Charles F. Passel

Paul Siple in 1932

Polar scientist responsible along with Paul Siple for the development of the wind chill factor parameter.

- Charles F. Passel
Paul Siple in 1932

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Paul Siple in 1932

Paul Siple

American Antarctic explorer and geographer who took part in six Antarctic expeditions, including the two Byrd expeditions of 1928–1930 and 1933–1935, representing the Boy Scouts of America as an Eagle Scout.

American Antarctic explorer and geographer who took part in six Antarctic expeditions, including the two Byrd expeditions of 1928–1930 and 1933–1935, representing the Boy Scouts of America as an Eagle Scout.

Paul Siple in 1932

With Charles F. Passel he developed the wind chill factor, and Siple coined the term.

A chart of wind chill values for given air temperatures and wind speeds

Wind chill

Lowering of body temperature due to the passing-flow of lower-temperature air.

Lowering of body temperature due to the passing-flow of lower-temperature air.

A chart of wind chill values for given air temperatures and wind speeds
alt=Graph of degrees of wind chill for wind speed and air temperature|Celsius wind chill index
Comparison of old and new wind chill values at {{convert|-15|°C|°F}}|alt=Graph comparing "old" and "new" wind chill values by wind speed at 15°C air temperature
alt=Picture of a manual wind chill calculator|Wind chill calculator

The first wind chill formulas and tables were developed by Paul Allman Siple and Charles F. Passel working in the Antarctic before the Second World War, and were made available by the National Weather Service by the 1970s.

Emblem of the United States Navy

United States Antarctic Service Expedition

Expedition jointly sponsored by the United States Navy, State Department, Department of the Interior and The Treasury.

Expedition jointly sponsored by the United States Navy, State Department, Department of the Interior and The Treasury.

Emblem of the United States Navy

Charles F. Passel

Harold P. Gilmour. He is seen here at his "desk" at the West Base (Little America III) in May, 1940.

Mount Gilmour

Mountain 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of Mount Passel on the central part of the irregular ridge separating Crevasse Valley Glacier and Arthur Davis Glacier (ex-Warpasgiljo Glacier), in the Edsel Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica.

Mountain 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of Mount Passel on the central part of the irregular ridge separating Crevasse Valley Glacier and Arthur Davis Glacier (ex-Warpasgiljo Glacier), in the Edsel Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica.

Harold P. Gilmour. He is seen here at his "desk" at the West Base (Little America III) in May, 1940.
Mount Gilmour as seen from an aerial view photograph on p31 of Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (vol. 89, 1945)

The four-man party was composed of Lawrence A. Warner, leader and geologist, Charles F. Passel, geologist and radio operator, Harold P. Gilmour "Gil", recorder and collector of biological specimens and Loran Wells "Joe", photographer and observer.

Mount Everest, Earth's highest mountain

Mount Passel

Ridgelike mountain 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of the Swanson Mountains in the Ford Ranges, Marie Byrd Land.

Ridgelike mountain 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of the Swanson Mountains in the Ford Ranges, Marie Byrd Land.

Mount Everest, Earth's highest mountain

Discovered in December 1940 by members of a geological party of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) which visited this area, and named for Charles F. Passel, geologist and radio operator of that party.

Harold P. Gilmour circa 1939.

Harold P. Gilmour

Volunteer Antarctic explorer, at $1 per annum, for the 1939–1941 Byrd Polar Expedition to Antarctica, as part of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS).

Volunteer Antarctic explorer, at $1 per annum, for the 1939–1941 Byrd Polar Expedition to Antarctica, as part of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS).

Harold P. Gilmour circa 1939.
USAS Official Portrait of Harold P. Gilmour.
Harold P. Gilmour. He is seen here at his "desk" at the West Base (Little America III) in May 1940.
Portrait of Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd that says: "To my friend Harold Gilmour who made such a great contribution to the success of the US Antarctic Service" Signed: Richard E. Byrd

The four-man party was composed of Lawrence A. Warner, leader and geologist, Charles F. Passel, geologist and radio operator, Harold P. Gilmour "Gil", recorder and collector of biological specimens and Loran Wells "Joe", photographer and observer.

Montpelier, Ohio

Village in Williams County, Ohio, United States.

Village in Williams County, Ohio, United States.

Paul Allman Siple, Antarctic explorer, who, with Charles F. Passel, developed the first formula and table for measuring wind chill, a term which Siple coined.

Warpasgiljo Glacier as seen towards the West from an aerial view photograph on p30 of Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (vol. 89, 1945)

Warpasgiljo Glacier

Valley glacier about 25 mi long, flowing West to Sulzberger Ice Shelf between the Swanson Mountains on the North and Mounts Rea and Cooper on the South, in the Edsel Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land.

Valley glacier about 25 mi long, flowing West to Sulzberger Ice Shelf between the Swanson Mountains on the North and Mounts Rea and Cooper on the South, in the Edsel Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land.

Warpasgiljo Glacier as seen towards the West from an aerial view photograph on p30 of Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (vol. 89, 1945)

The four-man party was composed of Lawrence A. Warner, leader and geologist, Charles F. Passel, geologist and radio operator, Harold P. Gilmour "Gil", recorder and collector of biological specimens and Loran Wells "Joe", photographer and observer.