A report on Geneva and Chamonix

A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858
The Chamonix Valley seen from La Flégère with the Mont Blanc in the background
L'Escalade is what Genevans call the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by troops sent by Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, to take Geneva. This imaginative image was drawn by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Frans Hogenberg, around 1603. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.
Horace-Benedict de Saussure, with Jacques Balmat (left) who points towards the summit of Mont Blanc, Monument at Chamonix.
Aerial view (1966)
Chamonix Valley: crossing the glacier on foot (between 1902 and 1904)
Satellite view of Geneva; Cointrin Airport is centre left.
Front and façade of the Chamonix - Mont-Blanc railway station.
The Geneva area seen from the Salève in France. The Jura mountains are on the horizon.
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Confluence of the Rhône and the Arve
Average temperature and precipitation 1961–1990
Coat of arms of Geneva as part of the pavement in front of the Reformation Wall, 2013
The Flowered Clock at the Quai du Général-Guisan (English Garden), during the 2012 Geneva Festival
Rue Pierre-Fatio in Geneva
Apartment buildings in the Quartier des Grottes
Geneva, with Lake Geneva in the background
Reformation Wall in Geneva; from left to right: William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox
Fireworks at the Fêtes de Genève, 2012
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The University of Geneva.
Geneva railway station
TCMC (Tramway Cornavin – Meyrin – CERN)
Geneva Sécheron railway station
TOSA Bus at PALEXPO Flash bus stops
The World Intellectual Property Organization.
The assembly hall of the Palace of Nations.
Gustave Ador
Christiane Brunner
John Calvin, c. 1550
Isaac Casaubon
Michel Decastel, 2012
Jean Henri Dunant, 1901
Kat Graham, 2017
Francois Huber
Paul Lachenal, 1939
Lenin in Switzerland, 1916
Amelie Mauresmo, 2014
Liliane Maury Pasquier, 2007
Pierre Prévost
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Ferdinand de Saussure
Michael Schade, 2012
Michel Simon, 1964
Johann Vogel, 2006
Voltaire
St. Pierre Cathedral
Collège Calvin
International Committee of the Red Cross (CICR)
Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva
Notre-Dame Church
Russian Orthodox Church
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Hôtel de Ville and the Tour Baudet
Institut et Musée Voltaire
Mallet House and Museum international de la Réforme
Tavel House
Brunswick Monument
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire
The Villa La Grange

In 1530, the inhabitants obtained from the Count of the Genevois the privilege of holding two fairs a year, while the valley was often visited by the civil officials and by the bishops of Geneva (first recorded visit in 1411, while St. Francis de Sales came there in 1606).

- Chamonix

Mont Salève (1379 m), just across the border in France, dominates the southerly view from the city centre, and Mont Blanc, the highest of the Alpine range, is visible from most of the city, towering high above Chamonix, which, along with Morzine, Le Grand Bornand, La Clusaz, and resorts of the Grand Massif such as Samoens, Morillon, and Flaine, are the closest French skiing destinations to Geneva.

- Geneva
A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Haute-Savoie

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Department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of Southeastern France, bordering both Switzerland and Italy.

Department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of Southeastern France, bordering both Switzerland and Italy.

Haute-Savoie highlighted in brown in the former Rhône-Alpes region, with arrondissements outlined
Map of Haute-Savoie
Aerial view of Annecy Lake from the southeast
Reblochon cheese
Yvoire and the Lake Léman
Arve Valley and the town of Cluses
Chateau de Ruphy in Duingt
Seyssel
Montriond Lake
Aiguille du Midi

It is noted for winter sports; the first Winter Olympic Games were held at Chamonix in 1924.

Many people who live in Haute-Savoie (more than 52,200 in November 2006) work in Switzerland (in the cantons of Geneva, Vaud and Valais).

Portrait of Horace Bénédict de Saussure (after the picture by Juel, in the Library at Geneva)

Horace Bénédict de Saussure

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Genevan geologist, meteorologist, physicist, mountaineer and Alpine explorer, often called the founder of alpinism and modern meteorology, and considered to be the first person to build a successful solar oven.

Genevan geologist, meteorologist, physicist, mountaineer and Alpine explorer, often called the founder of alpinism and modern meteorology, and considered to be the first person to build a successful solar oven.

Portrait of Horace Bénédict de Saussure (after the picture by Juel, in the Library at Geneva)
Christian von Mechel, Descent from Mont-Blanc in 1787 by H.B. de Saussure, copper engraving; collection of Teylers Museum, Haarlem
Print by Charles Simon Pradier after the portrait by Jean-Pierre Saint-Ours
Horace-Bénédict de Saussure monument at Chamonix. Beside him is Jacques Balmat.
Saussurea pygmaea, from the genus named after Saussure
Bust of Saussure, on display on the grounds of the Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva.

Horace Bénédict de Saussure was born 17 February 1740, in Conches, near Geneva (today in Switzerland but then an independent republic), and died in Geneva 22 January 1799.

His achievements did much to attract tourists to places such as Chamonix.

Portrait (1798) by Jean-Pierre Saint-Ours

Marc-Théodore Bourrit

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Portrait (1798) by Jean-Pierre Saint-Ours
Description des Alpes Pennines et Rhetiennes, 1781

Marc-Théodore Bourrit (1739–1819) was a genevois traveller and writer.

His last visit to Chamonix was in 1812.