A report on CentrosomeTubulinMicrotubule and Centriole

The structure of the centrosome
kif1a head-microtubule complex structure in atp-form
Microtubule and tubulin metrics
Cross-section of a centriole showing its microtubule triplets.
The generalized structure and molecular components of a cell
Tubulin and microtubule metrics
Microtubules are one of the cytoskeletal filament systems in eukaryotic cells. The microtubule cytoskeleton is involved in the transport of material within cells, carried out by motor proteins that move on the surface of the microtubule.
A mother and daughter centriole, attached orthogonally
Role of the centrosome in cell cycle progression
Comparison of the architectures of a 5-protofilament bacterial microtubule (left; BtubA in dark blue; BtubB in light-blue) and a 13-protofilament eukaryotic microtubule (right; α-tubulin in white; β-tubulin in black). Seams and start-helices are indicated in green and red, respectively.
Cartoon representation of the structure of α(yellow)/β(red)-tubulin heterodimer, GTP and GDP.
3D rendering of centrioles
Centrosome (shown by arrow) next to nucleus
β-tubulin in Tetrahymena sp.
Components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin filaments are shown in red, microtubules are in green, and the nuclei are in blue. The cystoskeleton provides the cell with an inner framework and enables it to move and change shape.
Electron micrograph of a centriole from a mouse embryo.
Γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC)
Image of a fibroblast cell containing fluorescently labeled actin (red) and microtubules (green).
A cytoplasmic dynein motor bound to a microtubule.
A kinesin molecule bound to a microtubule.
A 3D diagram of a centriole. Each circle represents one microtubule. In total there are 27 microtubules organized into 9 bundles of 3.
This diagram depicts the organization of a typical mitotic spindle found in animal cells. Shown here are the three main types of microtubules during mitosis and how they are oriented in the cell and the mitotic spindle.

Microtubules are polymers of tubulin that form part of the cytoskeleton and provide structure and shape to eukaryotic cells.

- Microtubule

In cell biology a centriole is a cylindrical organelle composed mainly of a protein called tubulin.

- Centriole

α- and β-tubulins polymerize into microtubules, a major component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton.

- Tubulin

A bound pair of centrioles, surrounded by a highly ordered mass of dense material, called the pericentriolar material (PCM), makes up a structure called a centrosome.

- Centriole

Centrioles are typically made up of nine sets of short microtubule triplets, arranged in a cylinder.

- Centriole

Centrosomes are composed of two centrioles arranged at right angles to each other, and surrounded by a dense, highly structured mass of protein termed the pericentriolar material (PCM).

- Centrosome

The PCM contains proteins responsible for microtubule nucleation and anchoring — including γ-tubulin, pericentrin and ninein.

- Centrosome

Microtubules are nucleated and organized by microtubule-organizing centres, such as the centrosome found in the center of many animal cells or the basal bodies of cilia and flagella, or the spindle pole bodies found in most fungi.

- Microtubule

During mitosis, the nuclear membrane breaks down, and the centrosome-nucleated microtubules can interact with the chromosomes to build the mitotic spindle.

- Centrosome

It is found primarily in centrosomes and spindle pole bodies, since these are the areas of most abundant microtubule nucleation.

- Tubulin

Delta (δ) and epsilon (ε) tubulin have been found to localize at centrioles and may play a role in centriole structure and function, though neither is as well-studied as the α- and β- forms.

- Tubulin

Each centrosome is made up of two cylinders called centrioles, oriented at right angles to each other.

- Microtubule
The structure of the centrosome

1 related topic with Alpha

Overall

Mitosis in an animal cell (phases ordered counter-clockwise).

Mitosis

0 links

Part of the cell cycle in which replicated chromosomes are separated into two new nuclei.

Part of the cell cycle in which replicated chromosomes are separated into two new nuclei.

Mitosis in an animal cell (phases ordered counter-clockwise).
Mitosis divides the chromosomes in a cell nucleus.
Label-free live cell imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells undergoing mitosis
Onion (Allium) cells in different phases of the cell cycle enlarged 800 diameters.
a. non-dividing cells
b. nuclei preparing for division (spireme-stage)
c. dividing cells showing mitotic figures
e. pair of daughter-cells shortly after division
Stages of early mitosis in a vertebrate cell with micrographs of chromatids
Condensing chromosomes. Interphase nucleus (left), condensing chromosomes (middle) and condensed chromosomes (right).
Prophase during mitosis
A cell in late metaphase. All chromosomes (blue) but one have arrived at the metaphase plate.
Metaphase during Mitosis
Anaphase during Mitosis
Telophase during mitosis
Cytokinesis illustration
Cilliate undergoing cytokinesis, with the cleavage furrow being clearly visible
An abnormal (tripolar) mitosis (12 o'clock position) in a precancerous lesion of the stomach (H&E stain)
Mitosis appearances in breast cancer
Cell shape changes through mitosis for a typical animal cell cultured on a flat surface. The cell undergoes mitotic cell rounding during spindle assembly and then divides via cytokinesis. The actomyosin cortex is depicted in red, DNA/chromosomes purple, microtubules green, and membrane and retraction fibers in black. Rounding also occurs in live tissue, as described in the text.
Some types of cell division in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
closed intranuclear pleuromitosis
closed extranuclear pleuromitosis
closed orthomitosis
semiopen pleuromitosis
semiopen orthomitosis
open orthomitosis
Normal and atypical forms of mitosis in cancer cells. A, normal mitosis; B, chromatin bridge; C, multipolar mitosis; D, ring mitosis; E, dispersed mitosis; F, asymmetrical mitosis; G, lag-type mitosis; and H, micronuclei. H&E stain.

Microtubules project from opposite ends of the cell, attach to the centromeres, and align the chromosomes centrally within the cell.

The cells of higher plants (such as the flowering plants) lack centrioles; instead, microtubules form a spindle on the surface of the nucleus and are then organized into a spindle by the chromosomes themselves, after the nuclear envelope breaks down.

Close to the nucleus of animal cells are structures called centrosomes, consisting of a pair of centrioles surrounded by a loose collection of proteins.

The two centrosomes polymerize tubulin to help form a microtubule spindle apparatus.