Charcot–Bouchard aneurysm

microaneurysmmicroaneurysms
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms (also known as miliary aneurysms or microaneurysms) are aneurysms of the brain vasculature which occur in small blood vessels (less than 300 micrometre diameter).wikipedia
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Aneurysm

aneurysmsaneurismruptured aneurysm
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms (also known as miliary aneurysms or microaneurysms) are aneurysms of the brain vasculature which occur in small blood vessels (less than 300 micrometre diameter).
The brain, including cerebral aneurysms, berry aneurysms, and Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms.

Jean-Martin Charcot

CharcotJean CharcotJean Martin Charcot
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are named for the French physicians Jean-Martin Charcot and Charles-Joseph Bouchard.
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms (tiny aneurysms of the penetrating branches of middle cerebral artery in hypertensives), named with Charles-Joseph Bouchard.

Charles Jacques Bouchard

BouchardCharles BouchardCharles-Joseph Bouchard
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are named for the French physicians Jean-Martin Charcot and Charles-Joseph Bouchard.
He was a student of Jean Charcot at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, and with Charcot described a disorder that would later be known as a "Charcot-Bouchard aneurysm".

Blood vessel

vascularblood vesselsintravascular
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms (also known as miliary aneurysms or microaneurysms) are aneurysms of the brain vasculature which occur in small blood vessels (less than 300 micrometre diameter).

Micrometre

µmμmmicrometers
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms (also known as miliary aneurysms or microaneurysms) are aneurysms of the brain vasculature which occur in small blood vessels (less than 300 micrometre diameter).

Basal ganglia

basal nucleibasalbasal ganglia (BG)
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are most often located in the lenticulostriate vessels of the basal ganglia and are associated with chronic hypertension.

Chronic condition

chronicchronic diseasechronic diseases
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are most often located in the lenticulostriate vessels of the basal ganglia and are associated with chronic hypertension.

Hypertension

high blood pressurehypertensivearterial hypertension
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are most often located in the lenticulostriate vessels of the basal ganglia and are associated with chronic hypertension.

Intracerebral hemorrhage

cerebral hemorrhagebrain hemorrhagecerebral haemorrhage
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are a common cause of cerebral hemorrhage.

Stroke

strokesischemic strokecerebrovascular accident
If a Charcot–Bouchard aneurysm ruptures, it will lead to an intracerebral hemorrhage, which can cause hemorrhagic stroke, typically experienced as a sudden focal paralysis or loss of sensation.

Anterolateral central arteries

lenticulostriatelenticulostriate arterieslenticulostriate artery
Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms are most often located in the lenticulostriate vessels of the basal ganglia and are associated with chronic hypertension. The common artery involved is the lenticulostriate branch of the middle cerebral artery.

Middle cerebral artery

Middle cerebralinfarction, middle cerebral arterymiddle cerebral arteries
The common artery involved is the lenticulostriate branch of the middle cerebral artery.

Bleeding

hemorrhagehaemorrhagehemorrhaging
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Putamen

bilateral putamencaudate putamenputaminal
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Caudate nucleus

caudatecaudate nucleibilateral caudate nucleus
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Thalamus

thalamicthalamimetathalamus
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Pons

pontineannular protuberancePons Varolii
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Cerebellum

cerebellarcerebellar cortexcerebellar nuclei
Common locations of hypertensive hemorrhages include the putamen, caudate, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum.

Young–Laplace equation

Law of LaplaceLaplace's lawcurvature corresponding to a nonzero pressure difference
As with any aneurysm, once formed they have a tendency to expand and eventually rupture, in keeping with the Law of Laplace.

Intracranial hemorrhage

intracranial bleedingintracranial haemorrhageintracranial hematoma
* Intracranial hemorrhage

Diabetic retinopathy

diabetic macular edemaretinopathydamage to the eyes
The only way to detect NPDR is by fundus photography, in which microaneurysms (microscopic blood-filled bulges in the artery walls) can be seen.

Intracranial aneurysm

brain aneurysmcerebral aneurysmaneurysm
Microaneurysms, also known as Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms, typically occur in small blood vessels (less than 300 micrometre diameter), most often the lenticulostriate vessels of the basal ganglia, and are associated with chronic hypertension.

List of neuroscientists

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Outline of cardiology

Hemorrhagic stroke – Infarction of the brain due to internal bleeding from Charcot–Bouchard aneurysms.

Charcot

Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms, tiny aneurysms of the penetrating branches of middle cerebral artery in people with hypertension