Cerebral arteriovenous malformation

arteriovenous malformationsintracranial arteriovenous malformationscerebral AVMabnormal vascular structurearteriovenous malformationAVMbrain AVMcerebral AVMsvascular malformations
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.wikipedia
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Arteriovenous malformation

arteriovenous malformationsAVMAVMs
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.
This vascular anomaly is widely known because of its occurrence in the central nervous system (usually cerebral AVM), but can appear in any location.

Headache

headacheschronic headacheheadach
The most frequently observed problems, related to an AVM, are headaches and seizures, backaches, neckaches and eventual nausea, as the coagulated blood makes its way down to be dissolved in the individual's spinal fluid.
Headaches caused by cranial or cervical vascular disorders such as ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack, non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, vascular malformations or arteritis are also defined as secondary headaches.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

subarachnoid haemorrhagesubarachnoidsubarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic
If a rupture or bleeding incident occurs, the blood may penetrate either into the brain tissue (cerebral hemorrhage) or into the subarachnoid space, which is located between the sheaths (meninges) surrounding the brain (subarachnoid hemorrhage).
SAH in a person known to have seizures is often diagnostic of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

HHTtelangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagicBabington disease
There is a significant preponderance (15-20%) of AVM in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome).
Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs, larger vascular malformations) occur in larger organs, predominantly the lungs (50%), liver (30–70%) and the brain (cerebral AVMs, 10%), with a very small proportion (

Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.

Human brain

brainbrain tissuebrains
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.

Cerebrum

cerebraltelencephalontelencephalic
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.

Epileptic seizure

seizureseizuresepileptic seizures
The most frequently observed problems, related to an AVM, are headaches and seizures, backaches, neckaches and eventual nausea, as the coagulated blood makes its way down to be dissolved in the individual's spinal fluid.

Weakness

astheniamuscular weaknessphysical weakness
Other common symptoms are a pulsing noise in the head, progressive weakness and numbness and vision changes as well as debilitating, excruciating pain.

Hypoesthesia

numbnesshypesthesiahypoaesthesia
Other common symptoms are a pulsing noise in the head, progressive weakness and numbness and vision changes as well as debilitating, excruciating pain.

Intracranial hemorrhage

intracranial bleedingintracranial haemorrhageintracranial hematoma
In serious cases, the blood vessels rupture and there is bleeding within the brain (intracranial hemorrhage).

Urinary incontinence

incontinenceurinaryincontinent
Symptoms due to bleeding include loss of consciousness, sudden and severe headache, nausea, vomiting, incontinence, and blurred vision, amongst others.

Hemiparesis

hemiplegiahemiplegicweakness of half the body
Impairments caused by local brain tissue damage on the bleed site are also possible, including seizure, one-sided weakness (hemiparesis), a loss of touch sensation on one side of the body and deficits in language processing (aphasia).

Aphasia

aphasicdysphasiaaphasics
Impairments caused by local brain tissue damage on the bleed site are also possible, including seizure, one-sided weakness (hemiparesis), a loss of touch sensation on one side of the body and deficits in language processing (aphasia).

Cerebrospinal fluid

cerebral spinal fluidCSFspinal fluid
AVMs in certain critical locations may stop the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid, causing accumulation of the fluid within the skull and giving rise to a clinical condition called hydrocephalus.

Hydrocephalus

hydrocephalyhydrocephaliccongenital hydrocephalus
AVMs in certain critical locations may stop the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid, causing accumulation of the fluid within the skull and giving rise to a clinical condition called hydrocephalus.

Prenatal development

prenatalfetal developmentperinatal
Arteriovenous malformations are most commonly of prenatal origin.

Oxygen

OO 2 molecular oxygen
In a normal brain oxygen enriched blood from the heart travels in sequence through smaller blood vessels going from arteries, to arterioles and then capillaries.

Arteriole

arteriolesarteriolararterial
In a normal brain oxygen enriched blood from the heart travels in sequence through smaller blood vessels going from arteries, to arterioles and then capillaries.

Capillary

capillariescapillary bedcapillary system
In a normal brain oxygen enriched blood from the heart travels in sequence through smaller blood vessels going from arteries, to arterioles and then capillaries.

Venule

venulesvenulavenular
After the oxygen is removed blood reaches venules and later veins which will take it back to the heart and lungs.

Neuroimaging

brain imagingbrain scanbrain scanning
An AVM diagnosis is established by neuroimaging studies after a complete neurological and physical examination.

CT scan

computed tomographyCTcomputerized tomography
Three main techniques are used to visualize the brain and search for AVM: computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography.

Magnetic resonance imaging

MRImagnetic resonance imaging (MRI)magnetic resonance
Three main techniques are used to visualize the brain and search for AVM: computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography.