Ceremonial counties of England

ceremonial countyCountyceremonialceremonial countiesceremonial purposescountiesceremonially associatedceremoniallyList of ceremonial counties of Englandceremonial county boundaries
The Counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies, informally known as ceremonial counties, also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England, are areas of England to which a lord-lieutenant is appointed.wikipedia
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Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England

administrativenon-metropolitan countynon-metropolitan
Legally, the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as "counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies in Great Britain", in contrast to the areas used for local government.
As originally constituted, the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties each consisted of multiple districts, had a county council and were also the counties for the purposes of Lieutenancies.

Counties of England

English countycountyEnglish counties
They are also informally known as "geographic counties", to distinguish them from other types of counties of England.
These newly created areas are called ceremonial counties and are based on, but not always the same as, the areas of the 1972 administrative counties.

Northamptonshire

NorthantsCounty of NorthamptonNorthamptonshire, England
An administrative county comprised all of the county apart from the county boroughs; also, some traditional subdivisions of counties were constituted administrative counties, for instance the Soke of Peterborough in Northamptonshire and the Isle of Ely in Cambridgeshire.
The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils.

County of London

LondonInner LondonLondon boroughs
The greatest change was the creation of the County of London, which was made both an administrative county and a "county"; it included parts of the historic counties of Middlesex, Kent, and Surrey.
However, the City of London and the County of London formed separate ceremonial counties for "non-administrative" purposes.

Administrative county

administrative countiesadministrativecounties for administrative purposes
It created new entities called "administrative counties".
They are now abolished, although in Northern Ireland their former areas are used as the basis for lieutenancy.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The Counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies, informally known as ceremonial counties, also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England, are areas of England to which a lord-lieutenant is appointed.
Below the regional level, all of England is divided into 48 ceremonial counties.

Yorkshire

Yorkshire, EnglandCounty of YorkYorkshireman
The distinction between a county for purposes of the lieutenancy and a county for administrative purposes is not a new one; in some cases, a county corporate that was part of a county was appointed its own lieutenant (although the lieutenant of the containing county would often be appointed to this position, as well), and the three Ridings of Yorkshire had been treated as three counties for lieutenancy purposes since the 17th century.
This region includes a northern slice of Lincolnshire, but does not include the northern part of the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire (Middlesbrough and Redcar and Cleveland), which is in the North East England region.

Hampshire

County of SouthamptonHampshire, EnglandCounty of Hampshire
For example, the administrative counties of East Suffolk and West Suffolk, along with the county borough of Ipswich, were considered to make up a single ceremonial county of Suffolk, and the administrative county of the Isle of Wight was part of the ceremonial county of Hampshire.
The Isle of Wight, historically part of Hampshire, became a separate ceremonial county in 1974.

Isle of Wight

IOWWightIsland
For example, the administrative counties of East Suffolk and West Suffolk, along with the county borough of Ipswich, were considered to make up a single ceremonial county of Suffolk, and the administrative county of the Isle of Wight was part of the ceremonial county of Hampshire.
It continued to share the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire until 1974, when it was made its own ceremonial county.

Oxfordshire

County of OxfordOxfordshire, EnglandCounty of Oxfordshire
Apart from minor boundary revisions (for example, Caversham, a town in Oxfordshire, becoming part of Reading county borough and thus of Berkshire, in 1911), these areas changed little until the 1965 creation of Greater London and of Huntingdon and Peterborough, which resulted in the abolition of the offices of Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, Lord Lieutenant of the County of London, and Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire and the creation of the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London and of the Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdon and Peterborough.
The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west.

Berkshire

Berkshire, EnglandCounty of BerkshireRoyal County of Berkshire
Apart from minor boundary revisions (for example, Caversham, a town in Oxfordshire, becoming part of Reading county borough and thus of Berkshire, in 1911), these areas changed little until the 1965 creation of Greater London and of Huntingdon and Peterborough, which resulted in the abolition of the offices of Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, Lord Lieutenant of the County of London, and Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire and the creation of the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London and of the Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdon and Peterborough.
Berkshire is a county of historic origin, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council.

Local Government Act 1888

Local Government Act18891888
The Local Government Act 1888 established county councils to assume the administrative functions of Quarter Sessions in the counties.
The non-administrative purposes were stated to be "sheriff, lieutenant, custos rotulorum, justices, militia, coroner, or other", thus approximating to the functions of modern ceremonial counties.

Reading, Berkshire

ReadingReading, EnglandReading, United Kingdom
Apart from minor boundary revisions (for example, Caversham, a town in Oxfordshire, becoming part of Reading county borough and thus of Berkshire, in 1911), these areas changed little until the 1965 creation of Greater London and of Huntingdon and Peterborough, which resulted in the abolition of the offices of Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex, Lord Lieutenant of the County of London, and Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire and the creation of the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London and of the Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdon and Peterborough.
For ceremonial purposes the town is in the county of Berkshire and has served as its county town since 1867, previously sharing this status with Abingdon-on-Thames.

Avon (county)

Avoncounty of AvonAvon County Council
Following a further rearrangement in 1996, Avon, Cleveland, Hereford and Worcester, and Humberside were abolished.
Avon was a non-metropolitan and ceremonial county in the west of England that existed between 1974 and 1996.

Humberside

Humberside, EnglandCounty of HumbersideHUM
Following a further rearrangement in 1996, Avon, Cleveland, Hereford and Worcester, and Humberside were abolished.
Humberside was a non-metropolitan and ceremonial county in Northern England from 1 April 1974 until 1 April 1996.

Somerset

SomersetshireSomerset, EnglandCounty of Somerset
The County of Avon that had been formed in 1974 was mostly split between Gloucestershire and Somerset, but its city of Bristol regained the status of a county in itself, which it had lost upon the formation of Avon.
Somerset ( or locally ; archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west.

Bristol

Bristol, EnglandCity of BristolBristol, UK
The County of Avon that had been formed in 1974 was mostly split between Gloucestershire and Somerset, but its city of Bristol regained the status of a county in itself, which it had lost upon the formation of Avon.
Bristol is a city and county in South West England with a population of 463,400.

North Yorkshire

NorthNorth Yorkshire, EnglandYorkshire
Cleveland was partitioned between North Yorkshire and Durham.
North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county (or shire county) and the largest ceremonial county in England by area.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East YorkshireEast RidingYorkshire
Humberside was split between Lincolnshire and a new ceremonial county of East Riding of Yorkshire.
The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is an area in Northern England and can refer either to the administrative county (Local Government Area) of the East Riding of Yorkshire which is a unitary authority, to the ceremonial county (Lieutenancy) of the East Riding of Yorkshire or to the easternmost of the three subdivisions (ridings) of the traditional county of Yorkshire.

Lincolnshire

County of LincolnLincolnshire, EnglandLincs.
Humberside was split between Lincolnshire and a new ceremonial county of East Riding of Yorkshire.
The ceremonial county of Lincolnshire is composed of the non-metropolitan county of Lincolnshire and the area covered by the unitary authorities of North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire.

Herefordshire

County of HerefordshireHerefordCounty of Hereford
Hereford and Worcester was divided into the restored counties of Herefordshire and Worcestershire.
Situated in the historic Welsh Marches, Herefordshire is one of the most rural and sparsely populated counties in England, with a population density of 82/km² (212/sq mi), and a 2017 population of 191,000 - the fourth-smallest of any ceremonial county in England.

Gloucestershire

County of GloucesterGloucestershire, EnglandGlos.
The County of Avon that had been formed in 1974 was mostly split between Gloucestershire and Somerset, but its city of Bristol regained the status of a county in itself, which it had lost upon the formation of Avon.
Upon the abolition of Avon in 1996, the region north of Bristol became a unitary authority area of South Gloucestershire and is now part of the ceremonial county of Gloucestershire.

Rutland

County of RutlandRutlandshireRutland, England
Rutland was restored as a ceremonial county.
Among the current ceremonial counties, the Isle of Wight, City of London and City of Bristol are smaller in area.

List of shrievalties

Sheriff of NorwichSherifflist here
In present-day England, the ceremonial counties correspond to the shrieval counties, each with a high sheriff appointed (except the City of London, which has its two sheriffs).
The areas covered are the ceremonial counties of England, the preserved counties of Wales, and the administrative counties and county boroughs of Northern Ireland.

Bedfordshire

County of BedfordBedfordshire, EnglandBedford
It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton.