chantilly (or Ox Hill, the Confederate name) took place on September 1, 1862, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as the concluding battle of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

General Kearny's gallant charge
Map of the battle
The death of General Kearny
Ox Hill Battlefield Park, with monuments to Stevens and Kearny

Defeated in the Second Battle of Bull Run on August 30, Union Maj. Gen. John Pope ordered his Army of Virginia to retreat to Centreville.

Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

Second Battle of Bull Run

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Fought August 28–30, 1862, in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War.

Fought August 28–30, 1862, in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War.

Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Pope's retreat to Centreville was nonetheless precipitous.

Centreville High School (Fairfax County, Virginia)

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Centreville High School
Josh Mosier and other football players commiserate after a 1998 defeat. This photo by Robert Benson, titled Numb After Loss, won second place in the Sports category in the Military Photographer of the Year competition.

Centreville High School (CVHS) is a public high school located in unincorporated southwestern Fairfax County, Virginia, United States, north of the town of Clifton and east of the Centreville CDP.

First Battle of Bull Run.
Chromolithograph by Kurz & Allison, 1889

First Battle of Bull Run

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The first major battle of the American Civil War.

The first major battle of the American Civil War.

First Battle of Bull Run.
Chromolithograph by Kurz & Allison, 1889
First Battle of Bull Run. Chromolithograph by Kurz & Allison, 1889.
The exotically-dressed troops in the foreground were the Zouaves from the 11th New York Infantry Regiment; the cavalries charging them were Colonel J. E. B. Stuart's 1st Virginia Cavalry.
Virginia (1861)
Northeastern Virginia (1861)
Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, General in Chief, USA
Cartoon map illustrating Gen. Winfield Scott's plan to crush the Confederacy, economically. It is sometimes called the "Anaconda plan".
Movements July 16–21, 1861
Situation July 18
Battlefield of Manassas
Situation morning, July 21
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U.S. cavalry at Sudley Spring Ford
An 1862 illustration of a Confederate officer forcing slaves to fire a cannon at U.S. forces at gunpoint. According to John Parker, a former slave, he was forced by his Confederate captors to fire a cannon at U.S. soldiers at the Battle of Bull Run.
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Attacks on Henry House Hill, 1–3 p.m
Union retreat, after 4 p.m.
Ruins of Judith Henry's house, "Spring Hill", after the battle
Postwar house on site of Judith Henry house in Manassas
Judith Henry grave
Capture of Ricketts' Battery, painting by Sidney E. King, National Park Service
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The National Jubilee of Peace building at Grant and Lee avenues in Manassas, Virginia, is draped with the U.S. flag for the 150th anniversary commemoration, held on July 21, 2011, of the First Battle of Bull Run.
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After two days of marching slowly in the sweltering heat, the Union army was allowed to rest in Centreville.

Centreville Military Railroad trestle bridge on Bull Run, destroyed on March 11, 1862

Centreville Military Railroad

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Centreville Military Railroad trestle bridge on Bull Run, destroyed on March 11, 1862
Main street, Centreville, VA. May 1862

The Centreville Military Railroad was a 5.5 mi spur running from the Orange and Alexandria Railroad east of Manassas Junction across Bull Run and up the south side of the Centreville Plateau.

Chris Beatty

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American football assistant coach.

American football assistant coach.

Christopher Beatty was born in 1973 in Topeka, Kansas, but grew up in Centreville, Virginia.