Charles Iveswikipedia
Charles Edward Ives (October 20, 1874May 19, 1954) was an American modernist composer.
IvesCharles IvesIves, CharlesCharles Ives ScholarshipIvesian

Tone cluster

tone clustertone clustersclusters
He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.
During the same period, Charles Ives employed them in several compositions that were not publicly performed until the late 1920s or 1930s.

Quarter tone

quarter tonequarter-tonequarter tones
He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.
Composers who have written music using this scale include: Pierre Boulez, Julián Carrillo, Mildred Couper, George Enescu, Alberto Ginastera, Gérard Grisey, Alois Hába, Ljubica Marić, Charles Ives, Tristan Murail, Krzysztof Penderecki, Giacinto Scelsi, Ammar El Sherei, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Tui St. George Tucker, Ivan Alexandrovich Wyschnegradsky, and Iannis Xenakis.

Experimental music

experimentalexperimental musicavant-garde
He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.
In Germany, the publication of Cage's article was anticipated by several months in a lecture delivered by Wolfgang Edward Rebner at the Darmstädter Ferienkurse on 13 August 1954, titled “Amerikanische Experimentalmusik". Rebner's lecture extended the concept back in time to include Charles Ives, Edgard Varèse, and Henry Cowell, as well as Cage, due to their focus on sound as such rather than compositional method.

Variations on "America"

He became a church organist at the age of 14 and wrote various hymns and songs for church services, including his Variations on "America", which he wrote for a Fourth of July concert in Brewster, New York.
Variations on "America", is a composition for organ by the American composer Charles Ives.

Symphony No. 1 (Ives)

Symphony No. 1Symphony No. 1 in D MinorIves' Symphony No. 1
He wrote his Symphony No. 1 as his senior thesis under Parker's supervision.
Charles Ives's Symphony No. 1 in D minor, written between 1898 and 1902, is an example of how Ives synthesized ideas from composers who came before him.

Simultaneity (music)

simultaneouslysimultaneityMultidimensional
A strong influence of young Charles may have been sitting in the Danbury town square, listening to George's marching band and other bands on other sides of the square simultaneously.
This first appeared in the music of Charles Ives, and is common in the music of Conlon Nancarrow and others.

Horatio Parker

Horatio ParkerH. W. Parker
In September 1894, Ives entered Yale University, studying under Horatio Parker.
He was a central figure in musical life in New Haven, Connecticut in the late 19th century, and is best remembered as the undergraduate teacher of Charles Ives while the composer attended Yale University.

The Unanswered Question

Charles Ives work
He composed two symphonies, as well as "The Unanswered Question" (1908), written for the unusual combination of trumpet, four flutes, and string quartet.
The Unanswered Question is a musical work by American composer Charles Ives.

Piano Sonata No. 2 (Ives)

Concord SonataPiano Sonata No. 2Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840-60
During the 1940s he revised his Concord Sonata, publishing it in 1947 (an earlier version of the sonata and the accompanying prose volume, Essays Before a Sonata were privately printed in 1920). Ives began to acquire some public recognition during the 1930s, with performances of a chamber orchestra version of his Three Places in New England both in the U.S. and on tour in Europe by conductor Nicolas Slonimsky and the New York Town Hall premiere of his Concord Sonata by pianist John Kirkpatrick in 1939, which led to favorable commentary in the major New York newspapers.
The Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass., 1840–60 (commonly known as the Concord Sonata) is a piano sonata by Charles Ives.

Three Places in New England

Orchestral Set No. 1: Three Places in New EnglandOrchestral Set No. 1: ''Three Places in New EnglandThThe Housatanic at Stockbridge
Around 1910, Ives began composing his most accomplished works including the "Holiday Symphony" and "Three Places in New England". Ives began to acquire some public recognition during the 1930s, with performances of a chamber orchestra version of his Three Places in New England both in the U.S. and on tour in Europe by conductor Nicolas Slonimsky and the New York Town Hall premiere of his Concord Sonata by pianist John Kirkpatrick in 1939, which led to favorable commentary in the major New York newspapers.
The Three Places in New England (Orchestral Set No. 1) is a composition for orchestra by American composer Charles Ives.

Symphony No. 4 (Ives)

Symphony No. 4Fourth Symphony4th Symphony
Another remarkable piece of orchestral music Ives completed was his "Fourth Symphony".
Charles Ives's Symphony No. 4, S. 4 (K. 1A4) was written between 1910 and the mid-1920s (the second movement "Comedy" was the last to be composed, most likely in 1924).

American Academy of Arts and Letters

American Academy of Arts and LettersNational Institute of Arts and LettersAmerican Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters
His widow, who died in 1969 at age 92, bequeathed the royalties from his music to the American Academy of Arts and Letters for the Charles Ives Prize.
A permanent exhibit of the recreated studio of composer Charles Ives was opened in 2014.

Calcium Light Night

His works Calcium Light Night and Yale-Princeton Football Game show the influence of college and sports on Ives' composition.
Calcium Light Night is a piece of music by American composer Charles Ives.

A Symphony: New England Holidays

New England HolidaysHoliday SymphonyIves: Holiday Symphony
Around 1910, Ives began composing his most accomplished works including the "Holiday Symphony" and "Three Places in New England".
A Symphony: New England Holidays, also known as A New England Holiday Symphony or simply a Holiday Symphony, is a composition for orchestra written by Charles Ives.

Polytonality

polytonalitypolytonalbitonality
He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.
However, it was not featured prominently in non-programmatic contexts until the twentieth century, particularly in the work of Charles Ives (Psalm 67, c. 1898–1902), Béla Bartók (Fourteen Bagatelles, op. 6, 1908), and Stravinsky (Petrushka, 1911).

John Kirkpatrick (pianist)

John KirkpatrickKirkpatrick, John John Kirkpatrick
Ives began to acquire some public recognition during the 1930s, with performances of a chamber orchestra version of his Three Places in New England both in the U.S. and on tour in Europe by conductor Nicolas Slonimsky and the New York Town Hall premiere of his Concord Sonata by pianist John Kirkpatrick in 1939, which led to favorable commentary in the major New York newspapers.
John Kirkpatrick (18 March 1905 – 8 November 1991) was an American classical pianist and music scholar, best known for championing the works of Charles Ives, Aaron Copland, Carl Ruggles, and Roy Harris.

Universe Symphony (Ives)

Universe Symphony
Ives left behind material for an unfinished "Universe Symphony", which he was unable to assemble in his life despite two decades of work.
The Universe Symphony is an unfinished work by American classical music composer Charles Ives.

Aleatoric music

aleatoricaleatoric musicaleatory
He combined the American popular and church-music traditions of his youth with European art music, and was among the first composers to engage in a systematic program of experimental music, with musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatory elements, and quarter tones, foreshadowing many musical innovations of the 20th century.
The earliest significant use of aleatory features is found in many of the compositions of American Charles Ives in the early 20th century.

Julian Myrick

Myrick, Julian
In 1907, upon the failure of Raymond & Co., he and his friend Julian Myrick formed their own insurance agency Ives & Co., which later became Ives & Myrick, where he remained until he retired.
In 1906, Myrick partnered with his colleague Charles Ives to start their own company, Ives and Myrick.

Helen Boatwright

Boatwright
Later, around the time of Ives' death in 1954, Kirkpatrick teamed with soprano Helen Boatwright for the first extended recorded recital of Ives' songs for the obscure Overtone label (Overtone Records catalog number 7). They recorded a new selection of songs for the Ives Centennial Collection that Columbia Records published in 1974.
Helen Strassburger Boatwright (November 17, 1916 – December 1, 2010) was an American soprano who specialized in the performance of American song, recorded the first full-length album of songs by composer Charles Ives and had a career that spanned more than five decades.

Elliott Carter

Elliott CarterCarterCarter, Elliott
Early supporters of Ives' music included Henry Cowell, Elliott Carter and Aaron Copland.
As a teenager, he developed an interest in music, and was encouraged by Charles Ives, who sold insurance to Carter's family.

Symphony No. 3 (Ives)

Symphony No. 3Symphony No. 3, ''The Camp MeetingThe Camp Meeting'' (Symphony No. 3)
Ives' obscurity lifted a bit in the 1940s, when he met Lou Harrison, a fan of his music who began to edit and promote it. Most notably, Harrison conducted the premiere of the Symphony No. 3, The Camp Meeting (1904) in 1946.
The Symphony No. 3, S. 3 (K. 1A3), The Camp Meeting by Charles Ives (1874–1954) was written between 1908 and 1910.

Stephen Foster

Stephen FosterStephen Collins FosterFoster
Sources of Ives' tonal imagery are hymn tunes and traditional songs, the town band at holiday parade, the fiddlers at Saturday night dances, patriotic songs, sentimental parlor ballads, and the melodies of Stephen Foster.
American classical composer Charles Ives freely quoted a wide variety of Foster's songs in many of his own works.

Symphony No. 2 (Ives)

Symphony No. 2Second Symphony
In 1951, Leonard Bernstein conducted the world premiere of Ives' Second Symphony in a broadcast concert by the New York Philharmonic.
The Second Symphony was written by Charles Ives between 1897 and 1902.

Bernard Herrmann

Bernard HerrmannHerrmannBernard Hermann
At this time, Ives was also promoted by Bernard Herrmann, who worked as a conductor at CBS and in 1940 became principal conductor of the CBS Symphony Orchestra.
He was responsible for introducing more new works to US audiences than any other conductor — he was a particular champion of Charles Ives' music, which was virtually unknown at that time.