Charles Edward Munroe

Charles E. MunroeCharles Munroe
Charles Edward Munroe (24 May 1849 – 7 December 1938) was an American chemist, discoverer of the Munroe effect, and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the George Washington University.wikipedia
22 Related Articles

Shaped charge

hollow chargeMunroe effectshaped-charge
Charles Edward Munroe (24 May 1849 – 7 December 1938) was an American chemist, discoverer of the Munroe effect, and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the George Washington University. In 1886, he joined the Naval Torpedo Station and War College at Newport, Rhode Island as a chemist, where he discovered the Munroe effect, the basis for explosive shaped charges.
The Munroe effect is named after Charles E. Munroe, who discovered it in 1888.

Chemist

chemistsresearch chemistchemical
Charles Edward Munroe (24 May 1849 – 7 December 1938) was an American chemist, discoverer of the Munroe effect, and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the George Washington University.

Cambridge, Massachusetts

CambridgeCambridge, MACambridge, Mass.
He was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts and studied at the Lawrence scientific school of Harvard, graduating in 1871.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeUniversity of Harvard
He was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts and studied at the Lawrence scientific school of Harvard, graduating in 1871.

Annapolis, Maryland

AnnapolisAnnapolis, MDAnnapolis, Md.
He then took a job as an assistant professor of chemistry at the college until 1874, when he moved to Annapolis to become a professor of chemistry at the United States Naval Academy.

United States Naval Academy

U.S. Naval AcademyNaval AcademyUS Naval Academy
He then took a job as an assistant professor of chemistry at the college until 1874, when he moved to Annapolis to become a professor of chemistry at the United States Naval Academy.

Newport, Rhode Island

NewportNewport, RINewport, R.I.
In 1886, he joined the Naval Torpedo Station and War College at Newport, Rhode Island as a chemist, where he discovered the Munroe effect, the basis for explosive shaped charges.

Nobel Prize

NobelNobel laureateNobel Prizes
He wrote over 100 books on explosives and chemistry, and was appointed in 1900 by the Swedish Academy of Science to nominate the candidate for the Nobel Prize in chemistry.

American Chemical Society

ACSACS PublicationsAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
In addition, Munroe served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1898 and as a consultant to the United States Geological Survey and the United States Bureau of Mines.

United States Geological Survey

USGSU.S. Geological SurveyUSGS 7.5' topographic map
In addition, Munroe served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1898 and as a consultant to the United States Geological Survey and the United States Bureau of Mines.

United States Bureau of Mines

U.S. Bureau of MinesBureau of MinesUS Bureau of Mines
In addition, Munroe served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1898 and as a consultant to the United States Geological Survey and the United States Bureau of Mines.

Gelman Library

Estelle and Melvin Gelman Library
* Charles Munroe Papers, 1894–1936 (1 linear ft.) are housed in the Special Collections Research Center, Estelle and Melvin Gelman Library, The George Washington University.

George Washington University

The George Washington UniversityGeorge WashingtonColumbian College
Charles Edward Munroe (24 May 1849 – 7 December 1938) was an American chemist, discoverer of the Munroe effect, and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the George Washington University. * Charles Munroe Papers, 1894–1936 (1 linear ft.) are housed in the Special Collections Research Center, Estelle and Melvin Gelman Library, The George Washington University.

PIAT

Projector, Infantry, Anti TankBritish PIATPIAT guns
The origins of the PIAT can be traced back as far as 1888, when an American engineer by the name of Charles Edward Munroe was experimenting with guncotton; he discovered that the explosive would yield a great deal more damage if there were a recess in it facing the target.

E. E. Smith

E. E. "Doc" SmithE.E. SmithEdward E. Smith
Smith earned his master's degree in chemistry from the George Washington University in 1917, studying under Dr. Charles E. Munroe.

Theodore Roosevelt Island

Analostan IslandMason's IslandTheodore Roosevelt Island Park
Following the declaration of war against Spain in 1898, the island was used as a test site for a number of private experiments in electrical ignition of the explosives dynamite and jovite led by the chemist Charles Edward Munroe of Columbian University.