Charles Dickens

DickensDickensianDickens, Charles Charles DickensCharles John Huffam DickensDicken[ Dickens[Charles] DickensCharlesCharles 'Boz' Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic.wikipedia
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The Pickwick Papers

Pickwick PapersPickwickThe Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
Dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Papers.
The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (also known as The Pickwick Papers) was Charles Dickens's first novel.

David Copperfield

David Copperfield (novel)novelof the same name
For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens improved the character with positive features. Righteous indignation stemming from his own situation and the conditions under which working-class people lived became major themes of his works, and it was this unhappy period in his youth to which he alluded in his favourite, and most autobiographical, novel, David Copperfield: "I had no advice, no counsel, no encouragement, no consolation, no assistance, no support, of any kind, from anyone, that I can call to mind, as I hope to go to heaven!"
David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens.

Great Expectations

Herbert PocketSatis Housenovel
Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London.
Great Expectations is the thirteenth novel by Charles Dickens and his penultimate completed novel, that depicts the education of an orphan nicknamed Pip (a bildungsroman).

Oliver Twist

Mr. BumbleOlivernovel
Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London.
Oliver Twist; or, the Parish Boy's Progress is Charles Dickens's second novel, and was first published as a serial from 1837 to 1839.

A Christmas Carol

Christmas Carol1843 novellanovella of the same name
His 1843 novella A Christmas Carol remains especially popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre.
Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, commonly known as A Christmas Carol', is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1843 and illustrated by John Leech.

John Dickens

Johnhis father
Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on 7 February 1812, at 1 Mile End Terrace (now 393 Commercial Road), Landport in Portsea Island (Portsmouth), the second of eight children of Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 1789–1863) and John Dickens (1785–1851).
John Dickens (21 August 1785 – 31 March 1851) was the father of English novelist Charles Dickens and was the model for Mr Micawber in his son's semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield.

A Tale of Two Cities

Tale of Two Citiesnovel of the same nameThe Golden Thread
His 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities (set in London and Paris) is his best-known work of historical fiction.
A Tale of Two Cities is an 1859 historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, EnglandCity of PortsmouthPortsmouth, Hampshire
Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on 7 February 1812, at 1 Mile End Terrace (now 393 Commercial Road), Landport in Portsea Island (Portsmouth), the second of eight children of Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 1789–1863) and John Dickens (1785–1851).
Portsmouth is also the birthplace of author Charles Dickens, engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and former Prime Minister James Callaghan.

Dombey and Son

DiogenesPaul Dombey
Huffam is thought to be the inspiration for Paul Dombey, the owner of a shipping company in Dickens's novel Dombey and Son (1848).
Dombey and Son is a novel by English author Charles Dickens.

Serial (literature)

serialserializedfascicle
His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication.
The wild success of Charles Dickens's The Pickwick Papers, first published in 1836, is widely considered to have established the viability and appeal of the serialized format within periodical literature.

Elizabeth Dickens

Elizabeth BarrowElizabeth
Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on 7 February 1812, at 1 Mile End Terrace (now 393 Commercial Road), Landport in Portsea Island (Portsmouth), the second of eight children of Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 1789–1863) and John Dickens (1785–1851).
Elizabeth Culliford Dickens (née Barrow; 21 December 1789 – 13 September 1863) was the wife of John Dickens and the mother of English novelist Charles Dickens.

Child labour

child laborchildrenlabor
Dickens has been praised by many of his fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell, G. K. Chesterton, and Tom Wolfe—for his realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism.
The author Charles Dickens worked at the age of 12 in a blacking factory, with his family in debtor's prison.

Cliffhanger

To be continuedcliffhanger endingcliff-hanger
Cliffhanger endings in his serial publications kept readers in suspense.
Cliffhangers later appeared as an element of the Victorian serial novel that emerged in the 1840s, with many associating the form with Charles Dickens, a pioneer of the serial publication of narrative fiction.

Tobias Smollett

SmollettTobias George SmollettTobias Smollet
Charles spent time outdoors, but also read voraciously, including the picaresque novels of Tobias Smollett and Henry Fielding, as well as Robinson Crusoe and Gil Blas.
He was best known for his picaresque novels, such as The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748), The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle (1751) and The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771), which influenced later novelists including Charles Dickens.

Marshalsea

Marshalsea PrisonWhite Lion prisonMarshalsea Debtors' Prison
The family had left Kent amidst rapidly mounting debts, and, living beyond his means, John Dickens was forced by his creditors into the Marshalsea debtors' prison in Southwark, London in 1824.
The prison became known around the world in the 19th century through the writing of the English novelist Charles Dickens, whose father was sent there in 1824, when Dickens was 12, for a debt to a baker.

John Forster (biographer)

John ForsterForsterForster, John
As he recalled to John Forster (from The Life of Charles Dickens):
He was a friend of author Charles Dickens.

Little Dorrit

Little DorrittAmy Dorriteponymous book
Dickens later used the prison as a setting in Little Dorrit.
Little Dorrit is a novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in serial form between 1855 and 1857.

Henry James

JamesJamesianJames, Henry
However, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of sentimentalism.
During a 14-month trip through Europe in 1869–70 he met Ruskin, Dickens, Matthew Arnold, William Morris, and George Eliot.

Debtors' prison

debtor's prisondebtors prisonimprisonment for debt
Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. The family had left Kent amidst rapidly mounting debts, and, living beyond his means, John Dickens was forced by his creditors into the Marshalsea debtors' prison in Southwark, London in 1824.
The father of the English author Charles Dickens was sent to one of these prisons (the Marshalsea), which were often described in Dickens's novels.

Victorian era

VictorianVictorian-eraVictorian period
He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.
Victorian Britain, like the periods before it, was interested in literature (see Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, Robert Louis Stevenson and William Makepeace Thackeray), theatre and the arts (see Aesthetic movement and Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood), and music, drama, and opera were widely attended.

Sketches by Boz

His journalism, in the form of sketches in periodicals, formed his first collection of pieces, published in 1836: Sketches by Boz—Boz being a family nickname he employed as a pseudonym for some years.
Sketches by "Boz," Illustrative of Every-day Life and Every-day People (commonly known as Sketches by Boz) is a collection of short pieces Charles Dickens originally published in various newspapers and other periodicals between 1833 and 1836.

Augustus Dickens

Augustus Newnham DickensAugustus
Dickens apparently adopted it from the nickname "Moses", which he had given to his youngest brother Augustus Dickens, after a character in Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield.
Augustus Newnham Dickens (10 November 1827 – 4 October 1866) was the youngest brother of English novelist Charles Dickens, and the inspiration for Charles's pen name 'Boz'.

Autobiographical novel

semi-autobiographicalsemi-autobiographical novelautobiographical
Righteous indignation stemming from his own situation and the conditions under which working-class people lived became major themes of his works, and it was this unhappy period in his youth to which he alluded in his favourite, and most autobiographical, novel, David Copperfield: "I had no advice, no counsel, no encouragement, no consolation, no assistance, no support, of any kind, from anyone, that I can call to mind, as I hope to go to heaven!"

Hablot Knight Browne

PhizHablot BrowneHablot K. Browne
Seymour committed suicide after the second instalment, and Dickens, who wanted to write a connected series of sketches, hired "Phiz" to provide the engravings (which were reduced from four to two per instalment) for the story.
Well-known by his pen name, Phiz, he illustrated books by Charles Dickens, Charles Lever, and Harrison Ainsworth.

The Morning Chronicle

Morning ChronicleMorning Chronicle and London Advertiser
He rented rooms at Furnival's Inn and worked as a political journalist, reporting on Parliamentary debates, and he travelled across Britain to cover election campaigns for the Morning Chronicle.
It was notable for having been the first steady employer of essayist William Hazlitt as a political reporter, and the first steady employer of Charles Dickens as a journalist; for publishing the articles by Henry Mayhew that were collected and published in book format in 1851 as London Labour and the London Poor; and for publishing other major writers, such as John Stuart Mill.