Charles M. Schulz

Charles SchulzCharles M. SchultzCharles SchultzCharlesCharles Monroe SchultzJeannie SchulzSchulzSchulz FoundationSchulz, CharlesSchulz, Charles M.
Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others).wikipedia
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Peanuts

Peanuts WorldwideSnoopyCharlie Brown/Peanuts Specials
Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others).
Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday American comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz that ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward.

Charlie Brown

Peanuts'' character of the same namethe ''Peanuts'' character
Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others).
The character's creator, Charles M. Schulz, said of the character that "[He] must be the one who suffers because he is a caricature of the average person. Most of us are much more acquainted with losing than winning."

Snoopy

Joe CoolSnoopy Vs. the Red BaronFifi
Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others).
Snoopy is a fictional character, the pet beagle of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz.

Bill Watterson

Bill WatersonBill Watterstonseveral more awards
He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time, cited by cartoonists including Jim Davis, Bill Watterson, Matt Groening, Dav Pilkey, and Stephan Pastis.
This continued through his school years, during which time he discovered comic strips such as Pogo, Krazy Kat, and Charles Schulz' Peanuts which subsequently inspired and influenced his desire to become a professional cartoonist.

Ripley's Believe It or Not!

Ripley's Believe It or NotRipley’s Believe It or NotBelieve It or Not
In 1937, Schulz drew a picture of Spike and sent it to Ripley's Believe It or Not!; his drawing appeared in Robert Ripley's syndicated panel, captioned, "A hunting dog that eats pins, tacks, and razor blades is owned by C. F. Schulz, St. Paul, Minn."
Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz's first publication of artwork was published by Ripley.

Barney Google and Snuffy Smith

Barney GoogleSnuffy SmithBarney Google: Gambling, Horse Races & High-Toned Women
His uncle called him "Sparky" after the horse Spark Plug in Billy DeBeck's comic strip, Barney Google, which Schulz enjoyed reading.
Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz was known to his friends as Sparky, a lifelong nickname given to him by his uncle as a diminutive of Barney Google's Spark Plug.

Matt Groening

Bat GroeningGroeningHomer Groening
He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time, cited by cartoonists including Jim Davis, Bill Watterson, Matt Groening, Dav Pilkey, and Stephan Pastis.
He first became interested in cartoons after watching the Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians, and he has also cited Robert Crumb, Ernie Bushmiller, Ronald Searle, Monty Python, and Charles M. Schulz as inspirations.

Li'l Folks

Lil' Folks
Schulz's first group of regular cartoons, a weekly series of one-panel jokes called Lil' Folks, was published from June 1947 to January 1950 in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, with Schulz usually doing four one-panel drawings per issue.
Li'l Folks, the first comic strip by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, was a weekly panel that appeared mainly in Schulz's hometown paper, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, from June 22, 1947, to January 22, 1950.

Snoopy's siblings

SpikeSpike (Peanuts character)Andy (''Peanuts'')
In Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts, Snoopy was often stated to have seven siblings.

Linus van Pelt

Linus
Linus van Pelt is a character in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts.

Stephan Pastis

Stephen Pastis
He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time, cited by cartoonists including Jim Davis, Bill Watterson, Matt Groening, Dav Pilkey, and Stephan Pastis.
One day in 1996, Pastis drove to an ice rink in Santa Rosa where Charles Schulz, the creator of Peanuts, had his coffee every day.

Peppermint Patty

Patricia "Peppermint Patty" ReichardtPatricia "Peppermint Patty" RichardtPeppermint" Patty Reichardt
Patricia "Peppermint Patty" Reichardt is a fictional character featured in Charles M. Schulz' comic strip Peanuts.

Saint Paul, Minnesota

St. Paul, MinnesotaSaint PaulSt. Paul
Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Schulz grew up in Saint Paul.
Saint Paul is the birthplace of cartoonist Charles M. Schulz (Peanuts), who lived in Merriam Park from infancy until 1960.

It's Only a Game

Schulz also had a short-lived sports-oriented comic strip, It's Only a Game (1957–59), but he abandoned it after the success of Peanuts.
It's Only a Game was a sports-and-game-oriented comics panel by Charles M. Schulz, creator of Peanuts.

Shermy

Shermy is a fictional character from the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles Schulz.

St. Paul Pioneer Press

Saint Paul Pioneer PressPioneer PressSt. Paul Pioneer Press and Dispatch
Schulz's first group of regular cartoons, a weekly series of one-panel jokes called Lil' Folks, was published from June 1947 to January 1950 in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, with Schulz usually doing four one-panel drawings per issue.
From 1947 to 1949, the newspaper printed the comic strip Li'l Folks, by Twin Cities native Charles M. Schulz.

Little Red-Haired Girl

Donna JohnstonDonna Mae JohnsonDonna Wold
The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, who serves as the object of Charlie Brown's affection, and a symbol of unrequited love.

George Herriman

George [HerrimanGeorge Joseph HerrimanThe Family Upstairs
Schulz (and critics) also credited George Herriman (Krazy Kat), Roy Crane (Wash Tubbs), Elzie C. Segar (Thimble Theatre) and Percy Crosby (Skippy) as influences.
Herriman's work has been a primary influence on cartoonists such as Will Eisner, Charles M. Schulz, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, Bill Watterson, and Chris Ware.

Minnesota

MNState of MinnesotaMinnesota, USA
Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Schulz grew up in Saint Paul.
The comic strip Peanuts was created by St. Paul native Charles M. Schulz.

Popeye

Popeye the SailorThimble TheatrePopeye the Sailor Man
Schulz (and critics) also credited George Herriman (Krazy Kat), Roy Crane (Wash Tubbs), Elzie C. Segar (Thimble Theatre) and Percy Crosby (Skippy) as influences.
Charles M. Schulz said, "I think Popeye was a perfect comic strip, consistent in drawing and humor".

Percy Crosby

Always Belittlin
Schulz (and critics) also credited George Herriman (Krazy Kat), Roy Crane (Wash Tubbs), Elzie C. Segar (Thimble Theatre) and Percy Crosby (Skippy) as influences.
An inspiration for Charles Schulz's Peanuts, the strip is regarded by comics historian Maurice Horn as a "classic... which innovated a number of sophisticated and refined touches used later by Charles Schulz and Bill Watterson."

United Feature Syndicate

United Features SyndicateUnited FeaturesUnited Feature
Later that year, Schulz approached United Feature Syndicate with the one-panel series Li'l Folks, and the syndicate became interested.

Jim Davis (cartoonist)

Jim Davis
He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time, cited by cartoonists including Jim Davis, Bill Watterson, Matt Groening, Dav Pilkey, and Stephan Pastis.
His influences include Mort Walker's Beetle Bailey and Hi and Lois, Charles M. Schulz's Peanuts, Milton Caniff's Steve Canyon and Johnny Hart's B.C.

Lucy van Pelt

Lucy
The character Lucy van Pelt also expresses a fondness for the film, and in one strip she cruelly spoils the ending for her younger brother.
Lucille van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz.

Linus Maurer

Linus Maurer was the inspiration for the name of Charles M. Schulz's famous character, Linus van Pelt, in the Peanuts comic strip.