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Great Offices of State

officea senior positionGreat Office of State
The position is considered one of the four Great Offices of State, and in recent times has come to be the most powerful office in British politics after the prime minister.
They are the Prime Minister, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Foreign Secretary and Home Secretary.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleyPrime Minister
In the 18th and early 19th centuries, it was common for the prime minister also to serve as Chancellor of the Exchequer if he sat in the Commons; the last chancellor who was simultaneously prime minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer was Stanley Baldwin in 1923.
In 1922, Baldwin was one of the prime movers in the withdrawal of Conservative support from Lloyd George; he subsequently became Chancellor of the Exchequer in Bonar Law's Conservative ministry.

Gordon Brown

BrownJames Gordon BrownMr. Brown
Gordon Brown, who became chancellor when Labour came into Government in 1997, had a large personal power base in the party.
He served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Blair Government from 1997 to 2007.

11 Downing Street

11Number 1110
As the Second Lord, his official residence is 11 Downing Street in London, next door to the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury (a title that has for many years been held by the prime minister), who resides in 10 Downing Street.
11 Downing Street (sometimes referred to as just Number 11) is the official residence of Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer (who traditionally also has the title of Second Lord of the Treasury).

Finance minister

minister of financeFinancefinance ministry
The chancellor is responsible for all economic and financial matters, equivalent to the role of finance minister in other nations.
The position of the finance minister might be named for this portfolio, but it may also have some other name, like "Treasurer" or, in the United Kingdom, "Chancellor of the Exchequer".

Lords Commissioners of the Treasury

Lord Commissioner of the TreasuryJunior Lord of the TreasuryJunior Lords of the Treasury
The holder of the office of Chancellor of the Exchequer is ex officio Second Lord of the Treasury as a member of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer.
The board consists of the First Lord of the Treasury, the Second Lord of the Treasury, and four or more junior lords to whom this title is usually applied.

First Lord of the Treasury

appointedFirst Commissioner (Lord) of the TreasuryFirst Lord
As the Second Lord, his official residence is 11 Downing Street in London, next door to the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury (a title that has for many years been held by the prime minister), who resides in 10 Downing Street.
This office is not equivalent to the usual position of the "Treasurer" in other governments; the closer equivalent of a Treasurer in the United Kingdom is the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who is the Second Lord of the Treasury.

Robert Lowe

LoweMr. L.peerage
A previous chancellor, Robert Lowe, described the office in the following terms in the House of Commons, on 11 April 1870: "The Chancellor of the Exchequer is a man whose duties make him more or less of a taxing machine. He is entrusted with a certain amount of misery which it is his duty to distribute as fairly as he can."
He held office under William Ewart Gladstone as Chancellor of the Exchequer between 1868 and 1873 and as Home Secretary between 1873 and 1874.

Hugh Dalton

DaltonEdward Hugh John Neale DaltonHugh Dalton, who was to become
Hugh Dalton, on his way to giving the budget speech in 1947, inadvertently blurted out key details to a newspaper reporter, and they appeared in print before he made his speech.
Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton, Baron Dalton, (16 August 1887 – 13 February 1962) was a British Labour Party economist and politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1945 to 1947.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury

Shadow Financial Secretary to the TreasuryFinancial Secretaries to the TreasuryFinancial Secretary
The most important junior minister is the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, a member of the Cabinet, to whom the negotiations with other government departments on the details of government spending are delegated, followed by the Paymaster General, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the Economic Secretary to the Treasury.
It is the fifth most significant ministerial role within the Treasury after the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, and the Paymaster General.

2012 United Kingdom budget

2012 budget2012budget
The 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2012 and 2016 budgets were all delivered on a Wednesday, summarised in a speech to the House of Commons.
The 2012 United Kingdom budget was delivered by George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to the House of Commons on Wednesday 21 March 2012.

Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Shadow Chief Secretary to the TreasuryChief SecretaryChief Secretaries to the Treasury
The most important junior minister is the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, a member of the Cabinet, to whom the negotiations with other government departments on the details of government spending are delegated, followed by the Paymaster General, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the Economic Secretary to the Treasury.
The Chief Secretary to the Treasury is the third most senior ministerial position in HM Treasury, after the First Lord of the Treasury and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Paymaster General

Paymaster General's OfficeShadow Paymaster GeneralPaymaster-General
The most important junior minister is the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, a member of the Cabinet, to whom the negotiations with other government departments on the details of government spending are delegated, followed by the Paymaster General, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the Economic Secretary to the Treasury.
When the post is held by a minister in HM Treasury it is typically given to the fourth highest-ranking minister, after the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury.

Economic Secretary to the Treasury

Shadow Economic Secretary to the TreasuryShadow Economic SecretaryEconomic Secretary to HM Treasury
The most important junior minister is the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, a member of the Cabinet, to whom the negotiations with other government departments on the details of government spending are delegated, followed by the Paymaster General, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the Economic Secretary to the Treasury.
The Economic Secretary to the Treasury is the sixth-most senior ministerial post in the UK Treasury, after the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, the Paymaster-General and the Financial Secretary to the Treasury.

2016 United Kingdom budget

2016 BudgetBudget2016
The 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2012 and 2016 budgets were all delivered on a Wednesday, summarised in a speech to the House of Commons.
The 2016 United Kingdom budget was delivered by George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to the House of Commons on Wednesday, 16 March 2016.

Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury

Exchequer Secretary to the UK TreasuryShadow Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury
Whilst not continuously in use, there can also be appointed a Commercial Secretary to the Treasury and an Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury.
The Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury is a junior ministerial post in the British Treasury, ranked below the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, the Paymaster General and the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, and alongside the Economic Secretary to the Treasury.

2007 United Kingdom budget

2007BudgetBudget 2007: Building Britain's long-term future: Prosperity and fairness for families
The 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2012 and 2016 budgets were all delivered on a Wednesday, summarised in a speech to the House of Commons.
It would turn out to be Brown's last Budget as Chancellor of the Exchequer, becoming Prime Minister on 27 June 2007.

Secretary to the Treasury

Financial Secretary to the TreasurySecretaries to the TreasuryChief Secretary to the Treasury
Two other officials are given the title of a Secretary to the Treasury, although neither is a government minister in the Treasury: the Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury is the Government Chief Whip in the House of Commons; the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury is not a minister but the senior civil servant in the Treasury.
Of the Commissioners, only the Second Lord of the Treasury, who is also the Chancellor of the Exchequer, is a Treasury minister (the others are the Prime Minister and the Government Whips).

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterUK Prime Minister
The position is considered one of the four Great Offices of State, and in recent times has come to be the most powerful office in British politics after the prime minister. As the Second Lord, his official residence is 11 Downing Street in London, next door to the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury (a title that has for many years been held by the prime minister), who resides in 10 Downing Street.
Today the Prime Minister (First Lord of the Treasury), the Chancellor of the Exchequer (responsible for The Budget) and other senior members of the Cabinet sit on the Treasury bench and present policies in much the same way Ministers did late in the 17th century.

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
The original Budget briefcase was first used by William Ewart Gladstone in 1853 and continued in use until 1965 when James Callaghan was the first chancellor to break with tradition when he used a newer box. Previous chancellors have opted for whisky (Kenneth Clarke), gin and tonic (Geoffrey Howe), brandy and water (Benjamin Disraeli and John Major), spritzer (Nigel Lawson) and sherry and beaten egg (William Gladstone).
He also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer four times.

Alistair Darling

DarlingAlistair Darling, Baron Darling of RoulanishLord Darling of Roulanish
It reverted to the chancellor in 2007, then Alistair Darling.
Alistair Maclean Darling, Baron Darling of Roulanish, (born 28 November 1953), is a British Labour Party politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Labour Government from 2007-2010 and as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1987 until he stepped down in 2015, most recently for Edinburgh South West.

James Callaghan

CallaghanJim CallaghanJames Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff
The original Budget briefcase was first used by William Ewart Gladstone in 1853 and continued in use until 1965 when James Callaghan was the first chancellor to break with tradition when he used a newer box.
So far the only holder of all four of the Great Offices of State, Callaghan served as Chancellor of the Exchequer (1964–1967), Home Secretary (1967–1970) and Foreign Secretary (1974–1976) prior to his appointment as Prime Minister.

John Major

Sir John MajorMajorPrime Minister
Previous chancellors have opted for whisky (Kenneth Clarke), gin and tonic (Geoffrey Howe), brandy and water (Benjamin Disraeli and John Major), spritzer (Nigel Lawson) and sherry and beaten egg (William Gladstone).
He served as Foreign Secretary and then Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Thatcher Government from 1989 to 1990, and was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Huntingdon from 1979 until his retirement in 2001.

Kenneth Clarke

Ken ClarkeClarke The Right Honourable '''Kenneth Clarke
Previous chancellors have opted for whisky (Kenneth Clarke), gin and tonic (Geoffrey Howe), brandy and water (Benjamin Disraeli and John Major), spritzer (Nigel Lawson) and sherry and beaten egg (William Gladstone).
Clarke, described by the press as a 'Big Beast' of British politics, has served in the Cabinet as Chancellor of the Exchequer, Home Secretary, Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, Education Secretary, Health Secretary and minister without portfolio.

Geoffrey Howe

Sir Geoffrey HoweGeoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of AberavonHowe
Previous chancellors have opted for whisky (Kenneth Clarke), gin and tonic (Geoffrey Howe), brandy and water (Benjamin Disraeli and John Major), spritzer (Nigel Lawson) and sherry and beaten egg (William Gladstone).
Howe was Margaret Thatcher's longest-serving Cabinet minister, successively holding the posts of Chancellor of the Exchequer, Foreign Secretary, and finally Leader of the House of Commons, Deputy Prime Minister and Lord President of the Council.