Cesar Chavez

César ChávezCesar E. ChavezCesar ChávezCésar E. ChávezCesar Estrada ChavezCésar ChavezCésar Estrada ChávezFarmworker Educational Radio Network(Cesar) ChavezAmerican labor leader and civil rights activist of the same name
Cesar Chavez (born César Estrada Chávez, ; March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was an American labor leader and Latino American civil rights activist.wikipedia
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Dolores Huerta

Dolores Clara HuertaDolores Huerta (1930)
Along with Dolores Huerta, he co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, later renamed the United Farm Workers (UFW) union.
Dolores Clara Fernández Huerta (born April 10, 1930) is an American labor leader and civil rights activist who, with Cesar Chavez, is a co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers (UFW).

List of places named after Cesar Chavez

institutions that was named after Cesar Chavezmany schools, streets, and parks being named after him
During his lifetime, Colegio Cesar Chavez was one of the few institutions named in his honor, but after his death he became a major historical icon for the Latino community, with many schools, streets, and parks being named after him.
The following is a list of places named after Cesar Chavez, an American labor leader and civil rights activist:

Mexican Americans

Mexican AmericanMexican-AmericanMexican
Born in Yuma, Arizona, to a Mexican American family, Chavez began his working life as a manual laborer and spent two years in the United States Navy.
The 1965 Delano grape strike, sparked by mostly Filipino American farmworkers, became an intersectional struggle when labor leaders and voting rights and civil rights activists Dolores Huerta, founder of the National Farm Workers Association, and her co-leader César Chávez united with the strikers to form the United Farm Workers.

Hispanic Americans

HispanicHispanic or LatinoLatino
Cesar Chavez (born César Estrada Chávez, ; March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was an American labor leader and Latino American civil rights activist. Chavez became the best known Latino American civil rights activist, and was strongly promoted by the American labor movement, which was eager to enroll Hispanic members.
Political activist César Chávez and novelist José Antonio Villarreal are famous Chicanos.

Colegio Cesar Chavez

Colegio César Chávez
During his lifetime, Colegio Cesar Chavez was one of the few institutions named in his honor, but after his death he became a major historical icon for the Latino community, with many schools, streets, and parks being named after him.
Colegio Cesar Chavez (Spanish for "Cesar Chavez College") was an American college-without-walls in Mount Angel, Oregon (the concept of college without walls is explained more below.) The college was named after Mexican American civil rights activist César Chávez.

Delano, California

DelanoDelano, CABakersfield
In 1962 he left the CSO to co-found the UFW, based in Delano, California.
The National Farm Workers' Association (NFWA), a largely Hispanic union led by Cesar Chavez, joined the strike within a week.

Community Service Organization

Relocating to California, where he married, he got involved in the Community Service Organization (CSO), through which he helped laborers register to vote.
The Community Service Organization (founded 1947) was an important California Latino civil rights organization, most famous for training Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta.

Cesar Chavez Day

César Chávez Day
His birthday, March 31, is a federal commemorative holiday (Cesar Chavez Day) observed by several states in the US.
The holiday celebrates the birth and legacy of the civil rights and labor movement activist Cesar Chavez on March 31 every year.

Richard Chavez

Richard
One of six children, he had two sisters, Rita and Vicki, and two brothers, Richard and Librado.
Chavez was the younger brother of labor leader César Chávez, who co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, now known as the United Farm Workers (UFW).

Presidential Medal of Freedom

Medal of FreedomCongressional Medal of FreedomUnited States Medal of Freedom
He received many honors and accolades, while still living and after his death, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994.
It may also be awarded posthumously (after the death of the recipient); examples (in chronological order) include John Wayne, John F. Kennedy, Pope John XXIII, Lyndon Johnson, Paul "Bear" Bryant, Thurgood Marshall, Cesar Chavez, Roberto Clemente, Jack Kemp, Harvey Milk, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, Elouise Cobell, Grace Hopper, Antonin Scalia, Elvis Presley and Babe Ruth.

Fred Ross

Fred Ross Sr.
Here, he befriended two social justice activists, Fred Ross and Father Donald McDonnell, both European-Americans whose activism was primarily within the Mexican-American community.
The CSO in San Jose, CA gave a young Cesar Chavez his first training in organizing, which he would later use in founding the United Farm Workers.

Yuma, Arizona

YumaYuma, AZArizona City
Born in Yuma, Arizona, to a Mexican American family, Chavez began his working life as a manual laborer and spent two years in the United States Navy. Cesar Estrada Chavez was born in Yuma, Arizona on March 31, 1927.

Robert F. Kennedy

Robert KennedyBobby KennedyRobert
During the hearings, subcommittee member Robert F. Kennedy expressed his support for the striking workers.
He was an advocate for issues related to human rights and social justice and formed relationships with Martin Luther King Jr. and Cesar Chavez.

Walter Reuther

Walter P. ReutherReuther brothersReuther, Walter
Chavez received support from labor leader Walter Reuther who, in December 1965, marched with the striking grape pickers in Delano.
An early supporter of Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers, he asked Robert F. Kennedy to visit and support Chavez.

Oxnard, California

OxnardOxnard, CACity of Oxnard
First working as avocado pickers in Oxnard and then as pea pickers in Pescadero, the family made it to San Jose, where they first lived in a garage in the city's impoverished Mexican district.

Nonviolence

nonviolentnon-violencenon-violent
In 1968, he fasted for 25 days, promoting the principle of nonviolence.
Here certain movements particularly influenced by a philosophy of nonviolence should be mentioned, including Mahatma Gandhi leading a successful decades-long nonviolent struggle against British rule in India, Martin Luther King's and James Bevel's adoption of Gandhi's nonviolent methods in their campaigns to win civil rights for African Americans, and César Chávez's campaigns of nonviolence in the 1960s to protest the treatment of farm workers in California.

Fasting

fastfastsfasted
Chavez undertook a number of "spiritual fasts", regarding the act as "a personal spiritual transformation".
César Chávez undertook a number of spiritual fasts, including a 25-day fast in 1968 promoting the principle of nonviolence, and a fast of 'thanksgiving and hope' to prepare for pre-arranged civil disobedience by farm workers.

United Farm Workers

United Farm Workers of AmericaNational Farm Workers AssociationUFW
Along with Dolores Huerta, he co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, later renamed the United Farm Workers (UFW) union.
It originated from the merger of two workers' rights organizations, the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) led by organizer Larry Itliong, and the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) led by César Chávez and Dolores Huerta.

Saul Alinsky

Saul D. AlinskyAlinskyAlinsky, Saul D.
Many of the CSO chapters fell apart after Ross or Chavez ceased running them, and to prevent this Saul Alinsky advised them to unite the chapters, of which there were over twenty, into a self-sustaining national organisation.
The IAF assisted black community organizing groups in Kansas City and Buffalo, and the Community Service Organization of Mexican Americans in California, training, among others, Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta.

Labor history of the United States

American labor movementlabor movementAmerican labor history
Chavez became the best known Latino American civil rights activist, and was strongly promoted by the American labor movement, which was eager to enroll Hispanic members.
Hispanics comprise a large fraction of the farm labor force, but due to the fact that agricultural workers were not protected under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) of 1935, there was little successful unionization before the arrival in the 1960s of Cesar Chavez (1927–1993) and Dolores Huerta (1930), who mobilized California workers into the United Farm Workers (UFW) organization.

San Joaquin Valley

San JoaquinSan Joaquin Valley (North)San Joaquin Valley, California
He spent his days traveling around the San Joaquin Valley, meeting with workers and encouraging them to join his association.
Ethnic and economic friction between Mexican-Americans and the valley's predominantly white farming elite manifested itself most notably during the 1960s and 1970s, when the United Farm Workers, led by César Chávez, went on numerous strikes and called for boycotts of table grapes.

Bracero program

bracerobracerosBracero'' program
He repeatedly heard concerns from local Mexican-American laborers that they were being routinely passed over or fired so that employers could hire cheaper Mexican guest workers, or braceros, in violation of federal law.
During his tenure with the Community Service Organization, César Chávez received a grant from the AWOC to organize in Oxnard, California, which culminated in a protest of domestic U.S. agricultural workers of the U.S. Department of Labor's administration of the program.

Arizona

AZState of ArizonaArizona, U.S.
Cesar Estrada Chavez was born in Yuma, Arizona on March 31, 1927.

Salad Bowl strike

lettucestrike against lettuce growers beganthe largest strike of farm workers in U.S. history
In the early 1970s, the UFW organized strikes and boycotts—including the Salad Bowl strike, the largest farm worker strike in U.S. history—to protest for, and later win, higher wages for those farm workers who were working for grape and lettuce growers.
Even as UFW leader César Chávez went on a hunger strike to protest the Teamsters' actions and a state district court imposed a temporary injunction to preempt UFW members from walking off the job, the UFW held secret talks with the Teamsters to avert a strike by the UFW.