Charles V of France

Charles VKing Charles VCharlesDauphin CharlesDauphinCharles I of ViennoisCharles V the WiseCharles V, King of FranceKing Charles V of FranceCharles the Wise
Charles V (21 January 1338 – 16 September 1380), called the Wise (le Sage; Sapiens), was King of France from 1364 to his death.wikipedia
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Dauphiné

DauphinoisDauphinyDauphiné Viennois
In 1349, as a young prince, Charles received from his grandfather King Philip VI the province of Dauphiné to rule.
The title was established by the royal house of France through the purchase of lands known as the Dauphiné in 1349 by the future Charles V of France.

John II of France

John IIJohn the GoodJohn, Duke of Normandy
Charles became regent of France when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356. Charles was born at the Château de Vincennes outside of Paris, the son of Prince John and Princess Bonne of France.
While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles became regent and faced several rebellions, which he overcame.

Dauphin of France

DauphinThe DauphinDauphins
This allowed him to bear the title "Dauphin" until his coronation, which led to the integration of the Dauphiné into the crown lands of France.
The first French prince called le Dauphin was Charles the Wise, later to become Charles V of France.

Philip VI of France

Philip VIKing Philip VIPhilip of Valois
In 1349, as a young prince, Charles received from his grandfather King Philip VI the province of Dauphiné to rule.
In 1349, Philip VI bought the Dauphiné from its ruined ruler Humbert II and entrusted the government of this province to his grandson Charles.

Battle of Poitiers

PoitiersBattle of Poitiers (1356)battle
Charles became regent of France when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356.
The effect of the defeat on France was catastrophic, leaving Dauphin Charles to rule the country.

Bertrand du Guesclin

Du GuesclinBertrand de GuesclinDuguesclin
Led by Bertrand du Guesclin, the French Army was able to turn the tide of the Hundred Years' War to Charles' advantage, and by the end of Charles' reign, they had reconquered almost all the territories ceded to the English in 1360.
From 1370 to his death, he was Constable of France for King Charles V.

Charles VI of France

Charles VIKing Charles VICharles
He was succeeded by his son Charles VI, whose disastrous reign allowed the English to regain control of large parts of France.
Charles was born in Paris, in the royal residence of the Hôtel Saint-Pol, on 3 December 1368, the son of the king of France Charles V, of the House of Valois, and of Joan of Bourbon.

Charles II of Navarre

Charles IICharles the BadCharles II the Bad
As a result, he faced hostility from the nobility, led by Charles the Bad, King of Navarre; the opposition of the French bourgeoisie, which was channeled through the Estates-General led by Étienne Marcel; and with a peasant revolt known as the Jacquerie. He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres. Du Guesclin also defeated Charles II of Navarre at the Battle of Cocherel in 1364 and eliminated his threat to Paris.
Charles befriended and was thought to be trying to influence the Dauphin, and was apparently involved in a botched coup d'état in December 1355 whose purpose appears to have been to replace John II with the Dauphin.

Treaty of Brétigny

Treaty of BretignyPeace of BrétignyTreaty of Calais
Charles overcame all of these rebellions, but in order to liberate his father, he had to conclude the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360, in which he abandoned large portions of south-western France to Edward III of England and agreed to pay a huge ransom.
The ensuing conflicts in Paris between Étienne Marcel and the Dauphin (later King Charles V), and the outbreak of the Jacquerie peasant revolt weakened French bargaining power.

John, Duke of Berry

Jean, duc de BerryJean de BerryDuke of Berry
He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres.
He was the third son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxemburg; his brothers were King Charles V of France, Duke Louis I of Anjou and Duke Philip the Bold of Burgundy.

Jacquerie

a violent peasant revoltGrande JacquerieJacques
As a result, he faced hostility from the nobility, led by Charles the Bad, King of Navarre; the opposition of the French bourgeoisie, which was channeled through the Estates-General led by Étienne Marcel; and with a peasant revolt known as the Jacquerie.
After the capture of the French king (John II, Froissart's bon roi Jean "good king John") by the English during the Battle of Poitiers in September 1356, power in France devolved fruitlessly among the Estates-General, King Charles II of Navarre and John's son, the Dauphin, later Charles V.

Bonne of Luxembourg

Bonne of BohemiaBonneBonne de Luxembourg
Charles was born at the Château de Vincennes outside of Paris, the son of Prince John and Princess Bonne of France.
Among her children were Charles V of France, Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, and Joan, Queen of Navarre.

Château de Vincennes

VincennesCastle of VincennesChateau de Vincennes
Charles was born at the Château de Vincennes outside of Paris, the son of Prince John and Princess Bonne of France.
1410). The donjon served as a residence for the royal family, and its buildings are known to have once held the library and personal study of Charles V.

Louis II, Duke of Bourbon

Louis IILouis II of BourbonDuke of Bourbon
He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres.
Duke Louis is reported to have been somewhat mentally unstable, specifically having a trait of nervous breakdowns which is presumably hereditary; this trait was also evidenced in his sister Joanna of Bourbon (the wife of French King Charles V), his nephew Charles VI of France (called "The Mad"), his father Duke Peter, and his grandfather Louis I, Duke of Bourbon.

Grenoble

Grenoble, FranceGratianopolisCollège Roqua
At the age of twelve, he was suddenly vested power while in Grenoble (10 December 1349 to March 1350).
Without an heir, Humbert sold his state to France in 1349, on the condition that the heir to the French crown used the title of Dauphin. The first one, the future Charles V, spent nine months in Grenoble.

Hundred Years' War

Hundred Years WarHundred Years’ WarHundred Year's War
Led by Bertrand du Guesclin, the French Army was able to turn the tide of the Hundred Years' War to Charles' advantage, and by the end of Charles' reign, they had reconquered almost all the territories ceded to the English in 1360. His reign marked a high point for France during the Hundred Years' War, with his armies recovering much of the territory held by the English, and successfully reversed the military losses of his predecessors. Furthermore, the French fleet, led by Jean de Vienne, managed to attack the English coast for the first time since the beginning of the Hundred Years' War.
With John held hostage, his son the Dauphin (later to become Charles V) assumed the powers of the king as regent.

Louis I of Anjou

Louis I, Duke of AnjouLouis ILouis of Anjou
He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres.
Louis was present at the Battle of Poitiers (1356), in the battalion commanded by his brother Charles, the Dauphin.

Philip the Bold

Philip II, Duke of BurgundyPhilipPhilip II the Bold
He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres.
Philip was very active at the court of France, particularly after the death in 1380 of his brother King Charles V, whose successor Charles VI became king at the age of 11.

Étienne Marcel

Etienne Marcel
As a result, he faced hostility from the nobility, led by Charles the Bad, King of Navarre; the opposition of the French bourgeoisie, which was channeled through the Estates-General led by Étienne Marcel; and with a peasant revolt known as the Jacquerie.
On 17 October, his heir, the Dauphin Charles, called together the Estates General.

Jean de Vienne

Furthermore, the French fleet, led by Jean de Vienne, managed to attack the English coast for the first time since the beginning of the Hundred Years' War.
In 1373, Charles V made him Amiral de France.

Robert, Duke of Bar

Robert I, Duke of BarRobert I of BarRobert
He was educated at court with other boys of his age with whom he would remain close throughout his life: his uncle Philip, Duke of Orléans (only two years older than himself), his three brothers Louis, John, and Philip, Louis of Bourbon, Edward and Robert of Bar, Godfrey of Brabant, Louis I, Count of Étampes, Louis of Évreux, brother of Charles the Bad, John and Charles of Artois, Charles of Alençon, and Philip of Rouvres.
He assisted at the coronation of Charles V of France at Reims on 9 May 1364, then at that of Charles VI of France on 4 November 1380.

Ransom of King John II of France

ransoma huge ransomcaptivity of his father in England
Charles overcame all of these rebellions, but in order to liberate his father, he had to conclude the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360, in which he abandoned large portions of south-western France to Edward III of England and agreed to pay a huge ransom.
Prominently, Dauphin Charles and his younger brother Louis left the battle early, possibly as a result of an order from John.

Edward III of England

Edward IIIKing Edward IIIKing Edward III of England
Charles overcame all of these rebellions, but in order to liberate his father, he had to conclude the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360, in which he abandoned large portions of south-western France to Edward III of England and agreed to pay a huge ransom.
He was followed by the vigorous Charles V, who enlisted the help of the capable Constable Bertrand du Guesclin.

Joanna of Bourbon

Joan of BourbonJeanne de BourbonJoanna
On April 8, 1350 at Tain-l'Hermitage, the Dauphin married his cousin Joanna of Bourbon at the age of 12.
Joanna of Bourbon (3 February 1338 – 6 February 1378) was Queen of France by marriage to King Charles V.

Battle of Cocherel

Cocherel
Du Guesclin also defeated Charles II of Navarre at the Battle of Cocherel in 1364 and eliminated his threat to Paris.
The Battle of Cocherel was a battle fought on 16 May 1364 between the forces of Charles V of France and the forces of Charles II of Navarre (known as Charles the Bad), over the succession to the dukedom of Burgundy.