Cereal

graincerealsgrainscorncereal grainscornfieldcereal graingrain cropscereal cropscereal crop
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.wikipedia
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Poaceae

grassturfgrass family
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
Poaceae includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns and pasture.

Cereal germ

germwheat germwheatgerm
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
The germ of a cereal is the reproductive part that germinates to grow into a plant; it is the embryo of the seed.

Bran

rice branwheat branoat bran
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
Bran, also known as miller's bran, is the hard outer layers of cereal grain.

Grain

grainsfood grainfood grains
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop and are therefore staple crops.
The two main types of commercial grain crops are cereals and legumes.

Whole grain

whole wheatwhole-grainwhole grains
In their natural, unprocessed, whole grain form, cereals are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, oils, and protein.
A whole grain, also called a wholegrain, is a grain of any cereal and pseudocereal that contains the endosperm, germ, and bran, in contrast to refined grains, which retain only the endosperm.

Pseudocereal

pseudocerealsgrain-likegrain
Edible grains from other plant families, such as buckwheat (Polygonaceae), quinoa (Amaranthaceae) and chia (Lamiaceae), are referred to as pseudocereals.
A pseudocereal is one of any non-grasses that are used in much the same way as cereals (true cereals are grasses).

Fruit

fruitsseed podfruiting
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
Botanically, a cereal grain, such as corn, rice, or wheat, is also a kind of fruit, termed a caryopsis.

Staple food

staplestaplesstaple crop
Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop and are therefore staple crops.
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.

Wheat

cornTriticumdwarf wheat
In some developing countries, grain in the form of rice, wheat, millet, or maize constitutes a majority of daily sustenance.
Wheat is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.

Millet

milletsglutinous milletKodo
In some developing countries, grain in the form of rice, wheat, millet, or maize constitutes a majority of daily sustenance.
Millets (/ˈmɪlɪts/) are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown around the world as cereal crops or grains for fodder and human food.

Ceres (mythology)

Ceresthe Roman goddess of agriculturegoddess Ceres
The word cereal is derived from Ceres, the Roman goddess of harvest and agriculture.
In ancient Roman religion, Ceres ( Cerēs ) was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships.

Agriculture

farmingagriculturalagriculturist
Agriculture allowed for the support of an increased population, leading to larger societies and eventually the development of cities.
Classes of foods include cereals (grains), vegetables, fruits, oils, meat, milk, fungi and eggs.

Neolithic

Neolithic periodNeolithic AgeNeolithic era
Early Neolithic villages show evidence of the development of processing grain.
Following the ASPRO chronology, the Neolithic arises at 10,200 BC in the Levant, arising from the Natufian culture, where pioneering use of wild cereals evolved into early farming.

Maize

corncorn (maize)Zea mays
In some developing countries, grain in the form of rice, wheat, millet, or maize constitutes a majority of daily sustenance.
The word "corn" outside North America, Australia, and New Zealand refers to any cereal crop, its meaning understood to vary geographically to refer to the local staple.

Buckwheat

buckwheat flourLargest buckwheat producerbuck wheat
Edible grains from other plant families, such as buckwheat (Polygonaceae), quinoa (Amaranthaceae) and chia (Lamiaceae), are referred to as pseudocereals.
However, since buckwheat is not a cereal, it is considered acceptable for consumption during Hindu fasting days.

Domestication

domesticateddomesticdomesticate
The first cereal grains were domesticated by early primitive humans.
The domestication of plants began at least 12,000 years ago with cereals in the Middle East, and the bottle gourd in Asia.

Winnowing

winnowwinnowing machinewinnowing fan
In developed countries, cereal crops are universally machine-harvested, typically using a combine harvester, which cuts, threshes, and winnows the grain during a single pass across the field.
Wind winnowing is an agricultural method developed by ancient cultures for separating grain from chaff.

Annual plant

annualannualsannual plants
Most are annual plants; consequently one planting yields one harvest.
In cultivation, many food plants are, or are grown as, annuals, including virtually all domesticated grains.

Caryopsis

caryopsesgrainscaryopes
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
The term grain is also used in a more general sense as synonymous with cereal (as in "cereal grains", which include some non-Poaceae).

Malt

malted barleymalt extractbarley malt
Malt is germinated cereal grains that have been dried in a process known as "malting".

Endosperm

albuminousexalbuminouskernel
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.
Cereal crops are grown for their edible fruit (grains or caryopses), which are primarily endosperm.

Oat

oatsaveninAvena sativa
The oat (Avena sativa), sometimes called the common oat, is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural, unlike other cereals and pseudocereals).

Neolithic founder crops

founder crops9000-8000 BCancient grain legume crop
Emmer wheat, einkorn wheat, and barley were three of the so-called Neolithic founder crops in the development of agriculture.
They consist of flax, three cereals and four pulses, and are the first known domesticated plants in the world.

Sorghum

broomcornJawarmilo
Other warm climate cereals, such as sorghum, are adapted to arid conditions.
S. bicolor is an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia, and is the fifth-most important cereal crop grown in the world.

Teff

tefE. tefferagrostis tef
Teff, an ancient grain that is a staple in Ethiopia. It is high in fiber and protein. Its flour is often used to make injera. It can also be eaten as a warm breakfast cereal similar to farina with a chocolate or nutty flavor. Its flour and whole grain products can usually be found in natural foods stores.
Eragrostis tef is an annual cereal grass belonging to the family of the Poaceae.