Chamber of Horrors (Madame Tussauds)

Chamber of HorrorsChamber of Horrors at Madame Tussauds
The Chamber of Horrors was an original exhibition at Madame Tussauds in London, being an exhibition of waxworks of notorious murderers and other infamous historical figures.wikipedia
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Madame Tussauds

Madame TussaudMadame Tussauds London Madame Tussauds Museum
The Chamber of Horrors was an original exhibition at Madame Tussauds in London, being an exhibition of waxworks of notorious murderers and other infamous historical figures.
One of the main attractions of her museum was the Chamber of Horrors.

Wax museum

waxworkswaxwork museumwaxworks exhibition
The Chamber of Horrors was an original exhibition at Madame Tussauds in London, being an exhibition of waxworks of notorious murderers and other infamous historical figures.
Some wax museums have a special section dubbed the "Chamber of Horrors", in which the more grisly exhibits are displayed.

Marie Tussaud

Madame TussaudMadame Tussaud's Wax MuseumMadam Tussaud
The gallery first opened as a 'Separate Room' in Marie Tussaud's 1802 exhibition in London and quickly became a success as it showed historical personalities and artifacts rather than the freaks of nature popular in other waxworks of the day. When Marie Tussaud moved to London in 1802 to set up her own exhibition at the Lyceum Theatre she brought some of these figures with her and set them up in a separate gallery; and when later she toured her exhibits around the country she maintained this division in her exhibition using a 'Separate Room' to display them in.
In 1776, the exhibition was moved to the Palais Royal and, in 1782, Curtius opened a second exhibit, the Caverne des Grands Voleurs (Cavern of the Grand Thieves), a precursor to Tussaud's Chamber of Horrors, on Boulevard du Temple.

Philippe Curtius

The forerunner of Tussaud's Chamber of Horrors was the Caverne des Grands Voleurs (the Cavern of the Great Thieves) which had been founded by Dr Philippe Curtius as an adjunct to his main exhibition of waxworks in Paris in 1782.
He opened a second location on Boulevard du Temple in 1782, the Caverne des Grands Voleurs, a precursor to the later Chamber of Horrors.

Mary Pearcey

Other exhibits have included Colonel Despard, Arthur Thistlewood, William Corder, Florence Maybrick, Mary Pearcey, George Chapman, Hawley Harvey Crippen, Henri Landru, Buck Ruxton, Bruno Hauptmann, John Christie, John Haigh, George Joseph Smith and Charles Manson.
Madame Tussauds wax museum of London made a wax figure of Pearcey for their Chamber of Horrors exhibit, and also purchased the pram used in the murder and the contents of Pearcey's kitchen.

Murders at Stanfield Hall

James Bloomfield RushIsaac JermyJames Blomfield Rush
In 1886 the exhibits included Burke and Hare, James Bloomfield Rush, Charles Peace, William Marwood, Percy Lefroy Mapleton, Mary Ann Cotton, Israel Lipski, Franz Muller, William Palmer and Marie Manning.
A life-size waxwork representation of Rush was displayed in the Chamber of Horrors at Madame Tussauds in London, from 1849 until 1971.

William Palmer (murderer)

William PalmerDr William PalmerDr Palmer
In 1886 the exhibits included Burke and Hare, James Bloomfield Rush, Charles Peace, William Marwood, Percy Lefroy Mapleton, Mary Ann Cotton, Israel Lipski, Franz Muller, William Palmer and Marie Manning.
A wax effigy of Palmer was displayed in the Chamber of Horrors at Madame Tussaud's waxwork museum from 1857 until 1979.

Percy Lefroy Mapleton

In 1886 the exhibits included Burke and Hare, James Bloomfield Rush, Charles Peace, William Marwood, Percy Lefroy Mapleton, Mary Ann Cotton, Israel Lipski, Franz Muller, William Palmer and Marie Manning.
After his execution Mapleton's waxwork was exhibited in the Chamber of Horrors at Madame Tussauds.

Hawley Harvey Crippen

Dr CrippenDr. CrippenHawley Crippen
Other exhibits have included Colonel Despard, Arthur Thistlewood, William Corder, Florence Maybrick, Mary Pearcey, George Chapman, Hawley Harvey Crippen, Henri Landru, Buck Ruxton, Bruno Hauptmann, John Christie, John Haigh, George Joseph Smith and Charles Manson.
A waxwork of Crippen can be seen in the Chamber of Horrors at Madame Tussauds in London.

John Haigh

John George HaighHaighHaigh the Acid Bath Murderer
Other exhibits have included Colonel Despard, Arthur Thistlewood, William Corder, Florence Maybrick, Mary Pearcey, George Chapman, Hawley Harvey Crippen, Henri Landru, Buck Ruxton, Bruno Hauptmann, John Christie, John Haigh, George Joseph Smith and Charles Manson.

George Joseph Smith

Brides in the bathGeorge SmithJoseph Smith
Other exhibits have included Colonel Despard, Arthur Thistlewood, William Corder, Florence Maybrick, Mary Pearcey, George Chapman, Hawley Harvey Crippen, Henri Landru, Buck Ruxton, Bruno Hauptmann, John Christie, John Haigh, George Joseph Smith and Charles Manson.
For some years, Smith's waxwork was exhibited in the Chamber of Horrors at Madame Tussauds in London.

Jack the Ripper

RipperologistsRipperThe Ripper
For murderers of negligible fame, there was no waxwork figure of Jack the Ripper in the Chamber of Horrors, in accordance with Madame Tussaud's policy of not modelling persons whose likeness is unknown.
There is no waxwork figure of Jack the Ripper at Madame Tussauds' Chamber of Horrors, unlike murderers of lesser fame, in accordance with their policy of not modelling persons whose likeness is unknown.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
Here Curtius displayed wax figures of notorious French criminals who had been executed, as well as members of the French royal family and aristocracy who had been guillotined during the Revolution.

Lyceum Theatre, London

Lyceum TheatreLyceumLyceum Ballroom
When Marie Tussaud moved to London in 1802 to set up her own exhibition at the Lyceum Theatre she brought some of these figures with her and set them up in a separate gallery; and when later she toured her exhibits around the country she maintained this division in her exhibition using a 'Separate Room' to display them in.

Louis XVI of France

Louis XVIKing Louis XVIKing Louis XVI of France
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Marie Antoinette

Marie-AntoinetteQueen Marie AntoinetteQueen Marie-Antoinette
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Madame du Barry

Mme du BarryComtesse du BarryMadame DuBarry
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Jean-Paul Marat

Maratsection du Théâtre-Françaisdying revolutionary
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Maximilien Robespierre

RobespierreMaximilien de RobespierreMaximilian Robespierre
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Jacques Hébert

HébertJacques René HébertJacques-René Hébert
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Jean-Baptiste Carrier

CarrierJean Baptiste Carrier
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Antoine Quentin Fouquier-Tinville

Fouquier-TinvilleAntoine Fouquier-TinvilleFouquier
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Guillotine

guillotinedguillotiningbeheaded
Here Curtius displayed wax figures of notorious French criminals who had been executed, as well as members of the French royal family and aristocracy who had been guillotined during the Revolution. The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Bastille

The BastilleBastille PrisonBastile
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.

Mummy

mummiesmummifiedmummification
The exhibits at this time included the heads of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, as well as Madame du Barry, Marat, Robespierre, Hébert, Carrier and Fouquier-Tinville in addition to models of a guillotine and the Bastille and the Egyptian mummy from Curtius' collection.